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Full text of "New Hampshire in the great rebellion. Containing histories of the several New Hampshire regiments, and biographical notices of many of the prominent actors in the civil war of 1861-65"

CORNELL 

UNIVERSITY 

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NEW HAMPSHIRE 



IN TEE 



GREAT REBELLION. 



coBTAiirnra 



HISTORIES OF THE SEVERAL NEW HAMPSHIRE REGIMENTS, 

AND BIOGRAPHICAL NOTICES OF MANY OF THE 

PROMINENT ACTORS 



CIVIL WAR OF 1861-65. 



BY MAJOR OTIS F. R. WAITE, 

AUTHOB 07 "TISHOST IK THI SBXAT BXBIUJON," "CLASIKOKT WAB HISIOBT," IN. 



CLAREMONT, N. H.: 

PUBLISHBD BY TRACT, CHASE 4 COMPANY. 
1870. 



(Vf 



Xntored according to Act of Congress, in the year 1870, by 

0II8 P. B. WAIIIi, 

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the District of New Hampshire. 



StereotTped, Printed and Boand at the Book XetabUilment of 
THX CLAEXMOHI KA^UFACTQBIHa COHPAKT. 



TO 

THE PEOPLE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE, 

AND HER 

SURVIVING MILITARY HEROES 

WHO FOUGHT IN THE GREAT NATIONAL CONFLICT, 

1861-68, 

THIS BOOK IS RBYHRENTLT INSCRIBED 

BT THE AUTHOB. 



ILLUSTRATIONS. 



1. GOVERNOR ICHABOD GOODWIN, Frontspiece. 

2. " NATHANIEL S. BERRY .'.....92 

3. " FREDERICK SMYTH 582 

4. GENERAL SIMON G. GRIFFIN 306 

5. " JOHN BEDEL 182 

6. •• NATT HEAD 600 

7. " SAMUEL A. DUNCAN 505 

8. " JOSEPH C. ABBOTT 348 

9. " AARON F. STEVENS 483 

10. COLONEL ENOCH Q. FELLOWS 402 

11. " EDWARD E. CROSS, 262 

12. BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG 152 

13. CHARGE AT FREDERICKSBURG 282 

14. THE SHARPSHOOTER 666 



PEEFACE, 



It New HampsMre did not do as much toward the suppreeaion of the late 
Great Rebellion as any of her sister States, it iras because she is circumscribed 
in territorial limits and has a smaller population and less wealth than some 
of the others, and not for want of fidelity to the Union or loyalty to the Gen- 
eral Government. What she had was freely placed upon the altar of her 
country. When the national flag on the ramparts of Sumter was ruthlessly 
assailed by traitors and the President called upon the State for aid to protect 
the honor, the rights and property of the government from rebels in arms 
against them, she acted promptly, energetically, patriotically. Bank vaults 
and private coffers were thrown wide open and their contents placed at the 
service of the State authorities ; her young men left their farms, factories, 
workshops, stores, counting-houses, schools and colleges and took up arms 
with alacrity. They were sent to the field as well armed and equipped for the 
duties beibre them as troops from any other State. They fought as often, as 
bravely, and suffered as much in battle, in -the trenches, in camp, hospitals 
and rebel pris(nis as those from any other State, and made as little complaint. 

To make a history of all the noble and heroic deeds of the brave men of 
New Hampshire in the field, and the patriotie action of the State, would require 
many volumes of the size of this one. The author hoped only to give a gener- 
al view, rather than fiill details. Influenced by no partiality for any man or 
organization, he has endeavored to deal justly by aU who acted prominent 
parts in and during the war, so far as his circumscribed limits would permit. 
If much has been omitted which might rightfully claim a place in this book, 
great pains have been taken to make its history correct, so far as it goes, and 
to give credit where credit fiurly belongs. 

The author is under obligations to many gentlemen for valuable assistance 
in preparing this book. To Adjutant jjleneral Natt Head, for his invaluable 
Beports covering the period of the war, from which histories of the organiza- 
tion and movements of many of the regiments have been condensed, and other 
documents — without a free use of which the present work must have been 
much less perfect than it is. To General John Bedel of the Third ; Rev. Ste- 
phen 0. Abbott, Chaplun of the First ; Bev. John W. Adams, Chaplain of 



VI PBEFACE. 

the Second ; Colonel Thomas J. Whipple, of the Fourth ; Colonel J. E. Larkin, 
of the Fifth; Dr. Sherman Cooper, of the Sixth, and Colonel Robert Wilson, 
of the Fourteenth, for aid in the preparation of the history of their several 
regiments. To Hon. Charles H. Bell, of Exeter and J. E. Pecker, of Concord, 
for contributions. To Colonel John B. Clarke, of the Manchester Mirror, for 
the use of his files, and to many other gentlemen who have shown interest in 
the work and extended needed favors. " 

The portraits presented in this volume are of New Hampshire men who 
acted their parts in the great tragic drama, at home or in the field, nObly and 
patriotically. Many others deserve a place here, but for reasons beyond the 
author's control, could not be obtained. 

With all its short-comings and imperfections this book is submitted to the 
people of New Hampshire, with the hope that at no very distant day a more 
elaborate and complete history may be written and published of the patriotic 
action of the State, and of the heroic deeds of her brave troops in the War of 
the Great Bebellion, than has here been attempted. 

0. v. B. W. 

Clabbmont, April A. D. 1870. 



CONTENTS. 



txai. 

Action of New Hampshire — ^Part II .49 

Action of tlie State 87 

Biographical Sketches, „.577 

Summary of New Hampshire TroopB,»....674 

The Bebellion— Part I, 9 

Three Months' Troops 62 

Battles, of Antietam .279, 320, 409 

Attack on Petersburg, 491 

Attack on Port Hudson, 370 

Bull Run 134 

Bull Bun— Second 145 

Cedar Creek,_ 612 

Chancellorsyille, 471 

Charge on Fort Wagner, 197, 367 

Cold Harbor, 169 

Drury's Bluff, 203 

fair Oaks, 141 

Fort Harrison,.. 440 

Fredericksburg,....148, 282, 332, 410, 464 

Gettysburg,... 162,287 

South Mountain,. .408 

Spoitsylrania, ^.415 

Williamsburg, 139 

Winchester, 611 

Seren Bays' Fight 142 

Siege of EnozTille 466 

Wilson's Baid,.. 661 

BlOQBAPHICAL SE£TCB£B of 

Abbott, General Joseph C 348 

Bailey, Colonel Edward L 123 

Bedel, General John 182 

Bell, Colonel Louis S26 

Berry, Governor Nathaniel S 679 

Bizby, Colonel Phin P- 311 

Colby, General Anthony 800 

Colby, General Daniel E 601 

ConTerae, Colonel Nelson 306 

Collins, Lieut. Colonel Moses N .462 

Cross, Colonel Edward E .262 

Dame, Miss Harriet P 124 

Donohoe, General Michael T 427 

Duncan, General Samuel A 606 

Everett, M^gor George Washington...407 

Fearing, Colonel Hawkes, Jr. 372 

Fellows, Colonel Enoch Q. 402 

Foster, General John G 607 

Gardiner, Colonel Alexander 603 



BlOOBAf moAL Skzichzb. pasi 

Gilmore, Governor Joseph A 681 

Goodwin, Governor Ichabod 677 

Griffin, General Simon G 306 

Hapgood, Colonel Charles E 268 

Harriman, General Walter ....449 

Head, General Natt 601 

Henderson, Lieut. Col. Thos. Albert..862 

Jackson, Colonel John H 181 

Kingman, Colonel John W 619 

Loll, Lieut. Col. Oliver Woodbury ....373 

Marston, General Oilman 136 

Patterson, General J. N 121 

Pearson, Lieut. Colonel Henry H 312 

Pike, Colonel James 530 

Potter, General Joseph H. 469 

Putnam, Colonel Haldimand S 345 

Smith, Major Daniel 364 

Smyth, Governor Frederick 582 

Stevens, General Aaron Fletcher 483 

Sturtevant, Major Edward E 270 

Tappan, Colonel Mason W 59 

Titus, Colonel Herbert B .406 

Whipple, Colonel Thomas J 223 

Wilson, Colonel Robert 503 

Regiuents — First .67 

Second 103 

Third J69 

Fourth,,. 216 

'Fifth 252 

Sixth 297 

Seventh, 338 

Eighth 366 

" Veteran Battalion 389 

Ninth...... 396 

Tenth , 421 

Eleventh 444 

Twelfth 462 

Thirteenth 478 

Fourteenth, 496 

Fifteenth, „ 616 

Sixteenth _.......628 

Seventeenth „ 535 

Eighteenth, _ 538 

First Cavalry - 644 

First Light Battery 666 

First Heavy Artillery, .660 

Sharpshooters 667 




THE EEBELLION. 



PA.IIT I. 

POSITION OF AFFAIRS PREVIOUS TO AND AT THE TIME OF THE 
BREAKING OUT OF THE WAR. 



FROM the day of the adoption of the Constitution 
there has been an antagonism between the Iforth- 
ern and the Southern portions of the United States. — 
That Constitution contains not one word hostile to hb- 
erty and humanity. In it, however, is a single phrase 
which has been interpreted differently by the different 
sections of the country — "held to labor." At the 
North, these sample, harmless words mean a hired man, 
an apprentice. At the South, they mean a slave, feudal 
bondage, the right of property in man, and all the 
attendant oppressions and cruelties. From these differ- 
ent constructions of the spirit of the organic law of the 
country, and the widely different modes of life and of 
thought, the antagonism between the North and the 
South has grown with the growth and strengthened 
with the strength of the nation. Mr. Iverson, of 
Georgia, in speaking on this subject in the United 
States Senate, on the 5th of December, 1860, said, "Sir, 
disguise the fact as you will, there^ is an enmity between 
the Northern and the Southern people, which is deep 



10 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

and enduring, and you can never eradicate it— never. 
.... We are enemies as much as if we were hostile 
States, "We have not lived in peace. "We are not now 
living in peace. It is not expected that we shall ever 
live in peace." 

Mr. Mason, of Virginia, in the same dehate, said, 
" This is a war of sentiment and opinion, by one form 
of society against another form of society." 

Garrett Davis, senator from Kentucky, said, "The 
Cotton States, by their slave labor, have become wealthy, 
and many of their planters have princ6ly revenues — 
from fifty to one hundred thousand dollars a year. 
This wealth has begot pride, and insolence, and ambi- 
tion; and those points of the Southern character have 
been displayed most insultingly in the halls of Congress. 
As a class, the wealthy cotton growers are insolent, they 
are proud, they are domineering, they are ambitious. 
■ They have ijionopolized the government in its honors 
for forty or fifty years, with few interruptions. When 
they saw the scepter about to depart froili them, in the 
election of Abraham Lincoln, sooner than give up office, 
and the spoils of office, in their mad and wicked ambi- 
tion, they determined to disrupt the old Confederation, 
and erect a new one, wherein they would have undis- 
puted power. Nine out of ten of the Northern people 
were sound upon the subject. They were opposed to 
the extension of slavery; and I do not condemn them 
for that : but they were willing to accord to the slave- 
holders all their constitutional rights." 

The slaveholders had become arrogant in their de- 
mands upon Congress, claiming that the Constitution 
favored freedom, free labor, and free schools, and that 
it should be so far changed as to maintain the exclusive 
claims of an aristocratic class, and to strengthen their 
hold upon their slaves. They insisted that the domestic 
slave trade should be nurtured, and the foreign slave 



TSE GREAT REBELLION. 11 

trade opened. They demanded the right to extend 
slavery over all the Territories of the United States; 
the right to hold their slaves in all the' States of the 
Union temporarily; that speaking or writing against 
slavery in any State of the Union should be a penal 
offense; that the North should catch their fugitive 
slaves, and send them hack to bondage; and that the 
administration of the General Government should be 
placed in the hands of those only whom the South could 
trust, as the pledged enemies of republican equality, 
and the friends of slavery. These were the demands of 
the South, which, they said, must be acceded to, or they 
would dash the Union to pieces and from the fragments 
construct a Confederacy, with slavery for its corner 
stone. 

In the election of Abraham Lincoln to the Presi- 
dency, in 1860, the people of the United States said, 
most emphatically, ""We will not accede to these arro- 
gant and wicked demands. We will not thus change 
the Constitution of our fathers. We will abide by it as 
it is." In an appeal to the ballot-box the slaveholders 
were fairly and overwhelmingly defeated, and they 
determined to secede and break up the Union. 

As long ago as 1856, Hon. Preston Brooks, of South 
Carolina, said, in a speech in Charleston, at an ovation 
given in his honor, for his brutal assault upon Senator 
Sumner, of Massachusetts, for words spoken in debate 
in his place in the Senate, " I tell you, fellow-citizens, 
from the bottom of my heart, that the only mode which 
I think available for meeting it [the issue], is just to 
tear the Constitution of the United States, trample it 
under foot, and form a Southern Confederacy, every 
State of which shall be a Slaveholding State." 

Mr. Hunter, of Virginia, detailed in the Senate of the 
United States the changes in the Constitution with 



12 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

which alone the Slaveholders would be satisfied. Hia 
demands were : — 

1. Congress shall have no power to abolish slavery in 
the States, or the District of Columbia, or the dock- 
yards, forts, and arsenals of the United States. 

2. Congress shall not abolish, tax, or obstruct the 
slave trade between the States. 

3. It shall be the duty of each of the States to sup- 
press combination, within its jurisdiction, for the armed 
invasion of any other State. 

4. States shall be admitted with or without slavery, 
according to the election of the people. 

5. It shall be the duty of the States to restore fugi- 
tive slaves, or pay the value of the same. 

6. Fugitives from justice shall be deemed those wlio 
have offended the laws of the State within its jurisdic- 
tion, and shall have escaped therefrom. 

7. Congress shall recognize and protect as property, 
what is held to be such by the laws of any State, in the 
Territories, dockyards, arsenals, forts, and wherever the 
United States have exclusive jurisdiction. 

Mr. Hunter also demanded that there should always be 
two Presidents chosen, one by the Slavholding States, 
and the other by the North, and that no act should be 
valid unless approved by both Presidents. Thus giving 
to not more than three hundred thousand slaveholders 
as much power in the government as to the other thirty 
millions of population. He also demanded that the 
United States Supreme Court should consist of ten 
members, five to be chosen by the little handful of 
slaveholders, and the other five by the millions of 
freemen. 

To accomplish their purpose, every man at the South 
was to be compelled, by the reign of terror, to support 
the cause of the slaveholders. Vigilance committees 
were organized, the mails were searched, and a system 



THE QBE AT REBELLION. 13 

of espionage introduced, such as no despotism on earth 
ever before equalled. A gentleman from Hinds County, 
Mississippi, wrote to the editor of the N^ew York 
Tribune, under date of February 7, 1861 : — 

" I have lived in this State twenty-five years. Yet if 
I should say, not openly upon the housetop, but at my 
own table, among my family and friends congregated 
there, that I do not consider that the South has any 
real grievance to complain of, and totally oppose the 
secession of this or any other State from the Union, my 
property, my life even, would not be safe an hour. It is 
very certain that those who are in favor of secession 
have no more than a bare majority in any of the South- 
ern States. "We, the Union men of the South, call on 
you of the ]!^orth not to desert us." 

The slaveholders demanded further, in addition to the 
right of the general extension of slavery, that the laws 
of the Free States should be so changed as to enable 
them to hold their enslaved servants at the North tem- 
porarily, while, at the same time, they refused to allow 
a ^Northern gentleman even to enter their States with a 
free hired colored servant. 

The candidates for President in 1860 were Abraham 
Lincoln, of Illinois, nominated by the Republican party, 
who was openly pledged to resist the extension of 
slavery, while he avowed that Congress had no consti- 
tutional right to interfere with slavery in those States 
where it existed, but that it was both the right and the 
duty of Congress to prohibit slavery in all the United 
States Territories. John C. Breckinridge of Ken- 
tucky, was the candidate of the slaveholders, pledged 
to administer the government in the most effectual 
way to nurture and to give increasing political power 
to the institution of slavery. Stephen A. Douglas, of 
Illinois, and John Bell, of Tennessee, were supported 
by those who wished to effect some compromise. 



14 THE QBE AT REBELLION. 

and who were ready, for the sake of avoiding civil 
war, to make very great concessions to the South, 

The election took place on the 6th of l^ovember, and 
the result of the popular vote was, for electors: Lincoln, 
1,857>610; Douglas, 1,365,976; Breckinridge, 847,953; 
Bell, 591,613; giving Lincoln the electoral votes of 
seventeen out of the thirty-three States; eleven for 
Breckinridge ; three for Bell, and one — Missouri — ^with 
three-sevenths of New Jersey, for Douglas. 

Mr. Lincoln received the electoral votes of California, 
4; Connecticut, 6; Illinois, 11; Indiana, 13; Iowa, 4; 
Maine, 8; Massachusetts, 13; Michigan, 6; Minnesota, 
4; New Hampshire, 5; New Jersey, 4; New York, 35; 
Ohio, 23; Oregon, 3; Pennsylvania, 27; Rhode Island, 
4; Vermont, 5; "Wisconsin, 5 — 180. John C. Breckin- 
ridge received the votes of Alabama, 9; Arkansas, 4; 
Delaware, 3; Florida, 3; Georgia 10; Louisiana,- 6; 
Maryland, 8; Mississippi, 7; North Carolina, 10; South 
Carolina, 8; Texas, 4 — 72. Stephen A. Douglas, receiv- 
ed the votes of Missouri, 9, and 3 of the 7 votes of New 
Jersey — 12. John Bell received the votes of Kentucky, 
12; Tennessee, 12; Virginia, 15—39. Hannibal Hamlin, 
of Maine, was elected Vice-President, receiving 180 
electoral votes, while Joseph Lane received 72, Edward 
Everett 39, and Hersehel V. Johnson 12. The electors 
chosen in New Hampshire were, John Sullivan, of 
Exeter; Ebenezer Stevens, of Meredith,; David Gillis, 
of Nashua; Nathaniel ToUes, of Claremont; and Daniel 
Blaisdell, of Hanover. ' 

On the fifteenth of February, in the presence of the 
two Houses of Congress, the Electoral votes were 
officially counted and declared by John C. Breckinridge, 
the slaveholders' candidate for President, who was at 
that time Vice-President and the President of the 
Senate. Amid deadly silence, the result was announced 
as follows : One hundred and eighty votes were cast for 



TSE GREAT REBELLION. 15 

Abraham Lincoln; seventy-two for Jolin C. Breckin- 
ridge ; thirty-nine for John Bell ; twelve for Stephen A. 
Douglas, This gave to Abraham Lincoln a majority of 
fifty-seven votes over all the other candidates. "Where- 
upon the Vice-President rising, said, "Abraham Lin- 
coln, of Illinois, having received a majority of the 
whole number of electoral votes, is duly elected Presi- 
dent of the United States for the four years commenc- 
ing on the 4th of March, 1861. And Hannibal Hamlin, 
of Maine, having received a majority of the whole num- 
ber of electoral votes, is duly, elected Vice-President for 
the same term." 

This was a day of great excitement in "Washington. 
It was a slaveholding city, in the midst of slaveholding 
States, and fire-eaters from the South were there in great 
numbers, and had boldly threatened that the announce- 
mentof the vote for President should not be made, and 
that the government should be broken up in a row. 
James Buchanan was then President; had been intim- 
idated by the slaveholders, and, if he was not in sympa- 
thy with them, had not the courage to prepare to meet 
and thwart their threats of violence. In that crisis the 
nation could place but little reliance upon his efficiency, 
and reposed but little confidence in his patriotism. 
General Winfield Scott had prepared to meet any emer- 
gency that might arise, by drawing to the city a military 
force and so planting their guns as to sweep the streets at 
the first outbreak, thus overawing the conspirators; and 
the day passed quietly, and everything was done with 
decency and in order. 

On the 20th of December, 1860, a convention of a 
few score of slaveholders in South Carolina, led off in 
the rebellion, and passed the foUoiiring resolution : — 

" We, the people of the State of South Carolina, in 
oonvention assembled, do declare and ordain, and it is 



16 TSE QMEAT REBELLION. 

hereby declared and ordained, that the ordinance adopt- 
ed by us in convention, on the 23d of May, in the year 
of our Lord 1788, whereby the Constitution of the 
United States of America was ratified, and also all acts, 
and parts of acts, of the General Assembly of this State 
ratifying the amendments of said Constitution, are 
hereby repealed, and that the Union now subsisting 
between South Carolina and other States, under the 
name of the United States of America, is hereby 
dissolved." 

In the course of the month of January, 1861, the 
States of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Missis- 
sippi, and North Carolina followed, and adopted similar 
acts of secession to that adopted by South Carolina; 
and, on the 4th of February, forty-two delegates, repre- 
senting these seven seceded States, met at Montgomery, 
Alabama, and proceeded to organize a Southern Confed- 
eracy of these, with such others as might subsequently 
be added, and elected Jefferson Davis, President, and 
Alexander H. Stephens, Vice-President. On the •18th 
of the same month, Jefferson Davis was inaugurated 
President at Montgomery. 

President Buchanan's cabinet was composed of slave- 
holders, and others who favored Southern principles. 
In Ifovember, as soon as the result of the presidential 
election was known, these men set at work to embarrass 
and cripple the government, that its capital, forts, arse- 
nals, pubhc property, and munitions of war might 
easily fall into the hands of the wicked conspirators 
against the Union. Lewis Cass, of Michigan, was Sec- 
retary of State, and tried to persu'ade the President to 
take steps to avert the impending calamity, and protect 
the public property; failing in which, he resigned in 
December, and was succeeded by Jeremiah S. Black, of 
Pennsylvania. Howell Cobb, a slaveholder from Geor- 
gia, was Secretary of the Treasury. "When he entered 



THE OBEA T REBELLION. 17 

upon office, tlie national treasury was in a healthy and 
prosperous condition. He resigned, and took an office 
under the conspirators. More than six millions of dol- 
lars had been stolen, and, when his successor went 
into office, the treasury was on the verge of bankruptcy. 
Jacob Thompson, a Mississippi slaveholder, was Secre- 
tary of the Interior, and did all in his power to aid the 
conspirators. John B. Floyd, a Yirginia slaveholder, 
was Secretary of "War. 

There was a plan -on foot — ^which, thank God, was 
discovered in season to thwart it — ^to assassinate the 
President elect when on his way to Washington to take 
his seat. In the panic, which it was supposed would 
ensue, troops from the adjacent Slave States of Mary- 
land and Virginia were to seize upon "Washington and 
all its treasures, and make it the capital of the new 
Confederacy. To this end the United States army — 
but a few thousands in number — was so disposed that 
the soldiers could not rally to the support of the 
government, while the arsenals at the North were 
despoiled, the arms sent to the Slave States, and the 
fortifications in those States seized and garrisoned by 
the conspirators. Having accomplished all this, Floyd 
sent in his resignation, joined the rebels, and was 
appointed a general in their sirmy. Most of the clerks 
and employees in the different departments of the 
government at "Washington were in sympathy with the 
conspirators, and many were actively aiding them in 
their damnable plots to overthrow the best government 
that the sun ever shone upon. 

Isaac Toucey, of Connecticut, was Secretary of the 
Navy. According to the report of his successor to 
Congress, July 4, 1861, our fleet in February, 1861, con- 
sisted of ninety vessels of all classes, carrying two 
thousand four hundred and fifteen guns ; and was 
manned by a complement of about seven thousand six 



18 TSE QBE AT REBELLION. 

hundred men, exclusive of officers and marines. Not- 
withstanding the necessity for the presence of this fleet 
in our own waters to aid the government in this trying 
hour, it was dispersed, for no good excuse; the Brook- 
lyn, twenty-five guns, and the store-ship Relief, two guns, 
only remaining, to defend the entire Atlantic coast. 

On the 21st of February, 1861, a select committee of 
five, appointed by the House of Representatives, in a 
report upon the conduct of the Secretary of the Navy, 
after stating what disposition had been made of our 
naval force, said : — 

" The committee cannot fail to call attention to this 
extraordinary disposition of the entire naval force of 
the country, and especially in connection with the pres- 
ent no less extraordinary and critical juncture of our 
political affairs. They cannot call to mind any period 
in the past history of the country, of such profound 
peace and inte"rnal repose, as would justify so entire an 
abandonment of the coast of the country to the chance 
of fortune. Certainly since the nation possessed a navy, 
it has never before sent its entire available force into 
distant seas, and exposed the immense interests at home, 
of which it is the especial guardian, to the dangers from 
which, even in times of the utmost quiet, prudence and 
forecast do not always shelter them. 

" To the committee this disposition of the naval force, 
at this most critical period, seems extraordinary. The 
permitting of vessels to depart for distant seas after 
these unhappy difficulties had broken out at home, the 
omission to put in repair and commission, ready for 
orders, a single one of the twenty-eight ships dismantled 
and unfit for service, in our own ports, and that, too, 
while $646,639.79 of the appropriation for repairs in the 
navy, the present year, remained unexpended, were, in 
the opinion of the committee, grave errors, without 
justification or excuse." 



THE GREAT REBELLION. 19 

All these, and many other like wicked acts, w£re 
being committed under the eye and with the knowledge 
of President Buchanan, and by officers whom he had 
the power to displace at any moment, and yet he never 
raised his hand to prevent or check them. 

There were a few leading and influential men in the 
slave States, slaveholders themselves, who wiser than 
the rest, were opposed to secession .and the disruption 
of the old Union, but were soon forced to acquiesce in 
the schemes and movements of the conspirators. They 
were whipped into the ranks of the rebellion. It was 
not sufficient for them to remain silent or neutral, but 
they must be active for treason, or their property and 
lives were at the mercy of a set of fiends who showed 
no mercy. 

Alexander H. Stephens, for many years a member of 
the United States House of Representatives from Geor- 
gia, and one of the most influential men in that State, 
opposed secession. In a speech to an immense gather- 
ing of his constituents at Milledgeville, on the 14th of 
November, 1860, he said: — 

" The first question that presents itself is. Shall the 
people of the South secede from the Union in conse- 
quence of the election of Mr. Lincoln to the Presidency 
of the United States? My countrymen, I tell you 
frankly, candidly, and earnestly, that I do not think 
that they ought. In my judgment, the election of no 
man, constitutionally chosen to that high office, is 
sufficient cause for any State to separate from the Union. 
It ought to stand by and aid still in maintaining the 
Constitution of the country. To make a point of resist- 
ance to the Government — ^to withdraw from it, because a 
man has been constitutionally elected — puts us in the 
wrong. We are pledged to maintain the Constitution. 
Many of us have sworn to support it. Can we,, there- 
fore, for the mere election of a man to the Presidency — 



20 TEE QREAT REBELLION. 

and that, too, in accordance with the prescribed formB 
of the Constitution — make a point of resistance to the 
Government, and without becoming the breakers of 
that sacred instrument ourselves, withdraw ourselves 
from it? "Would we not be in the wrong? Whatever 
fate is to befall this country, let it never be laid to the 
charge of the people of the South, and especially of the 
people of G-eorgia, that we were untrue to our E"ational 
engagements. Let the fault and the wrong rest upon 
others. If all our hopes are to be blasted, if the Eepub- 
lic is to go down, let us be found to the last moment 
standing on the deck, with the Constitution of the 
United States waving over our heads. Let the fanatics 
of the North break the Constitution, if such is their 
fell purpose. Let the responsibility be upon them. I 
shall speak presently more of their acts ; but let not the 
South, let us not be the ones to commit the aggression. 
"We went into the election with this people ; the result 
was different from what we wished; but the election 
has been constitutionally held. "Were we to make a 
point of resistance to the Government, and go out of 
the Union on that account, the record would be made 
up hereafter against us. 

"But, it is said, Mr. Lincoln's policy and principles 
are against the Constitution, and that, if he carries 
them out, it will be destructive of our rights. Let us 
not anticipate a threatened evil. If he violates the 
Constitution, then will come our time to act. Do not 
let us break it, because, forsooth, he may. If he does, 
that is the time for us to strike. I think it would be 
injudicious and unwise to do this sooner. I do not 
anticipate that Mr. Lincoln will do anything to jeopard- 
ize our safety or security, whatever may be his spirit to 
do it; for he is bound by the constitutional checks 
which are thrown around him, which, at this time, ren- 
der him powerless to do any great mischief. This shows 



TBE QBEAT REBELLION. 21 

the , wisdom of our Bystem. The President of the 
United States is no Emperor, no Dictator — ^he is clothed 
with no absolute power. He can do nothing unless he 
is backed by power in Congress. The House of Repre- 
sentatives is largely in the majority against him. In 
the Senate, he will also be powerless. There will be a 
majority of four against him: This, after the loss of 
Bigler, Eitch, and others, by the unfortunate dissensions. 
of the Democratic party in their States. Mr. Lincoln 
cannot appoint an officer without the consent of the 
Senate — ^he cannot form a Cabinet without the same 
consent. He will be in the condition of George HI. 
(the embodiment of Toryism), who had to ask the Whigs 
to appoint his Ministers, and was compelled to receive a 
Cabinet utterly opposed to his views ; and so Mr. Lin- 
coln will be cbmpelled to ask of the Senate to choose 
for him a Cabinet, if the Democracy of that body 
choose to put him on such terms. He will be compelled 
to do this, or let the Government stop, if the Ifational 
Democratic men — for that is their name at the Norths- 
the conservative men in the Senate — should so determine. 
Then, how can Mr. Lincoln obtain a Cabinet which 
would aid him, or allow him, to violate the Constitution ? 

*'"Why, then, I say, should we disrupt the bonds of 
this Union, when his hands are tied — ^when he can do 
aothing against us ? 

** I believe in the power of the people to govern them- 
selves when wisdom prevails, and passion is silent. 
Look at what has already been done by them for their 
advancement in all that ennobles man. There is nothing 
like it in the history of the" world. Look abroad, from 
one extent of the country to the other ; contemplate our 
greatness : we are now among the first nations of the 
earth. Shall it, then, be said that our institutions, 
founded upon principles of self-government, are a 
failure ? 



22 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

" Thus far it is a noble example, worthy of imitation. 
The gentleman (Mr. Cobb), the other night, said it had 
proven a failure. A failure in what? In growth? 
Look at our expanse in National power? Look at our 
population and increase in all that makes a people 
great! A failure? Why, we are the admiration of the 
civilized world, and present the brightest hopes of 
mankind. 

" Some of our public men have failed in their aspira- 
tions; that is true; and from that comes a great part of 
our troubles. 

"No! there is no failure of this Government yet. 
"We have made great advancement under the Constitu- 
tion ; and I cannot but hope that we shall advance still 
higher. Let us be true to our cause." 

Early in January, 1861, Georgia passed an act of 
secession, and joined the other States that had with- 
drawn from the Union ; and in February, Mr. Stephens 
accepted the office of Vice-President of the new Con- 
federacy, and traversed the Slave States, and exerted all 
his powers to rouse the people to war against the gov- 
ernment of the United States. 

The first plan of the rebels was to break up the gov- 
ernment of the United States,, take possession of its 
capital, navy yards, armories, arsenals, and fortifica- 
tions, preparatory for the outbreak. When all this was 
done it was supposed there would be but a feeble resist- 
ance on the part of the people of the North. The 
government was to be reorganized, with slavery estab- 
lished in all the States and Territories, and Jefferson 
Davis as its head. All arrangements for carrying out 
this scheme had been deliberately and carefally made, 
and were apparently near consummation, before the 
people of the North could be made to comprehend the 
possibility of such a movement by any considerable 
portion of the people of the Slave States. 



TEE GREAT REBELLION. 23 

One part of this most wicked and damnable plot was 
to assassinate President Lincoln as he passed through 
Baltimore, on his way to Washington, to be inaugurat- 
ed. It was discovered in season, however, to prevent 
such a great calamity to the country. He left his home 
at Springfield, 111., on the 11th of February, accompa- 
nied by his family and a few friends. At all the cjties 
and large towns on his route the people assembled and 
gave him most enthusiastic receptions, and he replied to 
addresses of welcome at several different places. At 
Columbus, Ohio, he said : 

" I have not maintained silence from any want of real 
anxiety. It is a good thing that there is no more than 
anxiety; for there is nothing going wrong. It is a con- 
soling circumstance that, when we look out, there is. 
nothing that really hurts anybody. "We entertain differ- 
ent views upon political questions : but nobody is suffer- 
ing anything. This is a most consoling circumstance ; 
and from it we may conclude that all we want is time, 
patience, and a reliance on that God who has never for- 
saken this people." 

At Pittsburgh, Pa., on the 15th, he said: 

" Notwithstanding the troubles across the river [the 
speaker pointing southwardly across the Monongahela, 
and smiling], there is no crisis but an artificial one. 
What is there now to warrant the condition of affairs 
presented by our friends over the river ? Take even 
their own views of the questions involved, and there is 
nothing to justify the course they are pursuing. I 
repeat, then, there is no crisis, except such a one as may 
be gotten up at any time by turbulent men, aided by 
designing politicians. My advice to them, under the 
circumstances, is to keep cool. If the great American 
people only keep their temper both sides of the line, 
the trouble will come to an end, and the question which 
now distracts the country be settled, just as surely as 



24 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

all other difficulties, of a like character, which have orig- 
inated in this Government, have been adjusted. Let 
the people on both sides keep their self-possession, and, 
just as other clouds have cleared away in due time, so 
will this great nation continue to prosper as heretofore." 

At Philadelphia he assisted at the raising of the 
United States flag over Independence Hall, and in reply 
to an address of welcome, said : 

" I have often pondered over the dangers incurred by 
the men who assembled here, and framed and adopted 
that Declaration of Independence. I have pondered 
over the toils that were endured by the officers and 
soldiers of the army who achieved that Independence. 
I have often inquired of myself, what great principle or 
idea it was that kept this confederacy so long together. 
It was not the mere matter of the separation of the 
Colonies from the mother-land ; but that sentiment in 
the Declaration of Independence which gave Liberty, 
not alone to the people of this country, but, I hope, to 
the world, for all future time. It was that which gave 
promise that, in due time, the weight should be lifted 
from the shoulders of all men. This is a sentiment 
embodied in the Declaration, of Independence. Ifow, 
my friends, can this country be saved on that basis ? 
If.it can, I will consider myself one of the happiest 
men in the world, if I can help to save it. If it cannot 
be saved on that ba^is, it will be truly awful. But, if 
this country cannot be saved without giving up that 
principle, I was about to say that I would rather be 
assassinated on this spot than surrender it. Now, in 
my view of the present aspect of affairs, there need be 
no bloodshed or war. There is no necessity for it. I 
am not in favor of such a course; and I may say, in 
advance, that there will be no bloodshed, unless it' be 
forced upon the Government, and then it will be com- 
pelled to act in self-defense." 



TEE GBJEAT BMBELLION. ' 25 

The loyal people of Baltimore had made preparations 
to testify their respect for the Presidentelect, by a large 
gathering, procession, and other . ceremonies, while the 
conspirators had arranged to get up a riot at the depot, 
on his arrival, during which, the President, unarmed 
and unprotected, was to be stabbed or shot. This plan 
was discovered by the police, who informed General 
Scott and senator Seward, and Frederick W. Seward, 
son of the senator, was immediately dispatched to meet 
the President, and inform him of the danger to his life. 
He had a public reception at Harrisburgh, after which, 
with a few of his friends, he retired to his privatft 
apartments at the hotel about six o'clock in the evening, 
and as he was known to be weary, was not interrupted. 
As soon as it was dark, he, in company with Colonel 
Lamon, unobserved, entered a back and drove to the 
Pennsylvania railroad, where a special train waa waiting 
for him. The telegraph wires were in the mean time 
cut, so that the knowledge of his departure, if discov- 
ered or suspected, could not be sent abroad. The train 
reached Philadelphia at halfipast ten o'clock that night. 
They drove immediately across the city to the Balti- 
more and "Washington depot, The regular night tra;in 
was just leaving, at a quarter past eleven. They took 
berths in a sleeping'Car, and, without any change, pass- 
ed directly through Baltimore, and arrived at Washing- 
ton safely and unexpectedly, at half-past six o'clock 
next morning, being the 23d of February. Thus was 
an important part of the scheme of the rebels frustrated, 
and the proposed attempt to seize the capital preven- 
ted by the energy and watchfulness of the friends of 
the incoming administration. 

The conspirators had counted on a divided JiTorth, 
believing there were many friends of their cherished 
institution here who would join them in their rebellion 



26 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

against the government. Here, again, they made a, 
great mistake; for when the people of the Free States 
were aware of the wicked plot to break up the TJnion, 
and the extent of it, they arose as one man to meet the 
emergency; and the Northern men, with Southern 
sympathies, found themselves in a most disgraceful 
and hopeless minority. And the plan to invade the 
Northern States had to be abandoned, while General 
Scott, contrary to the wish of President Buchanan, who 
seemed to be completely under control of the slave 
power, had gathered nearly three hundred troops in and 
about the capital for its protection. 

On the retirement of the traitor Floyd jfrom the "War 
Department, Hon. Joseph Holt, of Kentucky, was 
appointed to fill the place. He cooperated with Gen- 
eral Scott in the adoption of vigorous measures for the 
protection of "Washington from the menaced capture by 
the rebels, which greatly alarmed them. On the 18th 
of February, Mr. Holt addressed a letter to President 
Buchanan, in reply to a resolution of the House of 
Representatives, inquiring into the state of the defenses 
of "Washington, from which the following extracts are 
made: 

" The scope of the question submitted by the House 
will be sufficiently met by dealing with the facts as they 
exist, irrespective of the cause from ' which they have 
proceeded. That revolution has been distinguished by 
a boldness and completeness of success rarely equalled 
in the history of civil commotions. Its overthrow of 
the Federal authority has not only been sudden and 
widespread, but has been marked by excesses which 
have alarmed all, and been sources of profound humil- 
iation to a large portion of the American people. Its 
history is a; history of surprises and treacheries, and 
ruthless spoliations. The forts of the United States 
have been captured and garrisoned, and hostile flags 



THE GREAT REBELLION. 27 

unfurled upon their ramparts. Its arsenals have been 
seized, and the vast amount of public arms they con- 
tained appropriated to the use of the captors; while 
more than half a million of dollars, found in the mint 
at I^ew Orleans, have been unscrupulously applied to 
replenish the coffers of Louisiana. Officers in command 
of revenue cutters of the United States have been pre- 
vailed on to violate their trusts, and surrender the prop- 
erty in their charge; and instead of being branded for 
their crimes, they and the vessels they betrayed have 
been cordially received into the service of the seceded 
States." 

After reiterating the acts of the conspirators, the 
information that had reached his department upon the 
subject, the necessity for immediate and decided action, 
and telling the President what steps he had taken to 
save the government from humiliation and disgrace. 
Secretary Holt closes his letter as follows : 

"Already this display of life and loyalty on the part 
of your administration has produced the happiest 
effects. Public confidence has been restored, and the 
feverish apprehension, which it was so mortifying to con- 
template, has been banished. Whatever may have been 
the machinations of deluded, lawless men, the execu- 
tion of their purposes has been suspended, if not alto- 
gether abandoned, in view of preparations, which 
announce more impressively than words, that this 
administration is alike able and resolved to transfer in 
peace to th*e President elect the authority that, under 
the Constitution, belongs to him. To those, if such 
there be, who desire the destruction of the republic, the 
presence of these troops is necessarily offensive. But 
those who sincerely love our institutions, cannot fail to 
rejoice that, by this timely precaution, they have prob- 
ably escaped the deep dishonor which they must have 
suffered had the capital, like the forts and arsenals of 



28 THE QREAT REBELLION. 

the South, fallen into the hands of revolutionists, who 
have found this great government weak, only because, 
in the exhaustless beneficence of its spirit, it has refased 
to strike, even in its own defense, lest it should wound 
the aggressors." 

One Breshwood, a Virginian, who was in command 
of the revenue cutter McLelland, infamously surrender- 
ed his vessel to the rebels at New Orleans; and Captain 
Morrison surrendered the revenue cutter Cass to the 
rebels at Mobile. The rebels seized Fort Morgan at 
Mobile, and called upon Lieutenant John N. Maffit, who 
was in command of the Crusader, which was exposed 
to the fire of the fort, to surrender his vessel to the 
" Alabama Navy." The noble lieutenant replied, " I may 
be overpowered; but in that event, what will be left of 
the Crusader will not be worth taking." He saved his 
vessel, which afterwards rendered signal service in the 
Gulf. 

On the 3d of February, 186.1, Lieutenant J. H. Hamil- 
ton, of South Carolina, ordered Captain Porter to sur- 
render his ship to the rebels. The following is Captain 
Porter's noble reply : "You, sir, have called upon your 
brother officers, not only to become traitors to their 
country, but to betray their sacred trust, and deliver up 
the ships under their command. This infamous appeal 
would, in ordinary times, be treated with the contempt 
it deserves. But I feel it a duty I owe myself, and 
brother officers with whom I am associated, to reply and 
state, that all under my command are true aad loyal to 
the ' Stars and Stripes,' and to the Constitution. My 
duty is plain before me. The constitutional govern- 
ment of the United States has entrusted me with the 
command of this beautiful ship, and before I will per- 
mit any other flag than the ' Stars and Stripes' to fly at 
her peak, I will fire a pistol into her magazine, and blow 
her up. This is my answer to your infamous letter." 



THE OBEAT REBELLION. 29 

For a few days before the inauguration, "Washington 
was fall of rumors of plots to prevent by violence its 
consummation. General Scott and Secretary Holt had 
been bending all their energies to gather a military force 
sufficient to keep in check, or suppress, if it should show 
itself, any lawless demonstration, and to insure peace 
and quiet. A.n imposing military escort was provided 
to attend the Priesident to the Capitol-, and after the cer- 
emonies, to the White House. 

The procession, consisting of civilians, about one 
thousand regulars, and a considerable force of uniform- 
ed militia, escorted the retiring and incoming Presi- 
dents, who were in the same carriage, to the Capitol. 
On the spacious eastern portico of the Capitol a plat- 
form had been erected, the space in front of which was 
occupied by the military. The platform was occupied 
by the Supreme Court, members of the Senate and 
House of Kepresentatives, foreign ministers, and an 
immense crowd of privileged persons. The President 
elect was introduced by Colonel Edward D. Baker, sen- 
ator from Oregon, and was received with cheers from 
but a small share of the thirty thousand persons assem- 
bled. Mr. Lincoln, in a clear, firm and penetrating 
voice, delivered his inaugural address, which closed 
with the following paragraphs : 

" My countrymen, one and all, think calmly and well 
upon this whole subject. E'othing valuable can be lost 
by taking time. 

"If there be an object to hurry any of you, in hot 
haste, to a step which you would never take deliberate- 
ly, that object will be frustrated by taking time ; but no 
good object can be frustrated by it. 

" Such of you as are now dissatisfied still have the 
old Constitution unimpaired, and, on the sensitive point, 
the laws of your own framing under it; while the new 
administration will have no immediate power, if, it 
would, to change either. 



30 THE GREAT BEBELLION. 

" If it were admitted that you who are dissatisfied hold 
the right side in the dispute, there is still no single reason 
for precipitate action. Intelligence, patriotism, Qhiia- 
tianity, and a firm reliance on Him who has never yet 
forsaken this favored land, are still competent to adjust, 
in the best way, all our present difficulties. 

" In your hands, my dissatisfied fellow-countrymen, 
and not in mine, is the momentous issue of civil war. 
The government will not assail you. 

"You can have no conflict without being yourselves 
the aggressors. Tou can have no oath registered in 
heaven to destroy the government, while I shall have 
th« most solemn one to 'preserve, protect, and defend 
it.' 

"I am loath to close. "We are not enemies but 
friends. "We must not be enemies. Though passion 
may have strained, it must not break our bonds of affec- 
tion. 

"The mystic chords of memory, stretching from- 
every battle-field and patriot grave to every living heart 
and hearthstone all over this broad land, will yet swell 
the chorus of the Union when again touched, as surely 
they will be, by the better angels of our nature." 

The oath of office was administered by Chief Justice 
Taney ; the procession was re-formed, and escorted 
President Lincoln to the "White House. Although 
there were many low threats, open and implied, the 
arrangements were so admirably made and carried out 
by the loyal men at the capital, that everything con- 
nected with the ceremonies of inauguration passed off 
without interruption or disturbance. 

The next day after his inauguration, President Lin- 
coln submitted to the Senate the names of the gentle- 
men whom he had appointed as his Cabinet officers, as 
follows: "William H. Seward, of New York, Secretary 
of State; Salmon P. Chase, of Ohio, Secretary of the 



THE QBE AT REBELLION. 31 

Treasury; Simon Cameron, of Pennsylvania, Secretary 
of "War; Grideon "Welles, of Connecticut, Secretary of 
tlie Navy ; Caleb B. Smith, of Indiana, Secretary of 
the Interior; Edward Bates, of Missouri, Attorney 
General; Montgomery Blair, of Maryland, Postmaster 
General. 

The rebel capital was established at Montgomery, 
Alabama. Jefferson Davis had already appointed his 
Cabinet, as follows : Robert Toombs, of Georgia, Secre- 
tary of State; Charles G. Memminger, of South Caro- 
lina, Secretary of the Treasury; Leroy Pope "Walker, of 
Alabama, Secretary of War; Stephen R. Mallory, of 
Florida, Secretary of the IsTavy; John H. Eeagan, of 
Texas, Postmaster General. 

Thus were the two governments organized. Presi- 
dent Lincoln and a majority of his Cabinet hoped that 
all differences between the self-styled Confederate gov- 
ernment and the government of the United States would 
be adjusted without a resort to arms ; while Jefferson 
Davis's government, which by tliis time had relinquish- 
ed the idea of a revolution, and set themselves up as 
independent States, asked only to be let alone, to be 
allowed to possess all the property of the United States 
that they had stolen, and to be acknowledged as inde- 
pendent States. "While the Confederate States claimed 
the right to secede from the Union, and set up a govern- 
ment bf their own, the government of the United States 
denied that right, and claimed that tjiey were still part 
of the Union, and subject to its Constitution and laws. 

Major Robert Anderson, with a mere handful of 
men, — not more than eighty in all, — was placed in 
charge of the fortifications in Charleston harbor. They 
mainly tenanted Fort Moultrie, — ^the older and weaker 
of them, — ^being the most convenient to the city; but it 
could not have been held twenty-four hours against a 
serious assault. Its garrison was surrounded by a 



32 TSE GREAT MBBELLIOK 

numerous and frowning foe. During the night of the 
?Mh. of December, 1860, Major Anderson prudently 
transfeTred Ms entire force to Fort Sumter, — the most 
impregnable of all the forts in the harbor, — ^taking such 
munitions and provisions as he could, destroying the 
rest, and spiking the guns, so that they could not be 
used by the rebels" against Sumter. This was a great 
surprise to the rebels, and they complained of it as a 
breach of faith, as it was alleged that President Buchan- 
an had promised that the military status should not be 
changed without due notice. On the 27th, — the next 
day after the evacuation by Major Anderson, — the rebels 
seized Forts Moultrie and Pickens ; and about the same 
time the Federal arsenal at Charleston, containing many 
thousand stands of arms and a large quantity of military 
stores, was seized by the volunteers flocking to that city, 
by direction of the State authorities. Castle Pinckney, 
Fort Moultrie, and Sullivan's Island were now occupied 
by the rebels, and their defenses enlarged and improved, 
while the custom-house, post-office, and other govern- 
ment buildings were- likewise appropriated, without re- 
sistance, the Federal officers there all being" secessionists, 
and the, palmetto flag raised over them. Iron-clad bat- 
teriel had been erected in such number as to command 
all the entrances to Charleston harbor, so that no 
wooden frigate could pass them, and precluded the pos- 
sibility of sending reenforcements or supplies to Fort 
Sumter. The Star of the "West was sent from 'Sew 
York with reenforcements and supplies on the 5th of 
January, which fact was telegraphed by conspirators to 
their friends in Charleston. She appeared off the bar 
at Charleston on the 9th, and, when nearing Fort Sum- 
ter, was fired upon from Fort Moultrie and Morris's 
Island, and was struck by one shot. "Without commu- 
nicating with Major Anderson, she put about, and 
steered for ISTew York. This was the last attempt made 



TSE QBE AT REBELLION. 33 

to relieve Major Anderson in Ms most einbarrassed 
condition, until eaa:ly in April, after tlie inauguration 
of tlie new government, wlien vessels laden witli pro- 
■visions were sent from !New York, and arrived off the 
bar on the 12tli, the day on which fire was opened upon 
Sumter. The fleet also returned to lifew York with- 
out fulfilling its mission, only having communicated 
with Major Anderson by signals. 

Such was the situation of affairs on the 12th day of 
April, 1861, when the rebels of South Carolina opened 
the most wicked and causeless war upon their govern- 
ment ever recorded in history. In the four succeeding 
years events of immense magnitude and importance 
transpired, affecting more or less seriously every nook 
and corner of our widely extended country, and carry- 
ing sadness and mourning to almost every fireside in 
the land. 

On the 11th, General Beauregard demanded the 
surrender of Fort Sumter to the Confederate Govern- 
ment, which Major Anderson declined to do, but sug- 
gested that he would very soon be starved out, if 
supplies were not sent him. General Beauregard then 
asked of Major Anderson to state at what time he 
would evacuate Fort Sumter, if unmolested; and 
was answered that he would do so at noon on the 
15th, " should I not receive, prior to that time, (ion- 
trolling instructions from my government, or addi- 
tional supplies." This reply was not satisfactory ; and, 
at 3.20, A. M., on the 12th, Major Anderson was 
notified that fire would be opened on Fort Sumter in 
one hour. 

At the appointed moment the bombardment com- 
menced. Fire was almost simultaneously opened 
from Fort Moultrie, an iron-clad fioating battery in the 
harbor, Cummings Point, and Mount Pleasant. Fifty 



34 TEE QBE AT REBELLION. 

breaching cannon playing upon the fort, followed by 
the crashing and crumbling of brick, stone, and mor- 
tar, admonished Major Anderson and his small force 
of seventy true men, that their stay in the fort must 
be short, unless relieved by a more powerful fleet 
than our government then possessed. At seven o'clock, 
after breakfast, — the principal part of which was 
salt pork, — the command was divided into three re- 
liefs, each in succession to man the guns for four 
hours* Captain Arthur Doubleday was in command 
of the first squad, and fired the first gun, which was 
directed upon Fort Moultrie. Major Anderson had 
determined to make the best resistance in his power, 
though fally aware that the fort must soon succumb 
to the greatly superior force with which he had to 
contend, while he took the greatest care that his men 
should be exposed as little as possible to the shot and 
shells of the enemy,, which were falling in every direc- 
tion around them. 

Red-hot shot and bursting shells soon set the 
wooden barracks on fire, and nearly the whole interior 
of the fort blazed like a furnace. For thirty-six hours 
the terrific bombardment continued with but occasional 
lulls. The garrison in Sumter soon became so ex- 
hausted that' they could make but a feeble response. 
The scene inside the fort is described by an eye-witness 
as follows : -^ 

" The fire surrounded us on all sides. Fearful that 
the walls might crack, and the shells pierce and pros- 
trate them, we commenced taking the powder out of 
the magazine before the fire had fully enveloped it. 
We took ninety-six barrels of powder out, and threw 
them into the ,sea, leaving two hundred barrels in it. 
Owing to a lack of cartridges, we kept five men inside 
the magazine, serving as we wanted them, thus using 
up our shirts, sheets, blankets, and all the available 



TSE GREAT REBELLION. 35 

material in tlie fort. WTien we were finally obliged to 
close the magazine, and our material for cartridges 
was exhausted, we were left destitute of any means to 
continue the contest. "We had eaten our last biscuit 
thirty-Six hours before. "We came very near being 
stifled with the dense, livid smoke from the burning 
buildings. Many of the men lay prostrate on the 
ground, with wet handkerchiefs over their mouths and 
eyes, gasping for breath. It was a moment of immi- 
nent peril. If ah eddy of wind had not ensued, we all 
probably should have been suffocated. The crashing 
of the shot, the bursting of the shells, the falling of the 
walls, and the roar of the flames, made a Pandemonium 
of the fort. "We, nevertheless, kept up a steady fire." 

On the afternoon of the second day of the bombard- 
ment, Louis T. Wigfall, late a "United States senator 
from Texas, made his appearance in a small boat, with 
a white fiag, and was admitted; and in a conference 
with Major Anderson and his officers, insisted that 
farther resistance was useless. The fort was on fire, 
the garrison exhausted, with the Stars and Stripes float- 
ing defiantly over the ruins. Another deputation soon 
arrived, "Wigfall having failed to agree with Major 
Anderson on the terms for a surrender. After some 
conference, it was agreed that the garrison should sur- 
render the fort, taking with them, as they retired at 
their leisure, and in their own way, all their individual 
and company property, their side arms, and their tat- 
tered flag, which they were to salute with a hundred 
guns, before they hauled it down. 

The battle ceased ; the fire was extinguished, after 
destroying almost everything combustible in the fort. 
Next morning, about nine o'clock, the evacuation com- 
menced and the guns of the fort boomed a salute to the 
lowering flag, which had been so bravely defended 
against the unequal foe. The garrison marched out of 



36 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

the main gate, preceded by the band, playing "Yankee 
Doodle" and "Hail Columbia," with the Stars and 
Stripes floating over them. They embarked on board 
the United States ship Baltic, and were carried to ISTew 
York, where they met with an enthusiastic reception. 

That seven thousand well drilled men, with all the 
needed appliances, could overcome seventy, out of pro- 
visions, — ^for they had eaten their last biscuit, — and 
nearly destitute of ammunition, and with no hope of 
succor, was regarded by the chivalry of South Carolina 
as a most wonderful and glorious victory, and as 
establishing beyond dispute the independence of the 
Confederacy. 

Arrived at 'Bew York, Major Anderson dispatched 
to his government the following report : — 

" Steamship Baltic, off Sandy Hook, 
April 18, 1861. 
" The Hon. S. Camekon, 

" Secretary of War, Washington, D. Q. 
" Sir : Having defended Fort Sumter for thirty-four 
bours, until the the quarters were entirely burned, the 
main gates destroyed, the gorge wall seriously injured, 
the magazine surrounded by flames, and its door closed 
from the effects of the heat, four barrels and three 
cartridges of powder only being available, and no 
provisions but pork remaining, I accepted terms of 
evacuation offered by General Beauregard (being the 
same offered by him on the 11th instant, prior to the 
commencement of hostilities), and marched out of the 
fort on Sunday afternoon, the 14th instant, with colors 
flying and drums beating, bringing away company and 
private property, and saluting my flag with fifty guns. 
"Robert Anderson, 

" Major First Artillery." 



TEE GREAT REBELLION. 37 

On the next day after the evacuation of Eort Sumter, 
April 15, President Lincoln issued a call for seventy- 
five thousand volunteers for three months' service, and 
called an extra session of Congress to meet on the 
ensuing 4th of July. The uprising of the freemen of ' 
the North was such as the world neyer witnessed before. 
The insult to the old honored flag created a feeling of 
the most intense indignation, and all party lines seemed 
for the time obliterated, and two parties only had an 
existence, — those who would destroy the Union, on the 
one hand, and t]jose who would defend and preserve 
it, at any cost, on the other. . 

There were many who believed that the state of feel- 
ing which had resulted in an open rebellion of the 
slaveholders against the government, had been pro- 
duced by extremists both at the North and the South, 
instead of attributing the difficulty to its true cause, — 
the wide difference between a society of educated free 
men and a society of slaveholders and slaves, T<^her< 
only the few were educated; but there were none ir 
the free States who openly justified the assault upon 
Fort Sumter. 

On the 15th of April the President promulgated the 
following 

" Proclamation. 

" "Whereas, the laws of the United States have been 
for some time past, and now are, opposed, and the 
execution thereof obstructed, in the States of South 
Carolina, G-eorgia, Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Lou- 
isiana, and Texas, by combinations, too powerful to be 
suppressed by the ordinary course of judicial proceed- 
ings, or by the powers vested in the marshals by law : 
Now, therefore, I, Abraham Lincoln, President of the 
United Stiates, in virtue of the power in me vested by 
the constitution and the laws, have thought fit to call 



38 THE ORE AT REBELLION. 

fortli tte militia of the several States of the Union, to 
the aggregate number of seventy-five thousand, in 
order to suppress said combinations, and to cause the 
laws to be duly executed. 

" The details of this object will be immediately com- 
municated to the State authorities, through the "War 
Department. I appeal to all loyal citizens to favor, 
facilitate, and aid this effort to maintain the honor, the 
integrity, and existence of our national Union, and the 
perpetuity of popular government, and to redress wrongs 
already long enough endured. I deem it proper to say, 
that the first service assigned to the forces hereby called 
forth, will probably be to repossess the forts, places, and 
property which have been seized from the Union. And, 
in every event, the utmost care will be observed, consis- 
tently with the objects aforesaid, to avoid any devastar- 
tion, any destruction of, or interference with, properly, 
or any disturbance of peaceful citizens of any part of the 
country. And I hereby command the persons compris- 
ing the combinations aforesaid to disperse, and retire 
peaceably to their respective abodes, within twenty days 
from this date. 

" Deeming that the present condition of public affairs 
presents an extraordinary occasion, I do hereby, by vir- 
tue of the power in me vested by the Constitution, con- 
vene both Houses of Congress. The Senators and 
Representatives are, therefore, summoned to assemble 
at their respective chambers, at twelve o'clock, noon, on 
Thursday, the fourth day of July next, then and there 
to consider and determine such measures as, in their 
wisdom, the public safety and interest may seem to 
demand. 

" In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand, 
and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed. 

" Done at the city of "Washington, the fifteenth day 
of April, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight 



THE GREAT REBELLION. 39 

hundred and sixty-one, and of the independence of the 
United States the eighty-fifth. 

"Abraham Lincoln. 
" By the President : 

"William H. ^wiiri.-&D, Secretary of Stcde." 

"With this proclamation, was sent from the War De- 
partment, to the Governors of the several States, a cir- 
cular, explaining that the call was for regiments of 
infantry, or riflemen only, each regiment to he composed 
of seven hundred and eighty men. They were appor- 
tioned to the several States as follows : Maine, JSTew 
Hampshire, Vermont, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Dela- 
ware, Arkansas, Michigan, Iowa, Minnesota, and Wis- 
consin, one each ; Massachusetts, Tennessee, and N"orth 
Carolina, two each; IfTew. Jersey, Maryland, Missouri 
and Kentucky, four each ; Indiana and Illinois, six each ; 
]!^ew York, seventeen; Pennsylvania, sixteen ; and Ohio, 
thirteen. These ninety-four regiments would make a 
total of seventy-three thousand three hundred and twenty 
men. The residue of the seventy-five thousand was to 
be furnished by the District of Columbia. 

The Governors of the States of Virginia, K'orth Caro- 
lina, Tennessee, Missouri and Kentucky utterly refused 
to farnish any men for the purpose namedin the proc- 
lamation. The response of Governor Harris, of Ten- 
nessee, was as foUows, and may be taken as a fair sample 
of the replies from the Govemers of all the ahove-named 
States : — 

" Tennessee will not fiimish a single man for coercion ; 
but fifty thousand, if necessary for the defense of our 
rights, and those of our irethren." 

Governor Jackson, of Missouri, in reply to the call, 
said, — 

"It is illegal, unconstitutional, revolutionary, inhu- 
man, diabolical, and cannot be complied with. Not one 



40 TME GREAT REBELLION. 

man will the State of Missouri furnisli to carry on so 
unholy a crusade." 

Governor Burton, of Delaware, took until the 26th 
of April to consider the matter, and then replied, that 
"The laws of this State do not confer upon the Execu- 
tive any authority alUowing him to comply with such 
requisition." 

Governor Hicks, of Maryland, though claiming to be 
a Unionist himself, and that his State was still in the 
TJnion, gave the Union cause but a very cold, support 
when called upon for troops to uphold it. On the 18th 
of April he issued a proclamation to the people of Mary- 
land, assuring them that he should do all in his power 
to preserve " the honor and integrity of the State, and 
to maintain within her limits that peace so earnestly 
desired by all good citizens." And adding, " Ifo troops 
will be sent from Maryland, unless it may be for the 
defense of the national capital." 

On the 17th of April, Jefferson Davis, the head of a 
band of conspirators and rebels, issued a proclamation, 
authorizing privateers to be fitted out from all parts of 
the South, to prey upon the commerce of the United 
States, and this, too, when the N^orth had been rdtbed 
by these conspirators of its entire naval force, and had 
not half a dozen vessels which could be called into our 
waters to protect our merchant marine. 

As a protection against this piratical proclamation, 
President Lincoln, on the 19th of April, announced the 
blockade of all ports of the seceded States. As if by 
magic a naval force sprang into existence, and in. less 
than ninety days over three hundred armed vessels of 
war were sailing beneath the Stars ar^ Stripes, with 
brave men upon their decks, ready to avenge any insult 
to their honored flag. 

About this time there was a determination on the 
part of leading rebels to capture the City of Washing- 



TEE GREAT REBELLION. 41 

ton at all hazards. Tlie Eichinoiid Examiner, of April 
23d, said, " The capture of Washington City is perfe„„l/ 
within the power of Virginia and Maryland, if Virginia 
will only make the effort by her constituted authorities. 
The entire population pant for the onset. Our people 
can take it; they will take it; and Scott, the arch- 
traitor, and Lincohi, the beast, combined, cannot pre- 
vent it." 

It has been conclusively proved that the following 
was the plot for the capture of the capital of the nation, 
with all the public property. A conspiracy was formed 
by leading Virginians, with prominent secessionists in 
Washington, and a band of traitors of influence and 
wealth in Baltimore, to accomplish the infamous and 
cowardly act in the following manner : Virginia did not 
then pretend to be out of the Union, and was fully rep- 
resented in both branches of Congress. The Virginians, 
at the head of between two and three thousand desperate 
men, were to make a descent rfpon Harper's Ferry, seize 
the arsenal there, which contained twenty-five thousand 
stand of arms, and thus supply themselves with an abund- 
ance of weapons and ammunition. They were then to 
descend the Potomac to "Washington, and make a fierce 
onset in the streets of the city. Traitors there, in. strong 
bands, armed to the teeth, were prepared to receive them. 
Incendiaries were designated to fire the city at several 
points. Amid the terror and confusion of this sudden 
assault, the conspirators were to seize the most import- 
ant government buildings, and convert them into for- 
tresses, where they could defy any immediate attack 
from the bewildered government, and whence they could 
command the city. 

While all this was being done, the conspirators in 
Baltimore were to cut off all communication with the 
North, by burning bridges, tearing up railways, and 
seizing the post-office and telegraph stations. Should 



42 TSS QBE AT REBELLION. 

troops attempt to reach "Washington from the North, 
a mob was to destroy them in the streets of Baltimore. 
Troops were to rush from the South to the captured 
city, and occupy all important military stations. Vir- 
ginia and Maryland were thus to be dragged into seces- 
sion, .and "Washington was to be the capital of the 
Southern Confederacy. 

"When this damnable plot was discovered, just on the 
eve of its execution, it seemed almost impossible for the 
government to thwart it. Washington was filled with 
traitors and rebels ; no reliance could be placed upon 
the militia ; Southern traitors were occupying the most 
important posts in the army, and the government did 
not know who could be trusted. The government 
peemed surrounded with difficulties, from which there 
appeared to be no way of extrication ; and the North, 
though burning to avenge the insult upon the flag in 
the unprovoked attack upon Sumter, had not begui^ to 
comprehend the extent of the danger to the national 
capital, and it is doubtful if they do now, or ever will, 
since the government passed the crisis more easily than 
the most sanguine had reason to hope it would. 

This plot was made known on the 18th of April, con- 
fidentially, to the loyal people of "Washington, and gen- 
tlemen temporarily there, who were known to be friends 
of the Union. A gentleman who was there, and took 
part in the transactions, says, — 

" A few trusty friends of the government, visitors in 
"Washington, immediately commenced vigorous, but 
secret measures, to assist the administration in this 
fearful crisis. They hastened, by committees, to all the 
hotels, and sought out those known to be true to the 
"Union, informed them of the peril, and appointed a 
meeting that very evening, in the church in the rear of 
"Willard's Hotel, where they would not attract attention. 
Solemnly, and with intense emotion, they administered 



THE QBE AT REBELLION. 43 

the oatli anew, of fidelity to tlie national flag, to every 
one to whom they confided the secret, and then gave to 
each the pass which would admit him to the church. 
This work was speedily accomplished, for there was not 
a moment to he lost, and soon ahout two hundred men 
were assembled in the church. 

" After listening to a few words of eloquence, which 
yet burn in the souls of some of the volunteers in that 
dark night of the nation's peril, the company formed 
themselves into the noted ' Cassius M. Clay Battal- 
ion.' These noble men, many of whom were among 
the most distinguished for wealth and position to be 
found in our land, were enrolled under efficient officers 
into small patrol parties, and marched all night long 
through the streets of the city, to guard against incendi- 
aries, and to prevent the assembling of conspirators. 
They had orders to shoot down promptly any who should 
resist their authority." 

Another party of three hundred men were also ap- 
pointed, under G-eneral Lane, to go unobserved to the 
White House, and bivouac in the East Room, ready to 
give a warm reception to any parties who might make 
a sudden attack upon the Presidential Mansion. For 
three weeks the East Room was thus occupied. Gren- 
eral Scott promptly took unobserved possession of the 
Capitol, with a sufficient number of men to maintain a 
desperate defense, where were deposited great quanti- 
ties of military stores and provisions. Thus was the 
White House and the Capitol to be held until troops 
from the North could fight their way through Maryland 
for their rescue if besieged. The greatest care was exer- 
cised by the government to guard against surprise. 

At ten o'clock, on the night of the 19th, Lieutenant 
Jones, of the United States army, who was in command 
at Harper's Ferry, with but forty-three men, received 
reliable information that Governor Letcher, of Virginia, 



44 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

had sent three thousand State troops, via Winchester, 
and that they would reach Harper's Ferry in two hours; 
and that three hundred troops, from Hallstown, were 
within twenty minutes' march of the arsenal. Combus- 
tibles had been previously prepared, and everything in 
readiness to blow up the arsenal and other buildings of 
the armory, should he find the enemy coming upon him 
in overwhelming numbers. In a trice the torch was 
applied, and the buildings were all in a blaze, and Lieu- 
tenant Jones, with his forty-three men, retreated across 
the bridge into Maryland, and, after marching all night, 
reached Carlisle, Pennsylvania, where they were safe 
from attack from the traitors. The secessionists at the 
Ferry rushed to the arsenal, and vainly attempted to 
extinguish the flames. In their rage, they pursued the 
heroic band, and, firing upon them, killed two of their 
number. Before morning nearly five thousand Virginia 
troops were in possession of the ruins at Harper's Ferry. 

On the 17th of April, a convention in Virginia secretly 
passed an ordinance of secession, which was for a time 
kept from the knowledge of the community, that more 
effectual measures might be adopted for seizing the 
government property and fortifications in that State, 
though a private messenger was sent to inform the 
Confederate government of the action of the convention. 

Government property, to the amount of many millions 
of dollars, was accumulated at IsTorfolk Navy Yard, 
including machine-shops, founderies, store-houses, to- 
gether with immense amounts of naval ,and military 
stores, the whole estimated as worth over nine millions 
of dollars. The new steam-frigate Merrimac, the Penn- 
sylvania, the largest line-of-battle ship in the world, the 
Germantown, the Dolphin, and other war vessels, were 
floating in the harbor. By order of Governor Letcher, 
on the night of the 16th of April, a large number of 
boats, laden with stone, were sunk in the channel, so 



THE GREAT REBELLION. 45 

that these large vessels could not pass out, and arrange- 
ments were made for seizing the yard. Captain 
MeCaulay, who was in command of the yard, and most 
of the sub-officers were traitors. 

It became evident that the yard could not be held, 
but that it must fall into the hands of the rebels, and 
it was determin&l to destroy it; and the steamship 
Pawnee was sent from Fortress Monroe to aid in the 
work. When she appeared at Norfolk, she met with a 
most enthusiastic welcome froiii the crews of the Penn- 
sylvania, and other war vessels lying there. The Pawnee 
arrived, and made fast to the dock at Norfolk about nine 
o'clock on the evening of the 2l8t of April, immediately 
landed her troops, and seized the gates of the yard, so 
that no traitors could enter. Everything of value was 
removed from the Pennsylvania. What could not be 
removed was thrown overboard, and every preparation 
made for a great conflagration. At four o'clock next 
morning, all the men from the yard,' except a few left to 
fire the trains, which had been carefully laid, were taken 
on board the Cumberland and Pawnee, and the former 
took the latter vessel in tow. At a given signal the 
torch was applied, and everything combustible, includ- 
ing the Pennsylvania and several other war vessels, was 
destroyed. 

To put down this well-planned and most wicked 
rebellion, the North, as one man, nobly responded to 
the call of President Lincoln for troops. On the even- 
ing of the eighteenth, four hundred Pennsylvania vol- 
unteers reached Washington. On the same day the 
Sixth Regiment of Massachusetts volunteers left Boston 
for Washington, and arrived at Baltimore on the 19th, 
where they were joined by a regiment from Philadelphia. 
The Philadelphia regiment was without arms, and the 
Sixth Massachusetts was but partially armed. 



46 THE ORE AT REBELLION. 

In passing from one railroad station to another in 
Baltimore, a distance of two and a half miles, the cars 
had to be drawn by horses. The Massachusetts and 
Philadelphia troops occupied seventeen cars. The five 
foi^emost cars, containing a portion of the Massachusetts 
troops, were sent forward. There being .no horses for 
the other cars, the residue of the rl giment, of whom 
but a small portion were armed, left the cars and formed 
in the street, waiting the arrival of horses. ITone came, 
for a secession mob which filled the streets had covered 
the track immediately behind the cars which had been 
sent forward, with heavy timbers, anchors, stones, and 
other obstructions, to prevent the passage of the other 
cars. The residue of the regiment were assailed by the 
mob with showers of stones and other missiles, hurled 
from the streets and house-tops, and several soldiers 
were knocked down and badly injured. In' the confa- 
sion, one of the rioters stepped up behind a young sol- 
dier, seized his gun, and shot him dead. At this the 
soldiers were ordered to fire, and those who had loaded 
muskets obeyed the order, with some effect, which 
caused the mob to recoil. The soldiers, learning that 
the track had been obstructed, commenced their march 
from the Camden to the "Washington depot, surrounded 
and followed by the mob, preceded by Mayor Brown 
and a strong detachment of police. The mob closed in, 
and attempted to cut off a portion of the rear, which be- 
ing hardly pressed was ordered to fire, which they did. 
Several volleys were fired by a small portion of the regi- 
ment, killing eleven and wounding four of the rioters. 
Three soldiers were killed and eight seriously injured. 
The Massachusetts regiment finally reached the Wash- 
ington depot, and were sent forward to the city of 
"Washington. The train was repeatedly fired at from 
the hills and woods along the route, but, providentially, 
no one was injured. The Philadelphia regiment hav- 



TSS GREAT REBELLION. 47 

■j 

ing no arms, after a severe hand-to-hand fight with the 
mob, returned to that city. 

The telegraph wires connecting Baltimore and the 
free States were cut, and the railroad bridges northward 
and north-westward from Baltimore, on the railroads to 
Philadelphia and Harrisburg, were burned, thus shut- 
ting off "Washington from all communication with the 
INorthern States. In the mean time, however, the North 
was making all possible haste in enlisting, arming, 
equipping, and making ready for the field her noble 
and patriotic sons. 



TSE GREAT REBELLION. 49 



ACTION OF NEW HAMPSHIEE. 



PA.RT II. 



T H H] people of K'ew Hampshire, in common with 
those of BTew England, and all the free States, were 
aroused to their utmost by news of the assault upon 
Fort Sumter. The feeling of indignation was intense. 
The flag of the common country had been assaulted by 
insurgents in a State that claimed the right to secede 
from the Union so dear to every loyal citizen of the 
country. A war had been commenced upon the Gov- 
emm.ent of the United States by South Carolina, and it 
only remained for the loyal !N"orth to accept the situa- 
tion. Party lines were for the time forgotten, and men, 
without scarcely an exception, were ready to do their 
utmost to protect and sustain the Government. The 
Capital of the Nation was in danger of capture by the 
rebels, and troops must be sent, without delay, to defend 
it from their threatened attacks. 

Ifew Hampshire had no organized militia that could 
be called into active service. The enrollment required 
"by law had been so imperfect that no fair and equal 



50 TEE &BEAT REBELLION. 

draft could be made upon her citizens liable to be called 
into active service, in case of insurrection at home or 
invasion from abroad, and it only remained for the Gov- 
ernor to call for volunteers to fill the quota of the State-^ 
one regiment of 780 officers and men — ^under the call of 
the President for seventy-five thousand troops for three 
months' service. 

Immediately upon the receipt by telegraph of Presi- 
dent Lincoln's Proclamation, Ichabod Goodwin, then 
Governor, issued the following order : 

STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIEE. 

Executive Department, 1 
Concord, April 16, 1861. / 

To Joseph C. Abbott, Adjutant and Inspector-General of 
the New Hampshire Militia : 

Sir : The President of the United States having, in 
pursuance of the act of Congress approved February 28, 
1795, called upon the State of New Hampshire for a 
regiment of militia, consisting of ten companies of in- 
fantry, to be held in readiness to be mustered into the 
service of the United States for the purpose of quelling 
insurrection and supporting the government : 

I, Ichabod Goodwin, Governor of New Hampshire, 
command you to make proclamation, calling for volun- 
teers from the enrolled militia of this State, to the num- 
ber required, and to issue from time to time all neces- 
sary orders and instructions for enrolling and holding 
in readiness to be mustered into the service of said vol- 
unteer corps, agreeably to the aforesaid requisition. 

ICHABOD GOODWIN, 

Governor and Commander-in-Chi^. 
By the command of the Governor, 

Thomas L. Tullook, Secretary of State. 



ACTION OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 51 

The foregoing was succeeded immediately by the 
following : 

STATE OF NEW HAMPSHIRE. 



Adjutant GTenbeal's Office, \ 
Concord, April 16, 1861. / 



General Ordeb, 
No. 6. 



In pursuance of a proclamation by the President of 
the United States, the Governor of this State, in a pro- 
clamation dated at Concord this day, has ordered the 
enlistment of one regiment of infantry within the State 
of New Hampshire, to be held in readiness for service 
whenever called for. 

The regiment will consist of one Colonel, one Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel, one Major, one Adjutant, one Quarter- 
master,- one Quartermaster-Sergeant, one Paymaster, one 
Surgeon, one Surgeon's Mate, one Chaplain, one Ser- 
geant-Major, one Drum-Major, and one Fife-Major. 

Each company will consist of one Captain, one First 
Lieutenant, one Second Lieutenant, four Sergeants, four 
Corporals, two Musicians, and sixty-four Privates. 

The officers of the volunteers will be commissioned 
according to the laws of the State of New Hampshire. 

None under the rank of commissioned officers will be 
received who are under the age of eighteen or over the 
age of forty-five. 

Volunteers who shall be accepted will be uniformed, 
armed and equipped at the expense of the State, and 
their pay will be the same as that of the corresponding 
rank in the army of the United States^ 

Any military company at present existing, or any 
number of citizens desirous of associating for the sup- 
port of the laws and the defense of their country, or any 



52 TEE GBEAT REBELLION. 

individual desirous of entering upon the service of the 
United States, are requested to report themselves to this 
Department forthwith. 

By order of His Excellency, the Governor and Com- 
mander-in-Chief. 

JOSEPH C. ABBOTT, 

AdjvMnt and Inspector- General. 

To raise the regiment called for from New Hampshire 
by the President's proclamation, in the shortest possible 
time, enlistment papers were immediately issued by the 
Adjutant-General for twenty-eight stations, in different 
parts of the State, and offices were oppned for the en- 
listment of soldiers for three months' service. Col. 
Henry 0. Kent, of Lancaster, Major Frank S. Eiske, 
of Keene, and Col. Jeremiah C. Tilton, of Sanbornton, 
were appointed aids to the Adjutant General, to assist 
in obtaining the requisite, number of men, and send 
them to rendezvous at Concord, as soon as practicable. 
Daily reports were required to be made by the several 
enlisting officers to the Adjutant-General, of the number 
of men enrolled by each, with other needed information. 
The greatest activity and enthusiasm was manifested in 
every part of the State, and almost every farm, work- 
shop and business establishment within her borders, sent 
forth its representative to the field. 

While the men were engaged in the work of raising 
soldiers, the women organized and were making flannel 
shirts, drawers and other articles for the comfort of the 
soldiers in the field, and gathering linen and vsdnding 
bandages for hospitals. Every individual felt that there 
was a duty to perform in the emergency in which the 
country was placed by the action of South Carolina and 
other seceded States of the old Union. Public meetings 
were called in every considerable town, which were 
largely attended by men and women ; patriotic speeches 



THREE MONTHS' TM00P8. 53 

were made and measures taken to encourage enlistments, 
and funds pledged by individuals and towns to assist the 
families of ttose who should go to the field. 

It appearing by reports from the different recruiting 
stations that men enough had been enlisted to fill the 
regiment, orders were issued on the 24th of April to 
take them to Concord, where a camp was established, 
and Col. John H. Gage, of IN'ashua, was ordered to as- 
sume command. The camp was upon the Fair Grounds 
of the Merrimack County Agricultural Society, about a 
mile east from the State House. Col. Gage called it 
" Camp Union," by which name it was afterwards 
known. 

Men were brought in by companies and squads from 
every part of the State, and it was soon found that more 
than enough had assembled to fill the regiment called 
for, when it was determined by the State authorities to 
organize, arm, equip, and make ready for the field, and 
hold subject to orders from the War Department at 
"Washington, two regiments, of seven hundred and 
eighty officers and men each. To this end, after a par- 
tial organization of the first regiment, the residue of 
the men were sent to Portsmouth, with a view to plac- 
ing a portion of them in Fort Constitution to garrison 
that post, which was deemed of importance to the se- 
curity of the sea-coast of the State. Brigadier General 
George Stark, of IN'ashua, was ordered to Portsmouth to 
take charge of the men and the preliminary organization 
of the second regiment, and arrived there on the 30th 
of April. Col. Henry 0. Kent, of Lancaster, was placed 
in charge of the Quartermaster Department. The camp 
at Portsmouth was named " Camp Constitution." 

The following is the whole number of men enlisted 
for three months, between the 17th of April, when the 
first papers were issued, and the 30th of the same month, 
with the places where they were enlisted and the names 



54 



TEE GREAT REBELLION. 



of enlisting officers. This will show that Wew Hamp- 
shire, though with no organized militia which could be 
placed immediately under the orders of the "War Depart- 
ment, like Massachusetts and some of the other States, 
was not behind them in zeal and devotion to the cause 
of the country : 



Townt, 

Concord, 

Salem, 

Bradford, 

Portsmouth, 

Dover, 

Manchester, 

Newport, 

New London, 

Lancaster, 

Laconia, 

Claremont, 

Conway, 

Hampton, 

Peterborough, 

Littleton, 

Plymouth, 

Keene, 

"West Lebanon, 

Contoocookville, 

Nashua, 

North Stratford, 

Exeter, 

Niagara Company, 

Abbott Guards, 

Cheshire Light Guards, 

Mechanics' Phalanx, 

Granite State Guards, 

Milford ComDany, 



EnlisKng Officen. 

E. E. Sturtevant, 
J, D. Drew, 
M. "W. Tappan, 
W. O. Sides, 
G. W. Colbath, 
J. L. Kelley, 
L McL. Barton, 
A. J. Sargent, 
L S. M. Gove, 
W. H. Wyman, 
W. P. Austin, 
Joshua Chapman, 
0. E. Dunbar,. 

E. Weston, 
W. H. Eowell, 
J. H. Thompson, 
H. C. Handerson, 

F. Comings, 

J. N. Patterson, 
E. O. Greenleaf, 
S. E. Chase, 
C. H. Bell, 
A. S. Edgerly, 
"W. H. D. Cochrane, 
T. A. Barker, 
J. N. Bruce, 
Ichabod Pearl, 
George Gillis, 



No. 



Whole number, 



of Mm. 

223 
62 
10 
37 

230 

135 
40 
12 
62 
60 
81 
23 
53 
75 
56 
13 

130 
35 
43 
73 
18 
53 
77 
78 
77 
77 
77 
94 

2004 



Soon after the arrival of the men at Portsmouth, and 
before the organization of the second regiment was com- 
pleted, orders were received by the Governor from the 



THREE MONTHS' TROOPS. 55 

War Department to. hold, in readiness for its call one 
regiment only of three months' men ; and to enlist, or- 
ganize, arm, equip, and' make ready for service one 
regiment, of ten hundred and forty-six officers and men, 
for three years, or during the war. 

On the 19th of May, by direction of the Governor, a 
general order was issued, directing that the opportunity 
to enlist in the three years' regiment should be offered 
first to the three months' men assembled in the camp at 
Portsmouth. Enlistment papers were accordingly dis- 
tributed on the 21st, and four hundred and ninety-six 
of those men who had enlisted for three months, im- 
mediately re-enlisted for three years, or during the war, 
as follows : 

From Claremont Company, 53 

" Lancaster Company, 44 

" Conway Company, 20 

" Milford Company, 21 

" Keene, two companies, 90 

" Laconia Company, 37 

" Littleton Company, 34 

" Portsmouth Company, 70 

" Manchester, two Companies, 71 

" Concord Company, 56 

Whole number, 496 

The men thus re-enlisted, having left their business, 
families and homes, for an absence of three months only, 
were given farloughs of from three to six days, to enable 
them to. make arrangements for such absence as their 
new enlistment involved. The remainder of the men 
enlisted for three months, were then carefully examined 
by a surgeon, a portion of them discharged for disa- 
bility, others at their own request, 274 sent to Port 
Constitution, in Portsmouth harbor, to serve out their 
term of enlistment, and 38 returned to Camp Union, 
Concord. 
Orders had been sent to different recruiting stations 



56 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

to enlist men to fill up the three years' regiment, and on 
the 26th of May they began to arrive at Camp Constitu- 
tion. Between the- 26th and 30th the following reported 
to Gen. Stark : 

Dover Volunteers, Capt. EoUins, 99 

Exeter Volunteers, Capt. Smith, 58 

Hampton Volunteers, Capt. Dunbar, 42 

Rifle Rangers, Manchester, Capt. Carr, 100 
Goodwin Rifles, Concord, Capt. Griffin, 90 
Contoocook Volunteers, Capt. Patterson, 72 
Canaan Volunteers, Capt. Smith, 14 

Peterborough Volunteers, Capt. "Weston, 50 

Whole number, 525 

Re-enlisted men, 496 

1021 
The regiment was soon filled to its maximum number, 
1046, by enlistments, and the work of organizing, officer- 
ing, uniforming, arming, equipping, drilling and mak- 
ing it ready for orders from the War Department, was 
prosecuted with commendable vigor. 

When the men were being enlisted for these two 
regiments, no one either north or south, however well 
informed, seemed to appreciate in the smallest degree 
the magnitude of the war that had been begun at Fort 
Sumter. Many, and indeed most men, believed that 
before our men could be made ready for marching 
orders the rebels would abandon their mad schemes, by 
the operation of the sober second thought, return to their 
homes, and that the service of the 75,000 three months' 
troops called for by the President, would not be re- 
quired ; and hardly any one believed that the two sec- 
tions of the country would met in deadly conflict. A 
few weeks only were required to prove how fallacious 
were all speculatious upon the subject, and how little 
the people of one section of the country knew of the 
temper and disposition of the people of the other section. 



THREE MONTHS' MEN. 57 

FIRST REGIMENT. 



The men rendezvoused at Concord were placed in 
hastily constructed barracks, given plenty of clean straw 
for bedding, and made as comfortable as circumstances 
would admit, though they had to wait some days for 
blankets and other needed articles, with which they were 
afterwards supplied. Their sleeping accommodations 
were very diifferent from what they had been accustomed 
to at home. They submitted with good grace to what 
seemed an imperative necessity, and made themselves 
merry over their beds and sleeping apartments. One 
man from IsTewport, who had been a stage-driver for 
many years, and was somewhat famous in that vicinity 
as a careful, skillful and jolly whip, sent to a fellow 
stage-man the following message : " I want you to send 
me a fork to pitch up my bedding." 

These men were many of them from the best families 
in the State, and enlisted out of motives of pure patriot- 
ism. The country needed their services, and they gave 
them with alacrity, l^o bounties were offered, and the 
-pay to which they were entitled was the same as that of 
private soldiers in the regular army — eleven dollars per 
month. 

The men began to arrive in camp on the 24th of April, 
and -were soon organized into squads and companies, 
temporarily for the purpose of drill, and men designated 
to instruct them, the camp being under the command 
of Col. John H. Gage, of Nashua, who was a year or 
two afterwards killed by the accidental discharge of a 
gun,- while out hunting. The regiment was perma- 
nently organized as follows : 

Colonel, Mason "W. Tappan, of Bradford. 

Lieut. Colonel, Thomas J. "Whipple, of Laconia. 



58 THE QBEAT BEBEILION. 

Major, Aaron F. Stevens, of Nashua. 
Adjutant, Enoch Q. Fellows, of Sandwich. 
Quartermaster, Richard F. Batchelder, of Manchester. 
Paymaster, Moses K. Hazelton, of Bradford. 
Surgeon, Alpheus B. Crosby, of Hanover. 
Asst. Surgeon, Henry 0. Shaw, of Hanover. 
Chaplain, Stephen G. Abbott,* of Bradford. 
Sergt. Major, George Y. Sawyer, of l^ashua. 
Quartermaster Sergt., Albert Lull, of Milford. 
Fife Major, Francis H. Pike, of Manchester. 
Drum Major, "William Carr, of Concord. 

The Company officers were as follows : 

Co. A, Captain, Louis Bell, of Farmington; First 
Lieut., George "W. Colbath, of Dover; Second Lieut., 
Oliver M. Clark, of Dover. 

Co. B, Captain, Daniel E. Kenney, of Sandwich ; First 
Lieut., Charles "W". Sawyer, of Dover; Second Lieut., 
Joseph W. "Wallace, of Dover. 

Co. C, Captain, John L. Kelley; First Lieut., Martin 
V. B. Richardson; Second Lieut., Charles 0. Jennison, 
all of Manchester. 

Co. D, Captain, L:a McL. Barton ; First Lieut., Ed- 
ward !N"ettleton; Second Lieut., Dexter G. Reed, all of 
!N"ewport. 

Co. E, Captain, Richard O. Greenleaf ; First Lieut., 
"William F. Greeley; Second Lieut., John "W. Thomp- 
son, all of E'ashua. 

Co. F, Captain, Augustus S. Edgerly ; First Lieut., 
George "W. Handley; Second Lieut., George "W. "Whip- 
ple, all of !N"ashua. 



*MoBt of the material &cts of which the history of this regiment is composed have been 
frimlehed by Rev. Stephen Q. Abbott, its worthy Chaplain. In some parts of it his lan- 
guage is used, and in others it is the author's, as the case seemed to require. 



THREE MONTHS' TROOPS. 59 

Co. G, Captain, Andrew J. Sargent, of N'ew London; 
First Lieut., Horace T. H. Pierce, of Keene; Second 
Lieut., Charles H. Drummer, of Keene. 

Co. H, Captain, Jeremiah D. Drew, of Salem ; First 
Lieut., John M. Clark, of Salem ; Second Lieut., Israel 
L. Drew, of Lawrence, Mass. 

Co. I, Captain, Edward E. Sturtevant; First Lieut., 
Henry "W. Fuller; Second Lieut., Enoch "W". Gross, all 
of Concord. 

Co. K, Captain, Grilman E. Sleeper, of Salem ; First 
Lieut., Enoch Q. Fellows, of Sandwich ; Second Lieut., 
HoUis O. Dudley, of Manchester. 

COLONEL MASON W. TAPPAN. 

Colonel Tappan ia a son of the late "Weare Tappan, 
for many years a lawyer at Bradford, and died in 1866. 
Mason was horn at Newport, Sullivan County, October 
20, 1817, and at an early age removed with his family 
to Bradford, in Merrimack County, where he has since 
resided. He fitted for college, studied law with his 
father and Hon. G-eorge "W". Nesmith, of Franklin, now 
one of the judges of the Supreme Judicial Court, and 
was admitted to the Bar in 1841. 

Colonel Tappan acted with the Free Soil, American 
and Republican parties, each in their turn. Although 
the town of Bradford was largely democratic, such was 
his personal popularity with his fellow-townsmen that 
he was elected to the Legislature successively in 1853, 
1854 and 1855, and was one of the most prominent, in- 
dustrious and able members of the House. He was a 
candidate for Speaker of the House in 1854, and not- 
withstanding there was a democratic majority in that 
body of about twenty, came within two votes of an elec- 
tion. The same year he was nominated by the Whigs, 
Free Boilers, Lidependent Democrats and Americans for 



60 THE G-BEAT REBELLION. 

member of Congress from the Second District, and was 
elected in March, 1855. He was twice re-elected, and 
served in the 34th, 35th and 36th Congresses, with 
marked ability, and to the acceptance of his constitu- 
ents. In the 34th and 35th Congresses he served upon 
the Judiciary Committee, and in the 36th was chairman 
of the Committee on .Claims. 

In July, 1856, Col. Tappan made an able speech, the 
House being in Committee of the Whole on the state of 
the Union, upon the subject of the extension of slavery 
into Kansas, which was listened to with marked atten- 
tion. The following is its closing paragraph : 

" In conclusion, Mr. Chairman, let me say that we 
seek no quarrel with our brethren of the South. This 
is an issue which they have forced upon us, and, with 
God's blessings, we will met it as becomes worthy de- 
scendants of patriotic sires ! You sometimes tell us 
that you want to be let alone. . That is precisely what 
we intend to do. We will interfere with none of your 
rights. Whatever is ' nominated in the bond,' that we 
will yield. In turn, is it too much for us to make the 
same request of you — ^that you will let lis alone? If 
Slavery be a blessing, to you shall inure all its benefits. 
If it be a curse, do not ask to place it upon our soil — ^to 
involve us in its guilt. We desire to cultivate the rela^ 
tions of peace and of fraternal kindness with the people 
of the South." 

In March, 1858, Col. Tappan delivered another able 
speech in the House upon Slavery Agitation, Nullificar 
tion, and the Lecompton Constitution, in which he said 
he wished " to put on record the protest of Few Hamp- 
shire- against what I conceive to be the most stupendous 
political'fraud that was ever before attempted to be per- 
petrated upon any people ! " 

In the 36th Congress, in the winter of 1860-61, Col. 
Tappan was placed upon the celebrated select commit- 



THREE MONTHS' TB00P8. 61 

tee of thirty-three — one from each State — to whom was 
referred so much of the President's annual message as 
related to the then disturbed state of the country, and 
joined with C. C. Washburn, of Wisconsin, in a minor- 
ity report. The majority had agreed to and submitted 
a report to the House, recommending amendments to 
the Constitution which would give to the South all and 
more than they had claimed for their peculiar institu- 
tion. The minority report was an able document, and 
concluded with recommending the adoption by the 
House of the following resolution, which was the same 
as had been offered in the Senate by Mr. Clark, of 'S&w 
Hampshire : 

" Resolved, That the provisions of the Constitution are 
ample for the preservation of the Union, and the pro- 
tection of the material interests of the country ; that it 
needs to be obeyed rather than amended ; and our ex- 
trication from present difficulties is to be looked for in 
efforts to preserve and protect the public property and 
enforce the laws, rather than in new guarantees for par- 
ticular interests, or compromises or concessions to un- 
reasonable demands." 

When the minority report was submitted, on the 5th 
of February, 1861, Mr. Tappan made a speech in the 
House, defending in an eloquent and forcible manner 
the position he and his associate, Mr. Washburn, had 
taken. He declared it as his belief that no compromise 
measures could be adopted by Congress which would 
appease the fury of the South or be productive of any 
good. He also declared his faith in the patriotism of 
the mass of the people of the country ^nd in the Consti- 
tution to carry the nation safely through the crisis then 
pending. These positions were justified by subsequent 
events. 

Col. Tappan was appointed by members of the House 
of Kepresentatives on the Vigilance Committee at 



62 THE ORE AT BEBELLION. 

WasMngton, tlie latter part of the winter of 1861, wlien 
the very atmosphere of that locality seemed charged 
with treason, and was most zealous and active in watch- 
ing the movements of rebels resident and temporarily 
there plotting the destruction of the Capital and our 
national existence. 

On the call of President Lincoln for 75,000 volunteers 
for three months. Col. Tappan was one of the first men 
in the State to enlist. When the First Eegiment was 
being organized, he was regarded by almost everybody 
who knew him as the proper person to take command- 
of it, and was accordingly appointed and commissioned 
Colonel by Gov. Goodwin. As a commander he was 
patriotic, brave, thoughtful of and kind to his officers 
and men, and respected by all. He returned to the 
State with his regiment at the expiration of its term of 
enlistment, and was mustered out with it. Afterwards, 
when Col. Whipple resigned the command of the Fourth 
Regiment, it was offered by Gov. Berry to Col. Tappan, 
but he declined it for the reason that it would be unjust 
to Lieut. Col. Bell and other officers of 'the regiment. 
He did not again enter the army. As the subsequent 
regiments were organized the command of them was 
earnestly sought by scores of good and patriotic mr 
while Col. Tappan modestly waited the call of his coi 
try. 

Since the close of the 36th Congress, when his thi 
term in the House of Representatives expired. Col. Ti 
pan has devoted himself assiduously to the practice 
his profession, an^ is regarded as among the first la 
yers in the State, both as counselor and advocate. ] 
has taken an active part in nearly every political cai^- 
vass in the State for the last fifteen years, delivering 
many eloquent and effective speeches upon pending 
issues. 



THREE MONTHS' TROOPS. 63 

As a citizen, a neighbor writes of Mm : " Mr. Tappan's 
kindness to the poor and afflicted; his fidelity as a 
friend ; his sensitiveness of heart, and his honor in his 
profession, are proverbial ,among his most intimate ac- 
quaintances." 

From the 1st to the 4th of May the First Eegiment 
was mustered into the service of the United States. 
The State uniformed and equipped the officers, and sup- 
plied the regiment with tents, camp equipage of almost 
every description, sixteen thorough built four-horse 
baggage wagons, a two-horse ambulance, and excellent 
horses and harnesses for the whole; medical stores, 
surgical instruments, provisions, etc., sufficient to en- 
able the men to support themselves for weeks, if neces- 
sary. 

Thus equipped the regiment embarked on board the 
cars at Concord, on the morning of the 25th of May, 
bound for the seat of war. The train consisted of eigh- 
teen passenger cars and the same number of frieght cars. 
The novelty of the event, together with the anxious and 
tender solicitude of friends, drew together a great crowd 
to witness the departure. The masses which packed 
the area, swaying to and fro at every movement; the 
groups of friends with hearts wildly beating against 
each other as they exchanged parting embraces and 
kisses ; the sobs and cries that bespoke the tender af- 
fection of mothers, sisters, wives and loved ones ; the 
deep sympathy that came welling up from all hearts 
and betraying itself in the anxious and tearful counte- 
nance ; all this in strange contrast with the boisterous 
shouting and laughing of the soldiers — some of which 
might be traced to recklessness, but much more to a 
desperate attempt to maintain their courage and cheer- 
fulness — together with the rousing cheers of the multi- 
tude as a final farewell, were prominent features in the 



64 ' TEE QBE AT REBELLION. 

picture, which will not soon fade from the memory of 
those who witnessed the scene, and especially those who 
were actors in it. 

The progress of the regiment thence onward was one 
continued ovation through all the inhabited portions of 
the route. Every house displayed its flag ; the husband- 
men left their fields to give them words of cheer; in 
villages and thickly settled districts the roadsides were 
lined with the inhabitants — men, women and children, 
vieing with each other in their sentiments of honor and 
words and deeds of encouragement. At Worcester, 
Mass., the citizens provided a magnificent entertain- 
ment in Mechanics' Hall, spread upon tables sufficient 
to accommodate the entire regiment. This favor was 
most opportune and was gratefully remembered by the 
soldiers during their campaign. Leaving "Worcester 
the regiment proceeded by the Sound route to IsTew 
York, arriving there on Sunday morning, May 26th, 
and enjoyed the hospitalities of the city. The soldiers 
were entertained at the Arsenal, and a sumptuous din- 
ner was provided for the officers at the Astor House. 

The Sons of New Hampshire in New York, number- 
ing four hundred and fifty, met at the Brandreth House, 
at half-past seven o'clock in the morning, and organized 
by choosing Charles L. Frost, chairman, and John P. 
March, Secretary, and marched to the steamboat wharf 
to meet the regiment. On this occasion and before the 
arrival of the boat, impromtu speeches were made by 
Dr. W. M. Chamberlain, H. B. Perkins and Judge Pea- 
body. It was also resolved that they should form an 
association for the relief of New Hampshire soldiers, 
and that the families of the troops should be cared for 
in the absence of their protectors, all present pledging 
themselves to carry out the project to the fullest extent. 
A committee, styled a Committee of Aid and Corre- 
spondence, was appointed, and consisted of the follow- 



THREE MONIES' TROOPS. 

ing gentlemen : Eobert Colby, ISTew London ; "W". M. 
Chamberlain, Hanover; John P. March, Rochester; 
Charles E. Soule, Exeter; Levi P. Morton, Bristol; 
George E. Mendnm, Portsmouth; L. L. Britten, Or- 
ford ; George H. Moore, Concord ; John L. Hanson, 
Dover. The steamers arrived between nine and ten 
o'clock, and while the men were disembarking, Fred 
A. Briggs, of Claremont, then clerk at the LaFarge 
House, was raised upon some cotton bales and ordered 
to lead the singing of " America " and " Old Hundred," 
which he did with spirit, while the whole Association 
sung most enthusiastically. They sung and cheered un- 
til they were hoarse, and as Col. Tappan passed by them 
at the head of his troops the excitement was intense. 
A procession was formed under the marshalship of Sid- 
ney "Webster, and the entire body marched to the Bran- 
dreth House, where a beautifal silk flag was presented 
to the regiment by Judge Bonney, in the following 
speech : 

"Fellow Citizens and Soldieks op 'Ewnf Hamp- 
shire : — ^We, natives of the Granite State, desire to 
welcome you to the metropolis. It is not our place to 
inquire why you are here. "We all know that in time 
of old, when the liberty of the country, and the people 
was in danger, I^ew Hampshire sent a large number of 
men to the support of the government. We know that 
when the Constitution was subsequently in danger, and 
when it was sought to be violated in the halls of the 
Legislature, !N"ew Hampshire sentforth expounders ablest 
of them all. And now, when the cry has gone forth that 
the country is in danger and the Constitution unsafe, - 
K'ew Hampshire comes to the rescue as of old, and says 
the Union and the Constitution shall be maintained. 
(Cheers). Soldiers, you are going to fight a great fight 
— ^fight in a great cause, and for great principles. It is 
to be determined now whether man is capable of self- 



66 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

government, and whetlier we have a government at all. 
"We know that when you meet danger you vsdll meet it 
as your forefathers did — without fear. We of the Gran- 
ite State desire to present you with this banner, to be 
borne in the struggle. It bears no strange or unusual 
device. It is the old Stars and Stripes, the device of 
our fathers, grown broader and broader every year as a 
new star has been added to the glorious constellation. 
It is that untarnished flag which has never suifered dis- 
honor or humiliation, and which was only lowered at 
Sumter by the odds of seven thousand men against 
seventy. To your hands we intrust the banner, feeling 
secure that it will be nobly borne, and that the words 
of General Dix : ' If any man attempts to haul down 
that flag, shoot him on the spot,' will ever accompany 
it. This is not the time for talking. "We will present 
you with the flag, and bid you ' Onward — God speed.' 
Those whom you have left behind you, and those you 
see around you, will come to your aid if you ever 
should call for assistance, and to this end we all pledge 
ourselves." 

Colonel Tappan replied in a neat and appropriate 
speech, substantially as follows : 

" Sons of ISTew Hampshire in ITew York, I have not 
words to thank you for the kind manner in which you 
have greeted us. It is but natural for us, who have re- 
cently left our homes and bid adieu to all the ties which 
bind us there, to receive gratefully the kind attentions 
which have been manifested during our travels. In 
feet, our progress all along the route has been a con- 
tinued ovation. These manifestations of a free people 
show how plainly is the determination to maintain the 
Union in all its integrity. But none of these manifes- 
tations are more grateful than the one to-day. I will 
take this beautiful flag, and promise that you will never 



THREE MONTHS' TBOOPls. 67 

have occasion toi regret that you gave it to us — that it 
never will be tarnished by this regiment, but that every 
m&n will rally to its protection. We know that this 
may be no holiday affair ; but we have counted the cost. 
It is, as you say, no time to inquire what we are here 
for. It is to be determined whether one State, or seven 
States, can secede and break up the most glorious gov- 
ernment ever devised by man. (Loud cheers.) That 
flag shall never be dishonored, I can assure you, gentle- 
men." 

. The flag was paid for by subscription from the friends 
of !N^ew Hampshire men in New York City. The 
amount of subscription was put at three dollars, and no 
greater sum was received from any one person. 

A New York paper, in giving an account of the pas- 
sage of this regiment through that city, said : " Accom- 
panying the troops were one hundred and sixteen 
horses, sixteen baggage wagons, containing tents and 
provisions for thirty days, and one hospital wagon. 
There were also in attendance sixteen nurses, who took 
dinner at the Astor House. The troops were dressed 
in a gray uniform, and armed with Springfield muskets 
of 1847 pattern. In point of equipage no body of sol- 
diers was ever better provided for ; and as for fighting 
material, they even excelled the Sixty-Ninth (Irish) 
regiment of this State." 

The burial of Col. Ellsworth, of the New York Fire 
Zouaves, who was shot at the Marshall House, Alexan- 
dria, Va., on the 24th, when taking down a rebel flag, 
occurred on this day, and the funeral procession was so 
extended as to baflle repeated attempts to pass through 
the city to Jersey ferry, and the regiment was obliged 
to stand on the street until its entire length had passed. 

The regiment proceeded to Baltimore by railroad, ar- 
riving there about four o'clock in the afternoon of 
Monday, the 27th of Mav. This was the great point of 



68 THE QBE AT REBELLION. 

interest to all as the scene of the first blood shed in the 
rehellion. The men disembarked from the cars and 
were kept waiting nearly two hours for the baggage 
train. Perfect order and quiet prevailed, though the 
streets were thronged with citizens. Many words of 
cheer were quietly spoken; water and refreshments 
were distributed ; one large flag was stretched across 
the street and many small ones were flying from the, 
windows, and occasionally a lady was seen waving her 
handkerchief. "With these exceptions the calm was evi- 
dently that of a spirit under the restraint of fear. The 
Manchester Cornet Band, which was attached to the 
regiment, played the first national air in that city after 
the murderous assault upon the Massachussetts Sixth. 
It was " Yankee Doodle," and they played it with a 
will, the men of the regiment seeming to enjoy it all 
the more for the evident annoyance it occasioned to a 
large portion of the bystanders. At a late hour the 
regiment marched through the city to the Camden Sta- 
tion and took the cars for Washington. A crowd was 
collected at the depot, and a few faint cheers rose 
above the noise and confusion of the departure. 

The regiment arrived at Washington at half-past one 
o'clock on Tuesday morning, May 28. Early in the 
morning the regiment marched up. Pennsylvania 
Avenue, passing the President's house, and on to Kal- 
orama, about two miles out of the city, and went into 
camp. Immediately a special messenger arrived from 
the President, complimenting Col. Tappan as having 
the best appointed regiment that had thus far come in- 
to Washington. During the day numerous philan- 
thropic ladies and gentlemen and sanitary committees 
visited the camp and inquired after the wants of the 
men, proffering services for their relief, and seemed 
almost incredulous when told they needed nothing. It 
was a novelty for a regiment to appear at Washington 



THREE MONTMS' TROOPS. 69 

prepared to take care of themselves, so hastily had the 
troops left their homes to rush to the defense of the na- 
tion capital 

When in camp the religious services consisted uni- 
formly of singing by the regiment and reading of the 
scriptures and prayer by the Chaplain, immediately 
after the dress parade. On Sunday there was added a 
short address by the Chaplain. While at Kalorama, 
very many spectators of all classes, from Washington, 
congregated to witness these ceremonies, and among 
them were often seen President Lincoln and family. 
Just before the religious services on the 1st of June, 
firing was heard in the direction of Alexandria, and an 
unofficial messenger communicated the intelligence that 
X an engagement was in progress, and the First ITew 
Hampshire Regiment was to be called out, which cre- 
ated no little excitement among the men, not one of 
whom had ever been utider fire, and the worthy Chap- 
lain had caught something of the infection. A discon- 
nected portion of his prayer on that occasion has often 
been published in such a way as to do that gentleman 
great injustice. It was to the effect " That if God could 
make it consistent with his purposes concerning us as a 
people and a nation, blood-shed and violence might be 
averted ; but if otherwise, his purpose, justice, liberty 
and peace demanded the sacrifice, that He would give to 
our soldiers a brave heart, a firm nerve, a steady eye, 
and send the missile straight to its mark." The alarm 
proved to be a false one and the excitement soon sub- 
sided. 

At seven o'clock on Monday morning, the 10th of 
June, the regiment broke camp and joined a brigade 
commanded by Col. Charles P. Stone, and marched to 
Eockville, nineteen miles. The day was very warm, and 
some of the men, overcome by the heat, fell out by the 
way, but were helped forward in the wagons and by offi- 



70 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

cers who dismounted and placed them upon their horses, 
Col. Tappan and the others often giving up their horses 
to weary and over-heated privates. The regiment went 
into camp upon the Montgomery County Fair Grounds, 
a beautiful spot, and named it Camp Lincoln. Here 
they made the acquaintance of the New York Ninth, in 
this wise : "While on the march from Kalorama the 
Ninth was behind the New Hampshire First. When 
they halted at noon for rest and refreshment, the Ninth 
marched first and passed our regiment, at which our 
boys were a little piqued, considering it a breach of 
etiquette. They occupied the north slope of the Fair 
Ground and our regiinent the south. At the dress 
parade the next day the Ninth came out first and were 
looked upon in mute curiosity. The First followed and 
did their best, while the Ninth watched them with as- 
tonishment at their proficiency in drill, and expressed 
approbation by frequent cheers. After the parade was 
over the First returned to the parade ground and began 
vociferously to cheer the Ninth, which compliment was 
enthusiastically returned, and for ten minutes the two 
were pitted against each other in the exercise of the 
vocal organs upon the highest possible pitch, when sud- 
denly the Ninth vaulted the fence which separated them 
and rushed to the area; the First accepted the challenge, 
and instantly not less than fifteen hundred soldiers were 
shaking hands, embracing each other, shaking the earth 
with their cheers and stamping and literally filling the 
air with their caps. Such a scene of sinking all preju- 
dice in the cordial greetings of kindred spirits it is not 
the privilege of men often to witness. The most inti- 
mate friendship ever after prevailed between them, at- 
tracting the notice of the entire brigade. 

The people of Eockville were struck with the utmost 
consternation at the appearance of our troops, supposing 
that " beauty and booty " was their sole errand. This 



THREE MONTHS' TROOPS. 71 

impression was soon dissipated, however, by the kind 
and orderly behavior of the men. ' The men were gen- 
erally very well behaved and respected the property of 
the inhabitants, while there were a few who were much 
inclined to find something good to eat, without so much 
regard to the superior claims of the owners. A stutter- 
ing soldier entered a house and asked the good lady to 
sell him some pie, who replied, " "We don't sell pies to 
your kind of soldiers." He coolly drew his pistol, laid 
it on the table, sat down beside it and began, Yankee 
fashion, to ask many indifferent questions. Finally he 
inquired, " Ho-ow-ow long do-does it t-t-take to bu-bu- 
,build a^a house d-d-down here?" ""Wall 'bout three 
months, I reckon, if we work right smart.'' " D-d-does 
it? (looking around the room), it wo-wo-wont t-take 
three ho-hours t-t-to p-p-puU it d-d-down." His 6rear 
ture wants were soon supplied, and after offering to pay 
he bowed himself out with a grateful "t-t-thank you 
ma-a-am." 

But one Union flag was displayed in the place — show- 
ing that secession was the prevailing sentiment — and 
this was in the yard of Eev. L. S. Russell, rector of the 
Episcopal church, and a son of Major Russell, of Boston, 
of Revolutionary note. There were a few other IJnion 
families there, and many that professed Union for the 
occasion. Court was in session, and one of the soldiers 
took a small flag, went into the second story of the 
court house, and reaching out of a window, stuck the 
staff into a joint of the bricks, where it remained until 
the regiment left. It was the occasion of much angry 
talk and many threats, but no one dared to touch it. 

On the 14th of June the regiment started on the 
march to Poolsville. It was reported from "Washington 
that Harper's Ferry was evacuated by the rebels, and 
that they were liable to come down upon the small 



72 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

bodies of troops stationed as gxaards along the river. 
The march was apparently a perilous one, but the ut- 
most cheerfulness was manifested by the men. The 
regiment bivouacked for the night at Darnestown, nine 
miles from Rockville, and arrived at Poolsville, nine 
miles further, about noon of the 15th. The real object 
of this movement proved to be to guard the river against 
the rebels who might contemplate crossing. There be- 
ing a large force of rebels at Leesburg, Va., five miles 
inland from Conrad Ferry, fears were entertained that 
they would attempt to cross at that point. On the 
morning of the 17th, Companies A, C, E, G and I were 
sent there under command of Lieut. Col. Whipple. 
When within about a mile of the Ferry the rebels 
opened fire upon them with rifles, and soon after with 
six lb. cannon, while the detachment of the First Regi- 
ment had nothing but Springfield muskets. ^ They con- 
tinued the fire at intervals for an hour. In the afternoon 
the enemy opened fire again with rifies and cannon, and 
thus continued from time to time through that day and 
the day following. On the evening of the 17th Col. 
Stone ordered Capt. Grardner, of the Pennsylvania Rifle- 
men, with twenty of his company, to the Ferry, who 
joined in the fight, firing simultaneously with the boys 
of the First Regiment into the smoke of the enemy, the 
only indication of their exact position. Here the firing 
on both sides ceased. The rebels acknowledged the 
loss of one captain and two' privates killed and about 
twelve wounded. None of our men were hurt, though 
several very narrowly escaped. 

As soon as it was ascertained that the firing was in 
the direction of the Ferry, Col. Tappan started with the 
other five companies of the regiment for the scene of 
action, soon after which he met a messenger who noti- 
fied him of the engagement. He was soon, however, 
overtaken by an order from Col. Stone, to return and 



THREE MONTHS' TROOPS. 73 

guard the camp from an anticipated attack from another 
direction. There was some difference of opinion as to 
the propriety of sending so many men to the Ferry, 
which was Col. Stone's plan, Col. Tappan being of opin- 
ion that a simple picket would be less likely to invite 
an attack, which was not the object in view. 

An incident occurred here worthy to be recorded to 
the memory of the actress. Mrs. Dr. Brace was sitting 
by the Chaplain's tent door when the firing was first 
heard. She mounted her horse and rode home, and 
immediately wrote the following note to the Captain of 
a company of infantry belonging to Poolsville. The 
Captain was Union, but most of his men were secesh : 

" Capt. Pletcheb :-7-Do you fight under the Stars and 
Stripes ? K so, up and he doing ! Yirginia is firing upon 
Maryland! Shall we stand idly by and let Northern men 
protect our homes and firesides ? " 

A Miss Susan Dawson, nineteen years of age, of Daw- 
sonville, Va., whose widowed mother's house was ever 
a soldier's home, was one day on a visit to her uncle's, 
at Poolsville. The uncle being absent a secesh came 
to the door and demanded a stand of arms that the 
uncle was known to have in his possession. Her aunt 
being a timid woman, Susan went to the door and re- 
fused to give them up. He first attempted to intimi- 
date her by insolence and threats, but finding her proof 
against this kind of tactics, he asked to see the arms, 
when she replied : — " The arms belong to the State of 
Maryland, and in due time will be returned to the State 
authorities. Tou can neither have them nor see them, 
and the sooner you are off the better." He left without 
further parley. 

These are perhaps fair samples of the spirit of the 
true Union women met with in Maryland during the 



74 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

first few months of the rebellion. Their boldness and 
decision might well have been emulated by many pro- 
fessed Union men at the N'orth during those days, when 
doubt and indecision gave to the rebels courage and 
hope. 

The following correspondence, showing the state of 
feeling in Maryland at that time, is worth a place here : 

" Daenestown, June 19, 1861. 
"Rev. Me. Abbott, — ^Dear Sir: — I learned through 
my friend, B. S. Hayes, that you had passed through 
Darnestown en route for the D. C, and would return to- 
day, and concluded I would write you concerning some 
information I received on my return from Poolsville on 
the same day you arrived at that place. Mr. N. Almutt, 
who owns the farm located on each side of Seneca 

Creek, which you crossed en route to P sville, and 

one of our strongest Union men, who has been voting 
with the democratic party and owning slaves, and is 
one who I know would not misrepresent the conduct 
of any one. I stopped at his house on my return, and 
he was somewhat desponding. 1 inquired the cause, 
and his reply was : He had enough to discourage the 
hope of non-interference on the part of the troops with 
our slaves. 

" As your regiment was passing by his farm, his farm 
hands were plowing corn in a field bordering on the 
road, and as the men moved up the road he fol- 
lowed along with the regiment as far as his house, and 
saw several of your men beckon to his servants in the 
field and ask them if they did not want to be free, &c. 
Wow, my dear sir, this is oM wrong, and ought to be 
stopped. 

" God knows I speak from the best motives and with 
a view to strengthen the Union feeling. Break down 



TEHEE MONTHS' TMOOPS. 75 

the idea of interference, and ultimately save our country, 
and render your lives more comfortable and pleasant 
while absent from your families. 

" I hope you will call the Colonel's attention to this 
fact, and oblige 

" Your respectful friend and well-wisner, 
" John L. Dufibf, 

" Darnestown, Md. 

" N". B. May God in his mercy avert this horrible 
war, and all learn to respect the laws and the Constitu- 
tion, and continue as a nation unto the end of time, a 
happy, prosperous and united people. Hoping you and 
your friends may return to your families safely, 

" Remain yours, &c., 

" J. L. D. 
"Kconvenient should be please to hear from you. D." 

" PooLSViLLB, Md., June 21, 1861. 

" JoHK L. DxiPiBP, Esq. — My dear sir : — ^Tour favor of 
the 19th inst., was duly received and read with great 
interest. I admire the frankness with which you speak, 
and confide in the spirit and motive by which you are 
actuated ; and I assure you that in my reply, the same 
frankness, spirit and motive shall be sacredly regarded. 

" It seems that your friend's despondency is predi- 
cated solely on the fact that he ' saw several of our men 
beckon to his servants in the field and ask them if they 
did not want to be jree,' &c. ' This,' you say, ' is all 
wrong and ought to be stopped.' I fully believe his 
statement and agree with you in your conclusion; and 
I assure you that should any of our men be detected in 
tampering with the slaves for the purpose of aiding 
them to escape, they would meet with severe and mer- 
ited punishment. We came here for no such purpose, 
and no such conduct is, or will be tolerated under any 



76 TEE GREAT BEBELLION. 

ordinary circumstances. Whetlier or not, in a seceding 
state, slaves — as property — would be considered, contra- 
band of war and subject to confiscation, is a question 
upon wMcb I have consulted no one, and can give no 
opinion. One tbing is certain, whatever may be the 
sentiment of a part of our regiment, with regard to the 
moral right of slavery, we have come here with the in- 
tention of recognizing the/ac< of property in slaves and 
of respecting the rights of citizens who hold such prop- 
erty. iN'ow, my dear sir, with this possible exception you 
and your friends from the District of Columbia to the 
Gulf of Mexico may rest in the utmost security. Not a 
slave will be permitted to go one mile or rod with us, 
from his master, with our knowledge. 

" Now to be a little more definite with regard to the 
case you mention, let me say, first, that we have nearly 
a thousand men with us, the first enlistment of volun- 
teers ; and can any rational man expect or even demand 
that there should be no rogues among them who would 
do such a thing merely for mischief? I do not krww of 
one and yet there may be, and if so, should that discour- 
age Union men here ? or should the whole regiment be 
held responsible for it, and their motive be impugned 
for it ? 

"Again. If you and your friend were as well ac- 
quainted with Yankee character as I am, you would be 
more amused than alarmed at such questioning. "We 
are constitutionally and hereditarily addicted to asking 
questions, and the propensity to gratify curiosity is as 
irresistible as the current of a mighty river. Hence the 
same question has always been asked by northerners, 
both pro-slavery and anti-slavery, in traveling south. It 
is simply a wish to know for themselves what they learn 
by testimony. I feel the same curiosity myself, though 
I have wholly restrained it, on account of the extreme 
sensitiveness of the people just at this time. I very 



THREE MONTHS' TROOPS. 77 

seriously doubt whether a man in our company had any 
other motive in the questions they asked. 

" I thought when I left home, and every day's march 
and every day's residence here confirm the opinion, that 
a more intimate social acquaintance of the people North 
and South will do morS than all the bayonets in the 
country to harmonize feeling and effect a desirable and 
permanent peace as it respects the masses. When they 
are right, all is right. God knows that such a peace is 
the one great desire of the masses of the ITorth, and. I 
doubt not the same is true of the South also. 

" Our arms are not taken up for the purpose of ' inva- 
sion,' or for ' blotting out the South,' but simply to 
stand by and defend the government and the glorious 
old flag, which have been assailed. Let us now, my 
dear sir, believe each other, trust each other, be charit- 
able towards each other and stand shoulder to shoulder 
in the cause upon the .success of which depend our se- 
curity, _our prosperity and the value of all our prized 
institutions. Let us devoutly pray to the God of na- 
tions that right and justice may prevail and peace be 
speedily restored. 

" I designed to say in another connection that slaves 
are daily sent into camp on business whose masters 
have repeatedly expressed the utmost confidence in our 
men. And slaves are all the time at work in a field ad- 
joining our camp, and no fears are expressed, because, 
I firmly believe, no occasion for fear is given. 

" Let me say in conclusion, that I cannot hold myself 
bound to reply to letters upon this subject, because we do 
not propose any such interference as is suggested ; but 
knowing the kjnd spirit in which you write I am very 
happy to respond, and shall be happy to acknowledge any 
further correspondence with you. I have written this in 
great haste, that it may go by a messenger about leav- 



78 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

ing, and you are at liberty to make such honorable use 
of it as you please. 

" Respectfully your friend and brother, 
" S. G-. Abbott, 
« Chap. 1st S". H. Vol. M." 

The regiment remained at Poolsville twenty-one days, 
and guarded about fifteen miles of the river, night and 
day, besides doing much guard and' picket duty in other 
directions. For days at a time they had not less than 
twenty miles of sentinels, so near to each other that the 
discharge of a musket would in a few minutes alarm 
every man in the regiment. 

As has been remarked, the men of this regiment gen- 
erally respected the rights and property of the inhabit- 
ants in the vicinity of their camp, though there were 
occasional complaints made to the Colonel of their 
depredations. One morning a citizen entered a com- 
plaint, and the Colonel soon after met a squad of the 
boys who he suspected might have been concerned in 
the appropriation of certain fowls which were missing, 
and told them with apparent seriousness that they had 
got themselves into trouble. " Why," said one of them, 
" what is the trouble ? " " Mr. A. says he has lost eleven 
geese." "Eleven geese! did he say any thing about 
his pigs ? " This was a little too much for the Colonel's 
gravity, and he passed on with a snuff and a laugh that 
any one would appreciate who has seen him, and nobody 
else can. 

One day the Staff found upon the dinner-table a roast 
pig, of which they all ate freely, asking no questions. 
Soon after all were sick except the Chaplain, whose 
escape the others jocosely attributed to the fact that he 
had become used to such food ; whereupon he retorted 
that it was not so, but because he was not aware that 
the pig was stolen, while they were. 



THREE MONTHS' TROOPS. 79 

The regiment acquired and retained the reputation 
througli its division of the army for great fearlessness 
and daring, and passed everywhere by the sobriquet 
of " The !N"ew Hampshire Wild Cats." It was no un- 
common thing for them to meet rebel pickets midway 
of the river by swimming or fording, drink each other's 
health, mutually curse the war, and return to duty. 
H. M. Prescott, of Bristol, swam across the river, un- 
mooreid a boat, and pushed it before him till he thought 
it safe to get in. He was hardly seated before a rebel 
ball passed between his arm and side, glanced upon the 
side of the boat, spent itself in the stern, and rolled 
back to his feet, whereupon he jumped into the water 
and pushed the boat across. Such incidents were not 
infrequent during this encampment. 

On the 3d of July that portion of the regiment which 
was stationed at Conrad Ferry, broke camp and marched 
eight miles to the mouth of the Monocacy, a branch of 
the Potomac, where they spent the Fourth. That part 
of the regiment which was stationed at Edward's Ferry, 
five miles below Conrad, arrived at Monocacy on the 
morning of the 5th, just in season to join the advance 
before marching to Point of Rocks, a dirty little secesh 
village, six miles from Monocacy. The day before their 
arrival the proprietor of the St. Charles Hotel had re- 
fused Col. Stone entertainment, whereupon he marched 
up a company of men, took military possession and 
run the hotel on his own account. Here the men saw 
the cars for the first time since leaving Washington. 

On the 6th of July a detachment, under command of 
Col. Tappan, moved by cars to Sandy Hook, twelve 
miles, opposite Harper's Ferry, and in the mght orders 
were received to send all the baggage that could be 
spared to Frederick, leave* the tents behind in charge 
of a guard, and prepare for rapid movements. At noon 



80 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

on the 7th the reserve was sent up by cars to Sandy 
Hook. It was Col. Stone's design to cross the river 
and take possession of Harper's Ferry, believing that 
the best base of operations for that department. Be-^ 
fore the movement was made, however, a messenger 
was sent down the river from Gen. Patterson with 
orders to advance to "Williamsport and join him in the 
pursuit of Johnston. 

At 7 o'clock, P. M., they marched again, keeping the 
Maryland side of the river, and arrived at Sharpsburg, 
twelve miles, at two o'clock on the morning of the 7th, 
and at "Williamsport, twelve miles further, in the after- 
noon, immediately forded the river," and trod for the 
first time the sacred soil of Virginia. Here they again 
joined the New York Ninth and other regiments of the 
brigade. 

At four o'clock on the morning of the 8th of July the 
entire command of Col. Stone marched for Martinsburg, 
twelve miles, arriving there at noon, and joined the 
command of Gen. Patterson, between Williamsport 
and Martinsburg. Patterson had his running fight 
with Johnston, called the battle of Falling Waters, from 
a small but very rapid brook of pure cold water. The 
prostrate fences, torn and prostrate trees, riddled and 
demolished houses and fresh graves by the road side, 
indicated the field of action. A rebel ball crashed 
into the corner of the roof of a house, and through 
the aperture was run up the Union flag. 

About sixteen thousand troops were concentrated here, 
and it was the design to march the following day in pur- 
suit of Johnston, but it was subsequently determined 
to postpone the march until farther orders, though 
it was then regarded of great importance to prevent 
him from marching from "Winchester to re-enforce the 
army at Manassas. Gen. Patterson's action in this 
matter was a mystery, and after a thorough investiga- 



THREE MONTHS' TROOPS. 81 

tion of the circumstances he was superseded by Gen. 
N". P. Banks, of Massachusetts. 

The clothes of the men had become very much worn 
and they were almost shoeless. "What new pants they 
had were distributed, but not a pair of shoes could be 
obtained. JS'ecessity is the mother of invention. Lieut. 
George "W". Colbath, of Dover, was detailed to head the 
force; leather, thread, awls and hammers were ob- 
tained ; pegs were made with knives, and soon several 
shoemaker's shops were extemporized and in full opera- 
tion in the grove where the regiment was encamped; 
the old shoes were mended, and the men's feet thus 
made comfortable for the time. 

The boys were obliged to make all sorts of shifts to 
cover their nakedness. Three of them got a sutler's 
sign, painted upon cotton cloth — " Pies and Cakes," 
divided it into three parts, and patched the seats of 
their pantaloons with it. Their positions were together 
in the line, and when on parade it read from right to 
left of the company, " Pies and Cakes," to the no sma;ll 
amusement of the regiment. 

Another man patched the seat of his pantaloons with 
the discarded covering of a ham, plainly marked in cir- 
cular form, " Sugar-Cured Hams, for Family Use." 

An institution of the regiment, and indeed of the 
army, was the fife-major, Francis H. Pike, of Man- 
chester. Any attempt to describe his personal appear- 
ance would be futile. He could only be appreciated 
after having been seen, in full uniform, baton in hand, 
at the head of the regiment. Those who never saw 
him thus have yet to see a fife-major. -He had left his 
gaudy uniform at Point of Eocks and had on only a 
fatigue cap and blouse. Walking up to the hotel door, 
where a guard was stationed with strict orders to let 
none pass in but commissioned officers, he was sud- 



82 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

denly brought to a halt. Drawing himself up to his 
full height and looking down upon the sentinel with 
the utmost indignation, he calmly, but with great 
authority asked — "Do you know who I am, sir?" 
The sentinel felt the majesty of his speech and meekly 
inquired, " Are you an officer?" "What do I look 
like, sir?" replied the indignant fife-major. "Pass," 
was the laconic answer. 

On Monday, July 15, at five o'clock in the morning, 
the regiment with the rest of the division under Gen, 
Patterson — consisting of twenty-seven regiments and 
six hundred wagons — were on the march, and all hearts 
were fired with enthusiasm when they found themselves 
on the road to "Winchester. The rebels were scattered 
along the road in small companies, but fled on the ap- 
proach of the Union army. A few cannon shots were 
occasionally exchanged, but no one was injured. They 
arrived at Bunker Hill, ten miles from Martinsburg, 
about two o'clock, P. M., and encamped on ground just 
vacated by the rebels, a small force of whom retreated 
from Bunker Hill with the utmost haste. They were 
now within fiftefen miles of "Winchester, and were 
elated with the expectation of being led next morning- 
to that place, either to engage the enemy or to inter- 
cept and prevent him from re-enforcing the army at 
Manassas. 

The day was passed in a feeble reconnoisance in the 
direction of "Winchester, with no results. The next 
morning, the 17th, at day light, instead of advancing 
on "Winchester, a retreat to Charlestown, twelve miles, 
was commenced. It now became quite evident that 
there was no design on the part of Gen. Patterson to 
meet the enemy. The army marched into the village 
of Charlestown about noon, taking the people by sur- 
prise. The men were discouraged and demoralized. 



THREE MONTHS' TROOPS. 83 

They had several times expected to meet the rehels, 
and had as often been disappointed, which they charged 
upon Gen. Patterson. 

Charlestown was a place of more than ordinary inter- 
est to the troops as the scene of John Brown's imprison- 
ment, trial and execution. The court house, jail and 
the site of the gallows, were visited by thousands, and 
anything that could be gathered in the form of relics, 
was carried away. 

On the night of the 18th, Capt. Kelley's company, 
while on picket, captured a horse and carriage with ^two 
men. They also arrested two niegroes at different times, 
who proved to belong to the same master, and both 
told the same story, as follows : Their master was in 
the rebel army; their overseer, who lived two miles 
out of the village, was captain of a company of local 
militia. On the approach of our army he disbanded 
the company; secreted their arms under the eaves of 
the Court House ; hid his uniform, and went home. A 
report was made in the morning at head-quarters and a 
search was ordered. Lieut. ITettleton, of Co. T>, being 
that day Lieutenant of the guard, commenced the search 
in the attic, but found nothing, when he was informed 
by a citizen that he helped bury the arms in the cellar 
of the Court House, whereupon Lieut. Nettleton set a 
squad of the Massachusetts Twelfth to digging, Capt. 
Barton being present and assisting. Forty-three stand 
of arms were found, which were carried away by the 
Massachusetts Twelfth, who claimed the credit of the 
discovery. All the County records, stationery, &c., 
were found here, evidently buried in great haste. Lieut. 
Nettleton, with a squad of men, surrounded a house and 
arrested a rebel Lieutenant and his accomplices, secur- 
ing their arms. 

On the night of the 20th the regiment received the 
first information of fighting at Manassas, and in the 



84 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

night received orders to cook one day's rations. On 
the morning of the 2l8t, the day of the battle of Bull 
Run, the division marched to Harper's Ferry, six miles, 
and encamped on Bolivar Hights. Before marching 
from Charlestown, Col. Stone gave orders to his com- 
mand that any man stealing from the citizens should 
have his head shaved and be drummed out of the camp, 
as the least punishment. Said he, " I never was in or 
saw an army that conducted as this did at Bunker Hill, 
the Ifew Hampshire First excepted." 

Gen. N". P. Banks was appointed to supersede Gen. 
Patterson, and arrived on the night of the 24th and as- 
sumed the command, much to the gratification of ofii- 
cers and men, all of whom had looked upon the latter 
with distrust for some weeks. The change of cam- 
manders inspired the men with new spirit and confi- 
dence in the ultimatie success of the cause for which 
they had been called from the peaceful walks of life. 

On the 28th the First Regiment moved three miles to 
Sandy Hook, where they went into camp and remained 
until the 2d of August, when, their term of enlistment 
having expired, they embarked on board the cars for 
N'ew Hampshire. They were paid, mustered out of 
service and discharged at Concord on the 12th of 
August, 1861. 

The casualties in the regiment were as follows : 

Discharged before leaving the State, 3 

Discharged by reason of disability, 13 

Discharged by court-marshal, 2 

Deaths from different causes, 4 

Captured by the enemy, 5 

Transferred to 2d N, H. Regiment, 1 

Deserted, 7 

Total, 35 



THREE MONTHS' TB0018. 85 

Although the First New Hamsphire Regiment did 
not have the privilege of inscribing any pitched battles 
upon their banner — which was no fault of their's — ^they 
yet rendered very arduous and important service to 
the country, at a time when to hesitate was to be lost, 
and never shirked any duty which they were called to 
perform, or which the imperiled country required at 
their hands. Many, if not most, of the men of this sub- 
sequently re-enlisted and served in other IsTew Hamp- 
shire regiments with honor and distinction. Lieut. 
Col. Whipple was made Colonel of the Fourth; Major 
Stevens was Colonel of the Thirteenth; Adjutant Fel- 
lows was Colonel of the Third, and also of the Ninth ; 
Capt. Bell was Colonel of the Fourth on the resignation 
of Col. Whipple; Capt. Barton was Lieut. Colonel of 
the Heavy Artillery ; Quartermaster Batchelder served 
in the Army of the Potomac as Brigade and Division 
Quartermaster, with honor to the State; Surgeon 
Crosby — ^who unlike many surgeons in the army then 
and subsequently, knew and kindly, carefully and faith- 
fully administered to the needs of the men, and will 
ever be remembered with great respect — rendered most 
valuable service in the Army of the Potomac. Chap- 
lain Abbott, than whom no regiment ever had a more 
patriotic, faithful and industrious one, returned to his 
high calling and has labored consistently for the salva- 
tion of the souls of men. He compiled a small book, 
containing thirty or forty hymns, for the use of his regi- 
ment, which was the first one of its kind in the army. 
Capt. Sturtevant was Major of the Fifth Eegiment and 
was killed at the battle of Fredericksburg ; Capt. Drew 
was Lieut. Colonel of the Fourth ; Lieut. Sawyer was 
Major of the Fourth; Lieut. Fuller was Adjutant of 
the Fourth ; Capt. Kelley was afterwards Brigade Quar- 
termaster ; Captains Greenleaf and Sleeper, and Lieuts. 
Clough and Wallace were Captains in the Fourth; 



86 TEE GREAT BEBELLION. 

Lieut. Israel L. Drew was First Lieut, in the Fourth, 
and died at Annapolis; Fife-Major Pike was Principal 
Musician in the Fourth. Other commissioned and non- 
commissioned officers and privates served in different 
organizations, with the ever varying fortunes of war. 

New Hampshire has many reasons for pride in its 
First Eegiment and the officers and men who com- 
posed it. 



ACTION OF TEE STATE. 87 



ACTION OF THE STATE. 



The annual session of the Legislature commenced at 
Concord on the 5tli of June, 1861. On the 6th Gov- 
ernor Goodwin delivered a valedictory address, which 
contained the following paragraphs : 

" Since the last session of the General Court a revolu- 
tion against the progress of civilization and the liberties 
of the people has been attempted in our country. This 
revolution has been for years in preparation, and derives 
its principal strength from the efforts and influence of 
men holding place under the General Government, who 
have conspired to overthrow that Constitution which it 
was their solemn and imperative duty to uphold. This 
gigantic conspiracy against liberty and law developed 
during the past winter a formidable organization for 
the destruction of the best government which good 
men ever formed; against which bad men ever con- 
spired ; and that our government, controlled as it has 
been to a great extent by its enemies, has not been en- 
tirely overthrown, is to be attributed to the self-adjusting 
power of free institutions, and the virtues and energies 
of a free people. 

" While it was yet uncertain how far this rebellion 
would extend, and with an earnest desire that nothing 
which honorable men could either ask or grant should 
be left untried, to preserve a Union consecrated by so 
many hallowed memories, and hitherto attended by 
such unexampled prosperity, I, in compliance with the 
unanimous recommendation of our delegation in Con- 



88 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

gress, and in accordance with my own views of duty, 
requested the Hon. Amos Tuck, the Hon. Levi Cham- 
berlain, and the Hon, Asa Fowler to attend as Commis- 
sioners for this State, the Convention which assembled 
at "Washington on the 4th of February last, upon the 
recommendation of the State of Virginia. 

" On the 15th of April last I received by telegraph, 
through the War Department, a requisition from the 
President of the United States, calling for one regiment 
from this State for three months' service, to be em- 
ployed in suppressing the rebellion against the laws of 
the Greneral Government. 

" This requisition was followed by an intimation that 
another regiment might soon be required. The state 
of our militia organization was such that I could not, 
by a military order, fulfill the constitutional obligations 
of the State. Upon reflection, I came to the conclusion 
that I could meet this call with less delay and less ex- 
pense by a voluntary enlistment, than by any other 
method, and this course was adopted. The prompt and 
liberal manner in which our banks and citizens placed 
a large amount of money at my disposal, removed the 
necessity of convening a special session of the Legislature. 

" So unanimous was our whole population in resist- 
ing this attempt to overthrow the Constitution and lib- 
erties of the people, that the second regiment was 
filled as readily as the first. While the second regi- 
ment was organizing, and after the appointment of Col. 
T. P. Pierce, of Manchester, to its command, I received 
information from the War Department that it was the 
desire of the government that all future enlistments 
should be made for ' three years, or during the war,' 
and that men enlisted for three months, refusing to en- 
list for the war, be. discharged. In accordance with this 
suggestion I changed the term of enlistment, and over 
five hundred of those who had enlisted for three months 



ACTION OF THE STATE. 89 

re-enlisted for three years, and the entire regiment of 
one thousand and forty-six men was promptly made up. 

" Col. Pierce, whom I esteem a valuable officer, in 
consequence of the change in the term of service, hav- 
ing resigned his command, the Hon. Gilman Marston 
has been appointed to his place. This regiment has 
also been mustered into the service of the United States 
by Major Eastman, of the United States army, and is 
under drill at Portsmouth. It will leave in a few days for 
"Washington. So generously have our patriotic citizens 
responded to the call of the country, that many of the 
three months men, left at Fort Constitution, and others 
whd have enlisted for three years but are not required 
to complete the second regiment, will form a nucleus for 
a third Regiment, the enrollment of which can be readily 
accomplished if required ; otherwise they will serve to 
give efficiency to the re-organization of the State militia. 
A portion of the three months recruits has been placed 
by Maj. Gen. "Wool, at my suggestion, in Port Constitu- 
tion, for the defense of the harbor of Portsmouth, and 
by authority of Gen. "Wool and the Secretary of the 
!N"avy, I have put that fort in a condition of defense. 

" A rifle company, composed principally of Concord 
young men, of high character and sobriety, under com- 
mand of Capt. Griffin, of Concord, were desirous of 
being armed with Sharp's rifles, to fit them as skirm- 
ishers to the Second Eegiment. The citizens of Con- 
cord, together with many members of the company, 
subscribed an amount sufficient to pay for these rifles, 
provided the State would not assume the expense, and 
the arms have been furnished with the above under- 
standing. I am assured that the United States will 
ultimately pay for them. It is for you to decide 
whether the State will accept the responsibility for the 
present, or whether it will rest with the patriotic sub- 
scribers. 



90 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

"I communicate herewith a circular from^he Hon. 
Simon Cameron, Secretary of War, requesting that 
the several States will keep regiments enlisted and un- 
der drill, in their respective States, and prepared for 
service, upon call, and that when called into service of 
the TJnited States, their places may be supplied by new 
enlistments," 

The Peace Conference, referred to in G-ov. GToodwin's 
address, assembled at "Washington on the 4th of Feb- 
ruary, 1861 — one month before the inauguration of 
President Lincoln. Twenty states were represented, 
thirteen of which were free, and seven were slave states. 
The extreme South was resolved upon breaking up the 
Government, and establishing in its stead a slavehold- 
ing oligarchy, and they refused to take any part in the 
Peace Conference, notwithstanding the proposition for 
it came from the slaveholding State of Virginia. Ex- 
President John Tyler, of Virginia was made chairman. 

On motion of James Gurthrie, of Kentucky, a com- 
mittee of one from each State was appointed by the 
chair, on the nomination of the Commissioners thereof, 
to whom was referred the resolution of the State of Vir- 
ginia. Hon. Asa Fowler was appointed on the part 
of !ffew Hampshire. The Conference was in session 
twenty-one days, and came to the following result, 
which was published to the world as the basis for the 
settlement of all national differences : 

1. That Congress shall never interfere with slavery in 
the District of Columbia, over which, by the Constitu- 
tion, Congress held exclusive jurisdiction, without the 
consent of the slaveholding State of Maryland, and the 
consent of the slaveholders of the District. 

2. That Congress shall not forbid slaveholders from 
bringing their slaves td "Washington, nor abolish 



ACTION OF THE STATE. 91 

Blavery in any of the dockyards, fortresses, or territories 
under the jurisdiction of the United States, where 
slavery then existed. 

3. That Congress should not prohibit, and should so 
amend the Constitution, that the States should not pro- 
hibit, the transportation of slaves from and through any 
of the States and Territories, where slavery then ex- 
isted either by law or usage. 

The only concession exacted from the South was, that 
they should agree to the suppression of the slave trade, 
which was prohibited by Congress years before as pi- 
racy; that the District of Columbia should not be used 
as a slave market, which also had been forbidden by a 
previous compromise ; and that slavery should be pro- 
hibited in all the territory north of the parallel of 36° 
30' north latitude. 

Eleven states voted in favor and seven against these 
peace propositions, while two were divided in their vote. 
They were reported to Congress, and adopted in the 
House by 133 yeas to 65 nays, to be recommended to 
the people, but have never been heard of since. The 
South meant separation, and nothing else, and acted 
consistently with that idea. 

At the close of Grov. Groodwin's address, Nathaniel S. 
Berry, of Hebron, having been elected Governor .in 
March, appeared, accepted the office, took the oaths 
prescribed by the Constitution, and was declared by, 
Herman Foster, of Manchester, President of the Senate, 
Governor for the ensuing political year. He delivered 
his annual address, from which the following, relating 
to the rebellion, is extracted : 

" The seizure of forts, arsenals, mints and public 
property of the Union, and attacks on its flag, and 
the usurpation of powers of the General Government 
which we have recently witnessed, are high-handed acts 



92 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

of treason, without any justification, and based on the 
most groundless and frivolous pretenses. ISTo alegation 
or excuse has been given, or can be given, to justify the 
enormity of the offenses committed. On this ground 
our .people stand as one man. 

" The masses of the citizens of the different States 
may not be holden responsible for these acts of treason 
and rebellion, but their leaders must and will be so 
holden by the true men of this country and the indig- 
nant sentiment of the civilized world. The crimes 
committed against us, against the memory and labors 
of our fathers, and the common and best interests of 
humanity, we cannot excuse or tolerate. 

" We unite in the sentiments of "Washington, of "Web- 
ster, and of Jackson, as to the infinite moment of our 
I^ational Union to the collective and universal happi- 
ness of the American people; that we can have but 
' one country, one Constitution and one destiny ; ' and 
that by every hazard and by every sacrifice, the ' Union 
must be preserved.' 

""With the country divided into separate govern- 
ments, having long lines of border communications, we 
should be subject to continued strife; we could not live 
in peace as independent adjoining communities. The 
way of our fathers under the Constitution, rigidly ad- 
hered to by all sections, in its true force and spirit, is 
the only sure way of national prosperity. 

" The position taken by our government in the recent 
correspondence with the French Minister, is the only 
ground upon which we can stand : ' That there is not 
now, nor has there been, nor will there be, any, the 
least idea existing in this government of suffering a dis- 
solution of this Union to take place in any way what- 
ever.' 

"Under this enunciation of principles, the open, 
deadly, flagrant war which is now waged against the 




Snj Vceo E.Perme 




iecii 



ta^y^. 



NATHANIEL S.BERHY" 
Governor of KevT Hampshire 1861-62 




ACTION OF THE STATE. 93 

government of the United States, to compel acquies- 
cence in the dismemberment of the Union, will cease 
and come to an end, when the Constitution is main- 
tained and enforced, as under the better days of the 
Republic, under Washington and Adams, Jefferson and 
Jackson, and not till then. But in this view of our condi- 
tion we have a high and important duty to discharge. 

" Most of the loyal States of this Union have already 
holden special sessions of their Legislatures, to act on the 
immediate necessities of the crisis. The regular ses- 
sion of our Legislature was so near at hand, that a 
special session was not deemed essential with us ; 
especially considering the prompt and efficient 
measures taken by my predecessor. The Legislature 
being now assembled, there is a pressing necessity for 
immediate attention to those measures that shall aid 
the General Government in resisting the rebellion 
now waged against our institutions. 

" No northern State has placed less than a million of 
dollars at the command of the General Government, in 
view of the present emergency of the country, and I 
trust N"ew Hampshire will not be behind her sister 
States in this respect, and that whatever we may do 
may be done with perfect unanimity. 

"Li conclusion, permit me to recur to the great 
struggle with treason and rebellion, in which our coun- 
try is now engaged. It is a rebellion against the most 
beneficent government ever established upon earth. It 
threatens with extinguishment our Republic, which has 
been, and under God will continue to be, the light of 
nations. In open defiance of the great principle that 
the final supremacy of the will of the majority, consti- 
tutionally expressed, upon which the stability of repub- 
lican governments depend, this flagrant rebellion has 
been commenced. It is evidently the purpose of the 
rebel leaders to substitute, for the rule of the majority, 



94 THE QBE AT BEBELLION. 

the rule of the minority, with the natural result of 
anarchy or despotism. 

" The deep and holy enthusiasm with which the peo- 
ple of the loyal States have responded to the call of the 
government for military aid to put down the rebellion 
and crush out treason, can leave no doubt of the final 
result of the struggle, Never in the history of the 
world was there witnessed a prouder spectacle than the 
loyal patriotism which was aroused in the land by the 
guns of Sumter. Party spirit was hushed, and twenty 
millions of freemen, with one accord, joined han^s in 
solemn pledge that the Union, Constitution and Gov- 
ernment shall be maintained. 

" The result of the conflict will be the convincing of 
the world that a republican government can and will be 
sustained. It may be that our country must be shaken 
from center to circumference by the mighty struggle ; 
that liberty must be again baptized in blood; but the 
principles upon which the republic was founded will be 
vindicated and made permanent ; the Constitution will 
be sustained ; the constitutional rights of all American 
citizens, in all the States, will receive new guarantees ; 
the freedom of speech and of the press every where in 
our land will be effectually secured, and the govern- 
ment will come forth purified and strengthened. 

" "We acknowledge the dependence of all rulers and 
states on Him by whom all government is ordained. 
"We cannot believe that He who was the God of our 
fathers, and under whose protecting care our country 
has risen from feebleness to strength, will permit the 
great experiment of free government to fail, or come 
short of the ultimate complete security of our greatness 
and happiness as a united people." 

At an early stage of the session a bill was introduced 
in the Legislature entitled " An Act to aid in the de- 



ACTION OF TEE STATE. 95 

fense of the country," whicli, after much discussion and 
strenuous opposition from a portion of the members, 
was passed, as follows : 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of EepresenMives, 
in General Court convened : 

Section 1. All payments and expenditures made by 
the Governor and Council, or by their authority and 
direction, in order to furnish troops from this State for 
the defense of the United States, or for enlisting, arm- 
ing, equipping, disciplining, maintaining or transport- 
ing said troops, or in any way connected therewith, are 
hereby approved, ratified and confirmed. 

Sec. 2. In order to answer any call for troops from 
this State that has been or may be made by the Presi- 
dent of the United States, or by his sanction and au- 
thority, the Governor, with the advice and consent of 
the Council, is hereby vested with full power and 
authority to take such measures as may be deemed best, 
ft)r the enlisting, arming, equipping, disciplining, main- 
taining and transporting such military force of this State 
as in his judgment may be needed for defending and 
maintaining, in its full integrity, the authority of the 
government of the United States, and the constitution 
and the laws thereof; and to this end he may, with the 
advice and consent of the Council, appoint all needful 
officers and agents, and may fix their rank and pay; 
provided that at no one time more than two regiments 
shall be enlisted in addition to those that shall have 
been already mustered into the service of the United 
States. 

Sec. 3. The Governor, with the advice and consent 
of the Council, is hereby authorized to pay from the 
money appropriated by this act, any of the troops of 
this State which have been or may be mustered into 
the service of the United States, during the whole or any 



96 THE aBEAT REBELLION. 

part of the time of sucli service; and the Governor, 
with the advice and consent of the Council, is hereby 
authorized and empowered to negotiate, adjust and set- 
tle all questions, accounts, matters, and things, between 
this State and the United States, in any way arising 
from or growing out of the contracts and expenditures 
mentioned in this act, or out of any contracts or ex- 
penditures which may be made for the public defense 
or the payment of troops. 

Sec. 4. For the purpose of meeting the expenses 
already incurred, or any that may be incurred under this 
act, or any other act to provide for 'the defense of the 
country, or for maintaining the military force of this 
State, while engaged therein, the Treasurer of this State 
is hereby authorized, under the sanction of the Gov- 
ernor, with the advice and consent of the Council, to 
issue bonds or certificates of debt, in the name and on 
behalf of this State, to an amount not exceeding oi^e 
million dollars. Said bonds shall bear interest not ex- 
ceeding six per cent, per annum, payable semi-annually, 
on the first days of January and July, in each year, and 
may be i-ssued at such times and in sums of such amount 
as shall be fixed by the Governor and Council. All 
such bonds shall have interest warrants or coupons at- 
tached thereto, signed" by the Treasurer; and said bonds 
and coupons shall be made payable at the Suffolk Bank, 
Boston. ' Said bonds or certificates of debt shall be re- 
deemable in not less than five or jnore than twenty 
years from the first day of July, A. D. 1861, and not 
more than one hundred thousand dollars shall be re- 
deemable in any one year. Said bonds shall be counter- 
signed by the Governor, and shall be deemed a pledge 
of the faith and credit of the State. The Secretary of 
State shall keep a record of all the bonds countersigned 
by the Governor, in which shall be set down the num- 
ber and amount of each bond so counteraigned; the time 



AVTION OF TEE STATE. 97 

of such countersigning ; the time when sjich bond shall 
be payable ; the name of the person to whom said bond 
may be delivered, and the date of such delivery. The 
Treasurer may, from time to time, under the direction 
of the Governor and Council, dispose of so much of the 
same as shall be required, and for that purpose shall ad- 
vertise', at any time, for proposals for so much as may 
be needed. And said Treasurer shall keep a record of 
each bond disposed of by him, which shall contain the 
name of the person to whom each bond may be sold, 
and the number thereof, the amount received by him 
therefor, the date of such sale, and the time of the pay- 
ment therefor. 

Sec. 5. This act shall be in force from and after its 
passage. 

Approved July 3, 1861. 

This act passed the House by yeas 169, nays 94 ; and 
the Senate by yeas 10, nays 2. 

Harry Bingham, of Littleton, presented in the House, 
a protest to the passage of this act, signed by himself 
and ninety other members, with the following reasons 
therefor : 

1. BecauSe, the bill compels us to approve, ratify and 
confirm "All payments made by the Governor and 
Council, or by their authority and direction, in order to 
furnish troops from the State for the defense of the United 
States, or for enlisting, arming, equipping, disciplining, 
maintaining or transporting said troops, or in any way 
connected therewith;" of the nature, extent, validity 
and equity of which we know so little as to be entirely 
unable to form any definite judgment relative thereto, 
and because, from any information communicated to 
this House, we can not assure ourselves or our constitu- 
ents that it would be safe and proper for us thus to ap- 
prove, ratify and confirm. 



98 THE a BEAT REBELLION. 

2. Because, ty the provisions of this bill, the power to 
consider and determine what appropriations are neces- 
sary, and what disposition has been and shall be made 
of the money of the people, how and by what agents 
disbursed, and in what manner accounted for, is taken 
from the representatives of the people, to whom such 
power constitutionally belongs, and surrendered to the 
executive branch of the government. 

3. Because we can not permit transactions of any 
branch of the government to be sealed up from the 
eyes of the people, or to be placed beyond their power 
to examine, inspect, and judge. 

4. Because we can not regard the action of this House, 
in the rejection of the amendments proposed to the bill, 
as other than the assurance that the present war may 
be waged by unlawful means, for conquest, subjugation, 
national consolidation, and the extinguishment of State 
sovereignties, and we are unalterably opposed to the 
attainment, by any means, of such objects. 

The protestants in their document disavowed all con- 
siderations and motives of a partisan character, and 
claimed to act only for the rights and interests of the 
people, as guaranteed by the Constitution. 

Another act was passed authorizing cities and towns 
to aid the families of volunteers, and for other purposes, 
as follows : , ' 

Be it enacted ly the Senate and House of SepresentaUves, in 
General Court convened, as follows. • 

Section 1. That any city or town may raise money 
by taxation, or otherwise, and, if necessary, apply the 
same under the direction of the mayor and aldermen of 
such city, or a committee by them appointed for that pur- 
pose, or of the selectmen of such town, or a committee 
chosen at any meeting duly held for that purpose, for 
the aid of the wife, and of the children under sixteen 



ACTION OF THE STATE. 99 

years of age, of any inliabitaiit of sucli city or town 
who, as a member of the volunteer or enrolled militia 
of this State, may have been mustered into, or enlisted 
in the service of the United States, and for each parent 
or child of such inhabitant, who, at the time of his en- 
listment, was dependent on him for support : Provided, 
such persons are indigent, and stand in need of such 
relief; and no disabilities of any kind whatever shall be 
created by reason of aid so furnished and received. 

Sec. 2. Any city or town may raise money, by vote, 
to defray any expense already incurred, or to carry out 
and fulfill any contract heretofore made with or in be- 
half of any of its inhabitants, or their families or de- 
pendents, which inhabitants may have been called or 
enlisted into the service of the United States; but all 
existing contracts between any town or city, and any 
of its inhabitants, or their families or dependents, shall 
terminate in ninety days from the date of such contract, 
or the date of such inhabitants' enlistment, if subsequent 
to such contract and before the passage of this act. 

Sec. 3. Of the sums paid or applied by any city or 
town for tibe support of the family or dependents of any 
inhabitant who may be actually engaged in the service 
of the United States, as provided in the first section of 
this act, there shall be annually reimbursed from the 
treasury of the State, to such city or town, a sum not 
exceeding one dollar per week for the wife, and one 
dollar per week for each child or parent of such inhabit- 
ant, who, at the time of his being called or enlisting in- 
to the service of the United States, was dependent upon 
him for support : Provided, that the whole sum so reim- 
bursed shall not exceed twelve dollars per month for all 
the persons named in this section so dependent upon 
any such inhabitant. 

Sec. 4. N'o reimbursement shall be allowed from the 
State treasury to any city or town, as provided in the 



100 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

preceding section, until a fall report, certified and 
sworn to by a majority of the selectmen or committee 
of such town, and by the mayor and a majority of the 
aldermen of such city, containing a statement of the 
names and service of the inhabitants of such city or 
town, whose families or dependents have been assisted, 
as provided in the first section of this act; and the 
names of the persons assisted, and the relations which 
such persons severally bear to such inhabitants respec- 
tively, and the sums paid to or for the support of each 
person, shall have been made to the Treasurer of the 
State, and carefully examined and approved by him. 

Sec. 5. A statement, certified and sworn to by a ma- 
jority of the board of selectmen of any town, or by the 
mayor and a majority of the aldermen of any city, shall 
be made to the State Treasurer on or before the first 
Wednesday of June annually, of the full amount due 
such town or city for aid furnished in accordance with 
the provisions of this act. 

Sec. 6. This act shall take efiect upon its passage. 

Approved July 4, 1861. 

The following resolutions passed both branches of 
the Legislature, unanimously : 

Resolved by the Senate and House Representatives of the 
State of New Hampshire in General Court convened : That 
the contest now existing between the Government and 
the disloyal people that have commenced an unjustifiable 
and treasonable war upon its constitutional authority, 
should be regarded by all loyal men not as a sectional 
war, not an anti-slavery war, nor a war of conquest and 
subjugation, but simply and solely a war for the main- 
tenance of the Government, the suppressioja of rebellion, 
and the preservation of the magna charta of our liberty 
and national unity. 



ACTION OF TEE STATE. 101 

Besolved, That the State of 3^ew Hampshire pledges 
her resources for the integrity of the tTnion, for the 
support of the Constitution, and for the enforcement of 
the laws of the General Government. 

Resolved, That the Constitution is the supreme law of 
the land, and that no State has the jight to secede 
therefrom and dissolve the Union which that^Constitu- 
tion was made to secure. 

Mesolved, That the duty of the General Government 
to suppress all attempts to dissolve the Union is impera^ 
tive, and can not be evaded. 

Mesolved, That neither the President nor Congress 
can constitutionally entertain any proposition which 
has for its object the dismemberment of the Govern- 
ment or th^ dissolution of the Union. 

Mesolved, That in the language of Andrew Jackson, 
" The Federal Union must be preserved." 

Mesolved, That the Secretary of the State be directed 
to send copies of these resolutions to the President of 
the United States, the presiding of&cer of each House 
of Congress, the Governors of the several States, and 
each Senator and Representative of this State in Con- 
gress. 

Approved July 4, 1861. 

Resolutions were unanimously passed by the Legisla- 
ture thanking the Sons of l^ew Hampshire in New York 
and Boston, and the citizens of "Worcester, Mass., for 
their attentions to the First and Second Ifew Hamp- 
shire Regiments. 

The Executive Council, on whom, with the Governor, 
was imposed the duty of enlisting, arming, equipping 
and holding subject to orders from the War Depart- 
ment troops from the State, were R. P. J. Tenney, of 
Pittsfield ; Daniel Sawyer, of Alton ; Moody Currier, 
of Manchester ; Charles F. Brooks, of Westmoreland, 



102 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

and Denison R. Burnham, of Plymoutli. Allen Tenney, 
of Concord, was Secretary of State, and Peter Sanborn, 
of Concord, , State Treasurer, — chosen by the Legisla- 
ture. Joseph C. Abbott, of Manchester, having re- 
signed, Ex-Governor Anthony Colby, of New London, 
was appointed by the Governor and Council, Adjutant 
and Inspector-General, in June, 1861. 

Ladies organized sanitary aid societies in almost 
every considerable town in the State, and furnished the 
men who enlisted with flannel underclothing and many 
other articles for their health and comfort, not supplied 
by the government; and sent to the army hospitals 
beds, bedding, clothing, bandages, wines, jellies, dried 
fruits, and indeed every thing needed for the sick and 
wounded soldiers. They continued their labors and 
good offices, with efficiency and system, without inter- 
mission, throughout the war, and did much to add to 
the comfort of soldiers' families during the absence of 
their protectors and supporters. 



8EG0SD REGIMENT. 103 

SECOND REGIMENT. 



After the organization of tlie First Regiment, the 
surplus of men at Camp TJnion were sent to Camp Con- 
stitution, Portsmouth, for the purpose of forming the 
Second Regiment. They were quartered in rope-walks 
and adjacent buildings, which had been converted into 
comfortable barracks, in the southern part of the city. 
On the 10th of May nine hundred and seventy-nine 
men — all enlisted for three months — had arrived at camp 
and were being drilled, disciplined and made acquain- 
ted with the duties pertaining to a soldier's life, by Col. 
Thomas P. Pierce, of Manchester, who had been com- 
missioned Colonel of the regiment, when an order came 
to the Grovernor from the War Department to send no 
more three month's troops. In consequence of this 
change in the term of service. Col. Pierce resigned on 
the 4th of June, and Hon. Gilman Marston, of Exeter, 
then a member of Congress from the First District, was 
commissioned Colonel of the three years regiment, and 
immediately assumed command. 

The following were the commissioned officers of the 
regiment during its whole term of service, and their 
record as appears upon the books in^ the Adjutant Gen- 
eral's office, with such corrections as could be obtained : 

FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS. 

Colonels — Thomas P. Pierce, of Manchester. 

Besigned June 4, 1861. 

Gilman Marston, of Exeter. 
Wounded July 21, 1861, at Bull Run. Promoted to Brigadier General U. S. 
Volunteers, April 17, 1863. 

Edward L. Bailey, of Manchester. 
Slightly wounded at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863. Mustered out June 29, 1864. 



104 TSE QBEAT BEBELLION. 

Joab 'S. Patterson, of Hopkinton. 

Appointed Brevet Brig. Gen. TJ. S. Volunteers, in 1865. Mustered out as 
Colonel, Dec. 19, 1865. 

Lieut. Colonels — Francis S. Fiske, of Keene. 

Resigned Oct. 23, 1862. 

Edward L. Bailey, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Colonel April 18, 1863 

James "W. Carr, of Manchester. 
Slightly wounded at Gettysburg, July 2, 1868. Mustered out June 21 , 1864. 

Joab iN". Patterson, of Hopkinton. 

Promoted to Colonel Jan. 10, 1865. 

John D. Cooper, of Concord. 

Died of disease, at Baltimore, Oct. 80, 1865. 

Majors — Josiah Stevens, Jr., of Concord. 

Resigned July 25, 1862. 

Edward L. Bailey, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Lieut. Col. Oct. 23, 1862. 

James "W". Carr, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Lieut. Colonel April 18, 1863. 

Samuel P. Sayles, of Dover. 

Severely wounded at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863. Mustered out June 21, 1864. 

John D. Cooper, of Concord. 

Promoted to Lieut Colonel March 1, 1865. 

Levi N. Converse, of Keene. 

Promoted to Lieut. Colonel Nov. 1, 1865, but not mustered. Mustered out as 
Major Dec. 19, 1865. 

Adjutants — Samuel Gr. Langley, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Lieut. Colonel of the Fifth Regiment Oct. 26, 1861. 

Center H. Lawrence, of Fitchburg, Mass. 

Appointed A. A. Gen. U. S. Vols. Sept. 1, 1862. 

Albert M. Perkins, of Exeter. 

Promoted to Captain June 18, 1863. 

John D. Cooper, of Concord. 

Severely wounded at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863. Pro. to Major June 21, 1864. 

Edgar B. LeGro, of Somersworth. 

Promoted to Captain Nov. 1, 1864. 

Charles E. Plaisted, of Portsmouth. 

Promoted to Captain Nov. 1, 1865. 

Quartermasters — John S. Godfrey, of Hampton Falls. 

Promoted to Captain and A. Q. M. Vols. Aug. 21, 1861. 

Francis W. Perkins, of Concord. 

Promoted to Capt. and A. Q. M. Vols. June 9, 1862. 

James A. Cook, of Cornish. 

Promoted to Captain and Com. Sub. U. S. Vols. July 2, X863. Honorably 
discharged for disability, Sept. 1864. 



SECOND REGIMENT. 105 

Charles H. Shute, of Concord. 

Mustered out June 21, 1864. 

Abner F. Durgin, of Fisherville. 

Mustered out Deo. 19, 1865. 

Surgeons — George H. Hubbard, of Manchester. 

Eeeigned Oct. 1, 1861. 
James M. Merrow, of Rollinsford. 

Mustered out June 21, 1864. 

William P. Stone, of Danbury. 

Mustered out Dec. 19, 1866. 

Assistant Surgeons — George P. Greeley, of Nashua. 

Besigned June 8, 1861. 

James M. Merrow, of Rollinsford. 

Promoted to Surgeon Oct 2, 1861. 

Oscar Worthley, of Stewartstown. 

Kesigned Sept. 17, 1862. 

William P. Stone, of Danbury. 

Promoted to Surgeon July 6, 1864. 

"William G. Stark, of Manchester. 

Mustered out Dec. 19, 1865. 

"WUlard C. Kempton, of Plainfield. 

Mustered out Dec. 19, 1865. 

Chaplains — Henry E. Parker, of Concord. 

Resigned July 14, 1862. 

George S. Barnes, of Seabrook. 

Beeigned April 26, 1868. 

John W. Adams, of Salem. 

Mustered out Deo. 19, 1865. 

Sergeant Majors — George "W". Gordon, of Allenstown. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. July 29, 1861. 

Center H. Lawrence, of Fitchburg, Mass. 

Promoted to Adjutant, Oct. 26, 1861. 

Norton E.. Moore, of Goffstown. 

Promoted to Second Lieutenant, July 11, 1862. 

Henry Haywood, of Dover. 

Promoted to Fii-st Lieut. Aug. 25, 1862. 

Frank C, "Wasley, of Manchester. 

Promoted to First Lieut. June 18, 1868. 

Alvin S. "Wiggin, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. June 18, 18G3. 

James E. Saunders, of Peterborough. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. May 11, 1864. 

Edgar B. LeGro, of Somersworth. 

Promoted to Adjutant, July 1, 1864. 



106 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

Edward Clark, of Hooksett. 

Promfoted to First Lieut. Not. 8, 1864. 
Edwin Richardson, of ]!^elson. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Jan. 8, 1865. 

Charles H. Streeter, of Portsmouth. 

Promoted to First Lieut May 1, 1865. 

■William "Williams, of Lebanon. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. July 26, 1865. 

James Downey. 

Mustered out Dec. 19, 1866. 

Quartermaster Sergeants — F. W. Perkins of Concord. 

irromoted to First Lieut.- and Quartermaster, Aug. 21, 1861. 

Charles H. Shute, of Concord. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. Aug. 10, 1862. 

Joseph H. Wilkinson, of Fisherville. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. Dec. 16, 1863. 

Abner F. Durgin, of Fisherville. 

Be-enlisted, Jan. 1, 1864. Promoted to First Lieut, and Quartermaster, 
June 24, 1864. 

Frank H. Hervey, of Exeter. 

Promoted to First Lieut May 20, 1865. 

Richard W. Robinson, of Concord. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. Nov. 1, 1865. 

Commissary Sergeants — James A. Cook, of Cornish. 

Promoted to First Lieut, and Quartermaster, June 9, 1862. 

William J. Rahn, of Keene. 

Mustered out June 21, 1864. 

Oliver M. Dame, of Portsmouth. 

Promoted to First Lieut May 20, 1865. 

Francis E. Paris, of GofiEstown. 

Mustered out Dec. 19, 1865. 

Hospital Stewards — William G. Stark, of Manchester. 

Discharged for disability, Jan. 22, 1863. Be-enlisted Jan. 1, 1864. Pro- 
moted to Aast. Surgeon, June 24, 1864. 

George BuUen, of Manchester. 

Discharged for disability, Feb. 17, 1865. 

William Clifford, of !N"ashua. 

Mustered out Dec. 19, 1865. 

Principal Musicians — ^Daniel W. Newell, of Manchester. 

Discharge for disability, Jan. 22, 1868. 

Stephen J. Smiley, 

Mustered out June 21, 1864. 
Nathaniel M. Ricker, of Portsmouth. 
Be-^nlisted Jan. 1, 1864. Deserted at Warsaw, Va., Sept, 30, 1865. 



SECOND BEQIMENT. 107 

Simeon Partridge, of Concord. 

Mustered out June 18, 1865. 
Arthur E. Buckminster, of Manchester. 

Mustered out Dec. 19, 1865. 

COMPANY OFFICERS. 

Co. A. — Captains — Tileston A. Barker, of Keene. 

Besigned Sept. 1. 1862. 

Levi N. Converse, of Keene, 

Lost right arm at Gettysburg, July 2, 1868. Promoted to Major May 8, 
1866. 

Edward Clark, of Hooksett. 

Mustered out Dec. 19, 1866. 

rirst Lieuts. — ^Henry M. Metcalf, of Keene. 

Promoted to Gapt Aug. 18, 1862. EiUed at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863. 

Herbert B. Titus, of Chesterfield. 

Promoted to Major 9th Beg. June 14, 1862. 

Frederick "W". Cobb, of Keene. 

Besigned Aug. 31, 1862. 
Levi E". Converse, of Keene. 

Promoted to Captain, July 2, 1863. 

Silas Hayward, of Fitzwilliam. 

Mustered out June 21, 1864. 

Samuel F. Holbrook. 

Promoted to Captain, April 1, 1866. 

Oliver M. Dame^ of Portsmouth. 

Honorably discharged, Sept. 25, 1865. 

■John E. Hartwell, of Chester. 

Mustered out Dec. 19, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — Herbert B. Titus, of Chesterfield. 

Promoted to First Lieut. June, 1862. 

Frederick W, Cobb, of Keene. 

Promoted to First Lieut. July 1, 1862. 

Levi N". Converse, of Keene. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Aug. 81, 1862. 

Silas Hayward, of Fitzwilliam. 

Promoted to First Ueut. July 2. 1863. 

Robert Miller. 

Mustered out June 21, 1864. 

"William "Williams, of Lebanon. 

Dismissed, Nov. 1, 1866. 

John W, Hammond, of "Winchester. 

Not mustered. Mustered out, Dec. 19, 1865. 



108 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

Co. B, — Captains — Simon G. Griffin, of Concord. 

Promoted to Lieut. Colonel 6th Kegt. Oct. 26, 1861. 

Abiel "W". Colby, of Concord. 

Died May 13, 1862. 

Josepli A. Hubbard, of Manchester. 

Killed at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863. 

"William H. Smith, of Exeter. "^ 

Died of wounds, July 7, 1864. 

George T. Carter, of Concord. 

Promoted to Major, Not. 1, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Charles W. Walker, of Concord. 

Killed on cars en route to Washington, June 31, 1861. 

Abiel W. Colby, of Concord. 

Promoted to Captain, Nov. 1, 1861. 

George "W. Boyden, of Concord. 

Resigned May 20, 1862. 

"William "W. Ballard, of Boscawen. 

Killed at Getlysburg, July 2, 1863. 

George M. Shute, of Concord. 

Mustered out June 21, 1864. 

Frank "W. Morgan, of Hopkinton. 

Promoted to Captain, April 1, 1866. 

Lewis "Wood, of Somersworth. 

Mustered out Deo. 19, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — ^Abiel W. Colby, of Concord. 

Promoted to First Lieut. July 1, 1861. 

Charles Holmes, of Hopkinton. 

Promoted to Captain 17th TJ. S. Infantry, Not. 11, 1861. 

William W. Ballard, of Boscawen. 

Promoted to First Lieut. July 11, 1862. 

John D. Cooper, of Concord. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Aug. 1, 1862. 

George M. Shute, of Concord, 
SeTerdy wounded at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863. Promoted to First Lieut 
July 3, 1863. 

Eufus L. Bean, of Portsmouth. 

Transferred to Company O. 

Thomas Lees, of Durham. 

Mustered out June 21, 1864. 

Benjamin P. Peters. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Aug. 24, 1865. 

James Harvey, of New Hampton. 

Mustered out Dec. 19, 1865. 



SECOND REGIMENT. 109 

Co. C. — Captains — John W. Carr, of Manchester. 

Fromoted to Major, Oct. 23, 1862. 

John F, Hodman, of Somersworth. 

Kesigned June 18, 1863. 

George W. Roberts, of Dover. 

KUled at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863. 

Hugh R. Kichardson, of Lancaster. 

Mustered out June 21, 1864. 

Edward D. Bean, of "Biddeford, Me. . 

Mustered out Dec. 19, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — James H. Piatt, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Captain, Aug. 10, 1862. 

George "W. Roberts, of Dover. 

Promoted to Captain, JunQ 18, 1863. 

James H. Baker, of Farmington. 

Gh"ansferred to Company F. 

Silas L. Hayward, of Fitzwilliam. 

Transferred to Company A, 

Frank C. Wasley, of Manchester. 
Seyerdy wounded at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863. Mustered out June 21 , 1864. 

Edward D. Bean, of Biddeford, Me. 

Promoted to Captain, Not. 2, 1864. 
Milan D. Spaulding, of Keene. 

Honorably discharged, May 11, 1865. 

Frank H. Hervey, of Exeter. 

Not mustei-ed. Mastered out June 12, 1865. 

James A. Sanborn, of Portsmouth. 

Declined, Aug. 4, 1865. 

Samuel F. Patterson, of Concord. 

Mustered out, Dec. 19, 1865. , 

Second Lieuts. — S. 0. Burnham, of Pembroke. 

Promoted to Captain, Aug. 25, 1862. 

Frank C. "Wasley, of Manchester. 

Pramoted to First Lieut. June 18, 1863. 

William C. Montgomery, of Hopkinton. 
' Transferred to Company H, 

Joseph H. "Wilkinson. 

Mustered out, June 21, 1864. 

James A. Hutton, of Portsmouth. 

Mustered out, Dec. 19, 1865. 

Co. D. — Captains — ^Hiram Rollins, of Dover. 

Transferred to Company K, Aug. 1, 1861, 

Samuel P. Sayles, of Dover. 

Promoted to Major, April 18, 1863. 



110 THE QBEAT REBELLION. 

George E. Sides, of Portsmouth. 

Transferred to Company K. 

Albert M. Perkins, of Exeter. 
Severely wounded at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863. Mustered out June 21, 18G4. 

Edgar B. LeGrro, of Somersworth. 

Mustered out Dec. 19, 1865. 

First Lieuts.— Samuel P. Sayles, of Dover. 

Promoted to Captain Aug. 1, 1861 

"Warren H. Parmenter, of Dover. 

Resigned July 8, 1862. 

George W. Gordon, of AUenstown. 

Promoted to Captain Sept. 1, 1862. 

Henry Hayward, of Dover. 

Promoted to Captain May 25, 1864, 

David M. Perkins, of Manchester. 

Mustered out June 21, 1864 

George W. Fixon, of Pembroke. 

Dismissed Jan. 7, 1865. 

Edward Richardson, of Nelson. 

Honorably discliarged May 11, 1865. 

Charles E. Jones, of Milton. 

Mustered out. Dec. 19, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — W. H. Parmenter, of Dover. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Aug. 1, 1861. 

George W. Roberts, of Dover. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Aug. 10, 1862. 

Charles H. Shute, of Concord. 

Promoted to First Lieut. April 18, 1863. 

Enoch G. Adams, of Durham. 

Promoted to Captain U. S. Vols. April 80, 1864. 

James E. Saunders, of Peterborough. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Jnne 24, 1864. 

Edwin Haines, of Lancaster County, Pa. 
Musteaed out Deo. 19, 1865 

Co. E. — Captains — ^Leonard Drown, of Fisherville. 

Killed at Williamsburg, May 5, 1862. 

William H. Smith, of Exeter. 

Transferred to Company B. 

James H. Piatt, of Manchester. 

KiUed May 16, 1864. 
Henry Hayward, of Dover. 

Killed at Cold Harbor, June 3, 1864. 
James E. Saunders,, of Peterborough. 

Honorably discharged May 80, 1864. 



SECOND BEOIMENT. Ill 

Daniel W. Bohonon. 

Mustered out Dec. 19, 1865. 

First Lieuts.— William H. Smith, of Exeter. 

Promoted to Captadu Aug. 1, 1862. 

Isaac K". Vesper, of Fisherville. 

Besigned May 6, 1863. 

Jacob Hall, of Barrington. 

Severely wounded at Gettysburg July 2, 1863. Mustered out June 21, 1864. 

Charles McGlaughlin, of Manchester. 

Honorably discharged May 17, 1866. 

Charles H. Streeter, of Portsmouth. 

Honorably discharged Aug. 16, 1866. 

Benjamin F. Peters. 

Mustered out Dec. 19, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — Ai B. Thompson, of Concord. 

Promoted to Captain U S. Army Aug. 7, 1861. 

Albert M. Perkins, of Exeter. 

Promoted to Adjutant Sept. 1, 1862 

William H. Colcord, of Exeter. 

Promoted to First Lieut July 2, 1863 

John W. Lord, of Somersworth. 
' Wounded at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863. Mustered out June 21, 1864. 

James H. Andrews, of Portsmouth. 

Honorably discharged Oct. 20, 1865. 

Charles W. Dimond, of Contoocook. 

Mustered out Deo. 19, 1865. 

Co. F.— Captains — Thomas Snow, of Somersworth. 

Resigned Aug. 12, 1862 

Henry M. Metcalf, of Keene. 

Killed at Gettysburg July 2, 1863 

David Steele, of Antrim, 

Transferred to Company O 

Harrison D. F. Young, of Lancaster. 

Mustered out June 21, 1864, 

Frank W. Morgan, of Hopkinton. 

Mustered out Dec. 19, 1866. 

First Lieuts. — J, F, Littlefield, of Somersworth. 

Promoted to Captain Aug, 1, 1861, 

Henry M, Metcalf, of Keene, 

Promoted to Captain Aug, 18, 1862, 

Hugh R, Richardson, of Lancaster. 
SeTei«Iy wounded at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863, Promoted to Captain July 
4. 1863, 



112 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

Alvin S. Wiggin, of Manchester. 

Transferred to Company L 

James H. Baker, of Farmington. 

Mustered out June 21, 1864. 

Henry A. Flint, of Farmington. 

Cashiered Feb. 4, 1865. 

Gilman T. Gould, of Peterborough. 

Mustered out Sec. 19, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — ^H. D. F. Young, of Lancaster. 

Promoted to First Lieut. July 11, 1862. 

K'orton R. Moore, of Goffstown. 

Died Aug. 29, 1862. 

James H. Baker, of Farmiugton. 

Promoted to First Lieut. June 18, 1863. 

Alvin S. Wiggin, of Manchester. 

Promoted to First Lieut. July 4, 1863. 

James H. Swain. 

Wounded May 9, 1864. Mustered out June 21, 1864. 

Joseph Lemmons, of Manchester. 

Mustered out Dec. 19, 1865. 

Co. Or. — Captains — Ephraim "Weston, of Hancock. 

Died Dec. 9, 1861. 
Evarts "W. Farr, of Littleton. 

Resigned Sept. 4, 1862. 
James H. Piatt, of Manchester. 

Transferred to Company £. 
David Steele, of Antrim. 

Mustered out June 21, 1864. 
George F. Holbrook. 

Mustered out Deo. 19, 1865. 

First Lieuts.— Evarts "W. Farr, of Littleton. 

Promoted to Captain Jan. 1, 1862. 

Sylvester Rogers, of ^tfashua. 

Killed at Bull Run, Aug. 29, 1862. 

David Steele, of Antrim. 
Severdy wounded at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863. Promoted to Captain July 
3,1863. 

George M. Shute, of Concord. 

Transferred to Company B. 
Hiram K. Ladd, of Haverhill. 

Mustered out June 21, 1864. 

James E. Saunders, of Peterborough. 

Promoted to Captain July 10, 1864. 



SECOND BEGIMENT. 113 

Charles A. Locke, of Loudon. 

Honorably discharged May 11, 1866. 

James "W. Felt, of Winchester. 

Mustered out Dec. 19, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — Sylvester Rogers, of N'ashua. 

, Promoted to First Lieut. Jan. 1, 1862. 

David Steele, of Antrim. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Aug. 1, 1862. 

Edmund Dascomb, of Greenfield. 

Died of wounds July 13, 1863. 

John McDonald, of Portsmouth. 

Transferred to Company K. 

Eufiis L. Bean, of Portsmouth. 

Dismissed May 7, 1864. 

John E. Hartwell, of Chester. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Sept. 20, 1865. 

Freeman F. Sanborn, of Portsmouth. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Nov. 1, 1865. 

Co. H. — Captains — Ichabod Pearl, of Great Falls. 

Besigned Aug. 12, 1861. 

Joshua F. Littlefield, of Somersworth. 

Transferred to Company B, May 23, 1862. 

Joab N". Patterson, of Hopkinton. 
Severely wounded at Gettysburg, July 3, 1863. Promoted to Lieut. Colonel 
June 21, 1864. 

Albert J. Hanson, of Great Falls. 

Mustered out Dec. 19, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — ^Joab IS". Patterson, of Hopkinton. 

Promoted to Captain May 23, 1862. 

Harrison D. F. Young, of Lancaster. 

Promoted to Captain Aug. 20, 1862. 

John D. Cooper, of Concord. 

Promoted to Adjutant June 18, 1863. 

Andrew G. Bracy, of Somersworth. 

Mustered out June 21, 1864. 

Albert J. Hanson, of Great Falls. 

Promoted to Captain, Nov. 3, 1864. 

Edward Clark, of Hooksett. 

Promoted to Captain, July 11, 1865. 

Henry -C. Tyler, of Portsmouth. 

Not mustered. Mustered out Dec. 19, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — ^Wm. H. Prescott, of Concord. 

Promoted to Captain U. S. Army, Aug. 7, 1861. 

John F. Holman, of Somersworth. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Sept. 2, 1862. 



114 THE ORE AT REBELLION. 

Andrew G. Bracy, of Somersworth. 

Promoted to Captain, June 18, 1863. 

William Montgomery, of Hopkinton. 

Mustered out June 21, 1864. 

James Thompson, of Portsmouth. 

Not mustered. Died^it Warsaw, Va., Nov. 10, 1865. 

George 0. Stephens, of Jaffrey. 

Not mustered. Mustered out Deo. 19, 1865. 

Oo. I. — Captains — ^Edward L. Bailey, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Major, July 26, 1862. 

Joseph A. Hubhard, of Manchester. 

Transferred to Company B, Oct. 12, 1862. 

George W. Gordon, of Allenstown. 

Slightly wounded at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863. Killed at Cold Harbor, June 
8, 1864. 

Thomas E. Marshall, of Mason. 

Mustered out Dec. 19, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — J. A. Hubbard, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Captain, July 26, 1862 

Oscar A. Moar, of Manchester. 

Died of disease, July 31, 1863. 

Hiram K. Ladd, of Haverhill. 

Transferred to Company G. 

Alvin S. "Wiffgin, of Manchester. 

Mustered out June 21, 1864 

Thomas E. Marshall, of Mason. 

Promoted to Captain, April 27, 1865. 

Robert C. Sides, of Portsmouth. 

Promoted to Adjutant, Not. 1, 1866 

Freeman F. Sanborn, of Portsmouth. 

Not mustered. Mustered out Dec. 19, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — J. A. Hubbard, of Manchester. 

Promoted to First Lieut. July 29, 1861. 

George "W. Gordon, of Allenstown. 

Promoted to Captain, Sept. 1, 1862 

Charles Vickery, of Manchester. 
Taken prisoner at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863. Died of wounds July 10, 1863. 

Eobert L. Miller. 

Transferred to Company A. 

David M. Perkins, of Manchester. 

Promoted to First Lieut May 25, 1864. 

George T. Carter, of Concord. 

Promoted to Captain, June 24, 1864. 



SECOND REGIMENT. 115 

Richard W. Robinson, of Concord. 

Not mustered. Mustered out Deo. 19, 1865. 

Co. K — Captains — ■William 0. Sides, of Portsmouth. 

Resigned. July, 1861. 

Hiram Rollins, of Dover. 

Sererdy wounded at Boll Run, July 21, 1861. Honorably discharged on 
aooount of wounds, Oct. 14, 1862. 

Samuel 0. Burnham, of Pembroke. 

Transferred to Invalid Torps, Sept , 1863. 

Albert M. Perkins, of Exeter. 

Transferred to Campany D. 

Greorg'e E. Sides, of Portsmouth. 
Slightly wounded at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863. Mustered out Tune 21, 1864. 

James I. Locke, of Portsmouth. 

Mustered out Deo. 19, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — J. S. Godfrey, of Hampton Falls. 
Appointed Quartermaster, June 4, 1861. 

Edwin R. Goodrich. 

Promoted to Commissary of Subsistence, TT. S. Vols. Sept, 1861. 

John S. Sides, of Portsmouth. 

Resigned Jan. 7, 1863. 

George E. Sides, of Portsmouth. 

Promoted to Captain, April 18, 1863. 

Charles H. Shute, of Concord. 

Transferred to Company D, April 18, 1863. 

"William H. Coleord, of Exeter. 
Wounded at Cold Harbor, June 5, 1864. Mustered out June 21, 1864. 

James I. Locke, of Portsmouth. 

Promoted to Captain, April, 1, 1865. 

Alexander Frazer, of Bow. 

Mustered out Dec. 19, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — James S. Sides, of Portsmouth. 
Promoted to First Lieut. Aug. 1, 1861. 

George E. Sides, of Portsmouth. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Aug. 1, 1862. 

Charles 1^. Patch, of Portsmouth. 
Wounded at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863. Died of wounds July 10, 1868. 

John S. McDonald, of Portsmouth. 

Mustered out June 21, 1864. 

George H. Coleman, of Piermont. 

Mustered out Dec. 19, 1865. 



116 TEE ORE AT REBELLION. 

GENERAL OILMAN MARSTON. 

Gen. Gilman Marston is a native of Orford, and the 
son of a farmer. He comes of fighting stock ; of his 
ancestors more than one took the field, during the 
early hostilities of the province,- and his grand-father, 
one of the first settlers of Orford, served with much 
credit as a captain, in the old French war. 

His hoyhood was passed upon his father's farm, 
where he formed a practical acquaintance with all the 
operations of husbandry, and a taste for agricultural 
pursuits, which has never left him. But he had a strong 
desire for a collegiate education, and with true New 
England independence, determined that he would ac- 
quire it, without imposing any burden upon his father. 
By employing his winters in school-teaching, he suc- 
ceeded in hie purpose, and graduated at Dartmouth 
College in 1837. The next year and a half he was in 
charge of an academy in Indianapolis, Ind., and then 
pursued the study of the law in the office of Judge "Wil- 
cox, in Orford, at the Dane Law School, at Cambridge, 
and finally in the office of Messrs. Hubbard and "Watts, 
in Boston. 

In 1841 Mr. Marston was admitted to the bar, and at 
once opened an office in Exeter, where he has since 
resided. Going there without acquaintance or capi- 
tal, it required no small degree of courage and reso- 
lution to strive for a position in a bar which numbered 
among its members such men as Levi Woodbury, Icha- 
bod Bartlett, James Bell and Daniel M. Christie. To 
add to the difficulties which Mr. Marston had to en- 
counter, he was soon attacked by a serious illness, which 
endangered his life, and disabled him for business, for 
a considerable time. But his resolution never failed 
him, and in spite of all discouragements, he steadily 
made his way in the confidence of the community. 



SECOND MEQIMENT. 117 

Untiring in his attention to his professional duties, and 
entering with his whole heart into the cause of his 
clients, in very little time he made himself known 
throughout his county as a lawyer of energy and ability, 
and business flowed in upon him in abundance. 

It was not long before he was called upon to make 
his appearance in political life. In 1845 he was elected 
a Representative to the State Legislature, and acquitted 
himself so much to the satisfaction of his constituents 
that he was re-elected in each of the two succeeding 
years, and in 1850 was chosen a member of the Consti- 
tutional Convention. 

In 1859 he was elected a Representative in the Con- 
gress of the United States. In accepting the office he 
relinquished a professional practice among the largest 
and most lucrative in the State, and devoted his whole 
time and energies to the duties of his position. He 
made himself familiar with every subject on which he 
was called upon to act, and did what he thought to be 
right, without regard to the consequences to himself. 
Among those who knew him best he sustained the 
character of an able, fearless and upright legislator. 

He was re-elected to Congress in 1861 ; but he had 
long foreseen the crisis which was approaching, and 
had resolved upon the course which his patriotic feel- 
ings dictated. During the trying period which occurred 
between the inauguration of President Lincoln and the 
arrival of troops, Mr. Marston was in "Washington, and 
with other loyal and gallant men, enrolled himself in 
the battalion commanded by Cassius M. Clay, for the 
protection of the President and the defense of the capi- 
tal. As soon as "Washington was rendered secure, he 
returned to New Hampshire and tendered his services 
to the Executive of the State. 

The First New Hampshire Regiment had been re- 
cruited for three months only ; and it was determined 



118 TEE QBMAT REBELLION. 

to enlist the Second for three years; and to the com- 
mand of this choice, and soon to he distinguished, body 
of men, Mr. Marston was at once appointed. He im- 
mediately entered upon the "duty of organizing it for 
the field, and on the 20th of June, 1861, he had the satis- 
faction of conducting it, with full ranks, to "Washington. 

One month later Col. Marston led his gallant command 
into the battle of Bull Run, In the hottest of the fight 
he was wounded by a musket ball, which shattered the 
bone of the right arm, near the shoulder. Retiring to 
the rear just long enough to have the fractured limb 
hastily bound up, he remounted his horse, which being 
led by an orderly, he returned at once to his regiment. 
When the retreat took place, he was conveyed to "Wash- 
ington, in a state of great exhaustion and suffering, in 
an army wagon. Here the surgeons, after consultation, 
informed the Colonel, that to save his life, his arm must 
be amputated at the shoulder. He replied that he 
would never permit it; he believed the arm could be 
saved, and he would live or die, unmutilated. His 
firmness was most fortunate, for though the climate of 
Washington was prostrating, yet when he returned to 
breathe his native air, his improvement was rapid, and 
in little more than two months he was able to rejoin his 
regiment, with the wounded arm promising to be nearly 
as serviceable as ever. The time of his convalescence 
he improved with characteristic diligence, by making 
himself familiar with military tactics, and the duties of 
his position. 

From this time till the Spring of 1863, the history of 
Col. Marston is identified with that of his regiment. 
During the whole period he was with his men, leading 
them in every engagement, and sharing their toils and^ 
hardships. In the trenches, at Torktown ; at the ex- 
treme front, under Hooker, at Williamsburg ; amid the 
miseries of Fair Oaks; during the terrific battles be- 



SECOND REGIMENT. 119 

fore Richmond; at the overwhelming repulse of the 
enemy at Malvern Hill ; in the second Bull Run cam- 
paign, where the regiment met and routed successive 
lines of the enemy with the bayonet; and at the attack 
on Fredericksburg under Burnside, Col. Marston, with 
his brave command, won unfading laurels. 

Within this period, he was again seriously wounded, 
by the accidental discharge of a pistol, in the hands of 
a lad in an adjoining tent. In the various events of 
these campaigns, Col. Marston endeared himself to his 
men by his care for their welfare and comfort, by his 
exact justice, and above all by requiring from them no 
service that he was not ready to bear his part in per- 
forming. 

During the Winter of 1862-63, while the active opera^ 
tions of the Army of the Potomac were suspended, he 
resumed his seat in Congress, where his presence was 
deemed of importance, and remained there during the 
residue of his term. 

In the Autumn of 1862 he had received the appoint- 
ment of Brigadier General, but had preferred to retain 
simply the command of his regiment, with which he 
desired to remain so long as its organization continued ; 
but in April, 1863, he was induced to accept the higher 
commission, on being placed in charge of the district 
of St. Mary's, a post of importance, embracing an ex- 
tensive camp of confederate prisoners, and being directly 
under the command of the Secretary of War. His force 
consisted of the Second, Fifth and Twelfth N^ew Hamp- 
shire regiments, a regiment of colored troops, one full 
battery of artillery, and two companies of United States 
cavalry, .to which were added two or more gunboats. 
The prisoners confined at Point Lookout, at which 
Gen. Marston's head-quarters were established, num- 
bered at times as many as ten thousand. 

The duty of guarding a j)ost so near the enemy's 



120 THE QBE AT REBELLION. 

linep, and holding out so strong inducements for an 
attack, was an arduous and responsible one, and after 
an experience of nearly a year. Gen. Marston was not 
reluctant to exchange it for a command in the field. 

In April, 1864, he was assigned to the Eighteenth 
Corps, then in the Army of the James; his brigade 
consisting of the 81st, 92d, 96th and 139th New York 
regiments. Early in May they were placed by an un- 
expected movement up the James, at Bermuda Hun- 
dred. In the affair at Kingsland Creek which soon 
followed. Gen. Marston's command were sharply en- 
gaged ; and subsequently he participated in the attack 
at Drury's Bluff, having the command of his brigade in 
conjunction with some other troops. 

The Eighteenth Corps, after retiring from Drury's 
Bluff, were ordered to Cold Harbor, where Gen. Marston 
with his command bore their full share in the series of 
struggles to dislodge the enemy from their almost im- 
pregnable position. In one attack, the General's brig- 
ade lost in killed and wounded, within the space of half 
an hour, no less than five hundred men. 

Gen. Grant having resolved on a flanking movement 
sent forward the Eighteenth Corps by water, and on 
their arrival before Petersburg they carried the enemy's 
works in front by assault, in which Gen. Marston with 
his command took part. 

He was soon afterwards placed by Gen. Grant in 
charge of a considerable force stationed at various 
points along the James, — a position requiring great 
vigilance and discretion ; and remained their until the 
following October, when he was assigned to the com- 
mand of a division, in the forces under Gen. Butler. 
Here Gen. Marston was attacked with chills and fever, 
the result of long continued exposure during some 
movements in the swampy region near Eichmond, and 
was obliged to quit the army on sick leave. 



SECOND BEQIMENT. 121 

On his arrival in "Washington he received intelligence 
that he had again been tendered the nomination for 
Congress, and at the following March election he was 
chosen for his third term. Upon the fall of Eichmond 
and the (Jessation of hostilities, a month after, he re- 
signed' his commission in the army. 

Gen. Marston served through his congressional term, 
with his accustomed fidelity, and then returned home 
to Exeter, where he now resides, engaged in the active 
practice of his profession. 

GENERAL J. N. PATTERSON. 

Gen. Patterson was born at Hopkinton, January 2d, 
1835. He fitted for college at New Hampton, entered 
Dartmouth College in 1856, and graduated in 1860 — 
paying his own way by teaching school winters. He 
was about to commence the study of a profession when 
the war broke out. Feeling that he had a duty to bis 
country to perform, he enlisted as a private on the 22d 
of April, 1861, was appointed a recruiting officer, 
opened an office at Contoocookville, enlisted a company 
of seventy-two men, for three months' service, and took 
them to Portsmouth on the 27th of May, where most 
of the men re-enlisted for three years. He was com- 
missioned First Lieutenant of Company H, on the 4th 
of June, and promoted to Captain of the same Company 
on the 23d of May, 1862. He served continually with 
his regiment through the seven days' fight before Rich- 
mond, and was never absent from his command on a 
march, in a skirmish or battle during the four and a 
half years that his regiment served. He was in twenty- 
four engagements, battles and skirmishes, from the first 
Bull Run to the taking of Richmond, April 3d, 1865. 

After the battle of Gettysburg the Second Regiment 
was sent to Point Lookout, Md., where it remained un- 



122 THE QBE AT REBELLION. 

til April, 1864, guarding the depot of rebel prisoners. 
Capt. Patterson was appointed Provost Marshal for the 
district of St. Mary's, and placed in charge of all the 
prisoners, by Gen. Marston. He was appointed acting 
Major of the regiment on its arrival at Yorktown — 
Major Sayles being absent, wounded. After the battle 
of Drury's Bluff the regiment went to Cold Harbor 
with the Eighteenth Army Corps, and was engaged in 
that battle. The three years for which the men en- 
listed had now expired, and those who did not re-enlist, 
with all the commissioned officers, returned to New 
Hampshire to be discharged. Patterson remained in 
' charge of the veterans and recruits, about three hun- 
dred in all. 

On the recommendation of Gen. Gilman Marston, 
commanding the Brigade, and Major Gen. "W". F. Smith, 
commanding the Eighteenth Corps, Capt. Patterson was 
appointed Lieut. Colonel, June 21st, 1864. He was 
commissioned Colonel of the Second Regiment Jan. 
10th, 1865, but there not being the requisite number 
of men he could not be mustered until June, 1865, 
when about three hundred men from the Tenth, Twelfth 
and Thirteenth Regiments were joined with those of 
the Second, making it up to one thousand strong. At 
this time many regiments were mustered out, and the 
three brigades in the Second Division were consoli- 
dated into two, and one of them placed in command of 
Col. Patterson, by order of Gen. Devens, commanding 
the Division. 

On the 10th of July, 1865, the Second Regiment was 
ordered to Fredericksburg, Va., and Col. Patterson was 
assigned to the command of the sub-district of the 
Northern Neck, with headquarters at Warsaw. Here 
he remained until December, when he was ordered 
with his regiment to City Point, to be mustered out of 
the service. In September, 1864, he was temporarily 



SECOND REQIMENT. 123 

in command of tte Third Brigade, Second Division, 
Eighteentli Army Corps, and commanded it in the 
action of Williamsburg Road, Oct. 27, 1864. Col. Pat- 
terson was appointed Brevet Brig. General, to date 
from March 13, 1865, for " bravery in battle and good 
conduct throughout the war," and most worthily was 
the rank bestowed. 

Gen. Patterson was mustered out with the Second 
Regiment, Dec. 19, 1865, having served four and a half 
years; returned to New Hampshire; settled at Con- 
cord; married Miss Sarah C, daughter of Rev. Dr. IST. 
Bouton, of that city, in March, 1867, by^whom he has 
one son ; was appointed United States Marshal for the 
District of l^ew Hampshire, which office he now holds, 
and discharges his duties, as he did all in the army, 
most creditably. 

COLONEL BDWAKD L. BAILEY. 

Col. Bailey, of Manchester, was commissioned Cap- 
tain of Co. I, Second Regiment, June 4, 1861, which 
position he filled to the acceptance of men under and 
officers over him, until the 26th of July, 1862, when he 
was promoted to Major. On the 23d of October of the 
same year he was promoted to Lieut. Colonel, and on 
the 18th of April, 1863, to Colonel of the Regiment. 
He was slightly wounded at the battle of Gettysburg, 
July 2, 1863. He returned to New Hampshire with the 
Regiment at the expiration of its term of enlistment, 
and was mustered out of service June 29, 1864, Col. 
Bailey was in command of the Regiment during the 
battle of Gettysburg, and Brigadier General Graham, 
under whose eye it fought, conferred a well merited 
compliment upon its commander for the cool, gallant 
and efficient manner in which he handled and fought 
his regiment on that most trying occasion. 



124 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

MISS HARRIET P. DAME. 

Wo history of the Second l^ew Hampshire Eegiment 
would he complete without it contained more than a 
passing notice of Miss Harriet P. Dame, of Concord. 
She offered her services hefore the regiment left the 
State, and though not quite ready to go to "Washing- 
ton when they did, she soon joined them there, and 
was ever afterwards regarded as one of its most brave, 
patriotic, honored and beloved members. A lady writes 
the author asking that Miss Dame may be suitably men- 
tioned here, and says : " She stepped forth, moved with 
a great purpose, and offered her life for her country. 
Such true heroism is unparalleled and unprecedented 
in the history of any country. She was more than the 
'Florence Nightingale of America,' because she had 
not the secure protection of hospital, but stood with 
our soldiers beneath the rain and fire of bullets, un- 
daunted. She knew no fear, and thought not for a 
moment of her personal safety, for God had called her, 
and she felt that His divine protection was over all." 

Words are too poor and a few pages too circumscribed 
to do her anything like justice. Her good deeds are en- 
shrined in the memory and hearts of thousands who, but 
for her timely and tender care, would be numbered with 
other thousands who, for want of it, died upon the field 
of battle from wounds, and in hospital from disease in- 
cident to the exposures and hardships of war. 

Rev. J. "W. Adams, Chaplain of the Second from De- 
cember, 1863, furnishes the following beautiful tribute 
to Miss Dame : 

My personal acquaintance with Miss Dame com- 
menced in the winter of 1863, when I received my 
commission, and joined the renowned " Old Second," 
at Point Lookout, Md. Even then her praise was in all 
the E'ew England Kegiments. Many who had un^x- 



SECOND BEOIMENT. 125 

pectedly recovered from sickness and wounds, had 
arisen from the sufferer's cot to call her blessed. 

The . exploits of heroic men were not related with 
more enthusiasm, nor with half the satisfaction with 
which her deeds of sympathy were rehearsed. Her 
name could hardly be mentioned in a New Hampshire 
regiment without calling forth the response, " I owe 
my life to Miss Dame." Though nominally connected 
with my regiment, our boys were not permitted the 
entire monopoly of her fame. All the Granite State 
regiments in the armies of the Potomac and James 
spoke her name and referred to her acts with equal 
pride. I have heard them tell how she toiled day after 
day on the bloody field of Gettysburg, sometimes, dur- 
ing the battle, between the lines, and once a prisoner 
in the hands of the enemy, still absorbed and self-for- 
getful, devoting herself to the relief of our wounded 
men. And when the darkness of night, and the ex- 
haustion of her energies made rest imperative, she 
would pillow her head upon the gory field, and sleep 
amid the dead and wounded scattered around her. 

During the winter of 1863 she had charge of the New 
Hampshire Soldiers' Relief Rooms in Washington, from 
which she frequently went forth on tours of inspection, 
that she might the more judiciously distribute the sub- 
stantial aid and comfort directed to this channel, from 
the good people at home. 

When the Army of the James was organized for the 
campaign of 1864, she arranged to leave her charge in 
Washington, and follow its destinies. She was a better 
general than McClellan, for she always managed to have 
a good stock of supplies, and was ready to move at a 
moment's notice. She also had the rare faculty of ar- 
ranging the forces under her charge, and of leading off 
in the execution of her own plans. She was an inces- 
sant worker herself and kept every body around her at 



126 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

work. If she were to frame a ritual, she would be quite 
sure to have in it something like tnis : " From empty 
titles and hollow pretensions, — Good Lord deliver us. 
From kid-gloved nurses who stand by the bedside of 
human suffering, merely simpering, my good fellow I 
pity you, — Good Lord deliver us." 

During the sanguinary conflict at Cold Harbor, she 
established herself at "White House, rendering great ser- 
vice to our soldiers, who suffered severely. It was here 
that Capt. Smith died, and here too, a few days after the 
original volunteers of the Second embarked for home to 
be mustered out, leaving the re-enlisted veterans and 
recruits to add new luster to the fame already achieved 
by this noble regiment. Miss Dame remained with us, 
caring for our sick and wounded, until we all swung 
around in front of Petersburg. 

In the Eighteenth Army Corps field hospital, at 
Broadway Landing, she could be seen to advantage — 
one moment distributing garments, comfort-bags, cor- 
dials, &c., from her private tent, at another moving 
under the large cooking tent, surrounded with delicate 
and substantial articles of diet, and the large kettles 
steaming with wholesome and palatable food in a state 
of preparation. This tent was her throne ; but she did 
not sit upon it. From this place she issued her orders, 
dispatched her messengers, and distributed luxuries to 
thousands. Here she not only ruled with system, but 
with sleeves rolled up, toiled harder than any of her 
assistants. 

In visiting my sick men in the hospital, and in pro- 
curing such articles of comfort as were necessary to 
keep the partially indisposed from following them, I 
had occasion to call on Miss Dame quite frequently. 
Her first inquiries would generally be — '^Well Chap- 
lain, how are the boys at the front? Are any of them 
sick ? When are they going to get their pay ? Is there 



SECOND REGIMENT. 127 

anything I can send tliem that will do them good ?" 
Many a can of condensed milk, beef tea, preserved 
fruit, with Jamaica ginger, blackberry syrup, farina, 
corn starch, and under garments for those who had 
none to change, stockings, mittens &c., &c., have I re- 
ceived from her to distribute among the feeble ones 
who did not wish to leave the front, and who had not 
seen the paymaster for six or eight months. She un- 
derstood the importance of having the soldier keep up 
his correspondence with home ; and the destitute never 
lacked for a postage stamp to forward his missive, if she 
could supply it. 

After having compassed the rebel capital on all sides 
during her three years of active service on the field, and 
in the hospital, it was her privilege to join our regiment 
soon after it entered the city of Richmond. And right 
well she enjoyed it, for a more patriotic heart than 
her's never beat. But even now, and here, her minis- 
trations were needed, and were cheerfully offered. 
"When the excitement of war had passed away and no 
longer quickened the pulse or braced the nerve, many 
of our men found themselves victims of chronic diseases 
and broken-down constitutions. Many a soldier who 
had for three years looked wistfully toward home, and 
now confidently expected to reach it in a few weeks, or 
months at most, must lie down upon the bed of sick- 
ness, and turn his face the other way to follow the beck 
of Death, who was still busily engaged in opening graves 
in the distant South. From her headquarters at our 
regiment, she visited our own men, and those of other 
regiments, cheering the sick and desponding by her 
presence, and alleviating distress by skillful nursing, 
and substantial benefactions. 

On the 10th of July, 1865, our regiment was sent by cars 
to Fredericksburg. Miss Dame accompanied us. Ow- 
ng to the destruction of the track, we were left as night 



128 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

came on, two miles below tte city. The sick men occu- 
pied one freight car, Surgeon Stone and myself another, 
and Miss Dame, among piles of baggage, made her home 
in the third. But she seemed to think she was highly 
favored to have a rude freight car so much to herself, 
and was only anxious to make the sick ones as comfort- 
able as possible. One man she sent to the nearest farm- 
house for milk and other things that were needed, and 
others in other directions, so that the hospital was soon 
in tolerable running order. From Fredericksburg she 
went to "Washington ; and soon returned with fresh sup- 
plies, to resume her duties. On the 27th of July, after 
the headquarters of the regiment had been moved to 
"Warsaw Court House, she took the steamer for that 
place, where in a few weeks she finished the prosecution 
of her mission in person. 

The question is sometimes asked, ""Was there not 
something indelicate in such familiar association with 
society composed entirely of men? And did she not 
subject herself to insult from the rude soldiery? " It is 
wholly gratuitous to say that the . military authorities 
would have shielded her. She had no need of this. 
Her devoted spirit, discreet bearing, and holy mission, 
were all the protection she needed. A mother could 
be no safer with her children, nor a sister safer with her 
brothers, than was Miss Dame among the New Hamp- 
shire soldiers. If we may suppose that one could be 
so thoughtless, as by word or deed to offend, a single 
word from her would have put every sword and bayo- 
net of the command between her and the offender ; and 
diminish his chances of life, by as many times as there 
were men in the command. 

Two or three times during the war, her tent, with 
most of her personal effects, was destroyed by fire, by 
which, and in other ways, she sustained a loss of hund- 
reds of dollars. 



SECOND REGIMENT. 129 

Of hardships, dangers, and losses, she never com- 
plained. But she was always ready to complain far the 
needy, and of those who were recreant, as the agents of 
other's charities. 

The State has given but a faint expression of its obli- 
gations to this most practical and efficient of all its he- 
roic female representatives in the War of the Rebellion, 
She deserves a monument, but does not need' one. Her 
noble deeds are engraved upon the memories of 
thousands, whose children and children's children will 
rehearse them as among the most beautiful that adorn 
the annals of our military history. 

The Second Regiment left Portsmouth by cars on 
the morning of the 20th of June, 1861, and arrived in 
Boston about twelve o'clock, where they were received 
at the Eastern Railroad station by an association of the 
Sons of Ifew Hampshire, to the number of about four- 
teen hundred, headed by the Boston Cadets, and accom- 
panied by Gilmore's Band, all under the marshalship of 
Col. O. A. Brewster, formerly of Hanover. The pro- 
cession marched through Blackstone, Commercial, State, 
Court, Tremont and Winter streets to Music Hall, where 
a sumptuous collation was spread. The streets all along 
the route were crowded with spectators, who cheered 
the troops at everj' step. Haymarket Square was a 
literal sea of heads. 

Music Hall was very appropriately and tastefully dec- 
orated. The galleries were occupied by the Sons of 
IsTew Hampshire and the floor by the troops, and every 
seat in the hall was filled. Vociferous cheers were 
given as the different parties, Grovernor Berry and 
suite, and Ex-Governor Goodwin of New Hampshire, 
Governor Andrew, of Massachusetts, the Cadets, and 
the soldiers, arrived in the hall. The Marshal called 
the company to order, and after a blessing was invoked 



130 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

by Eev. Dr. Quint, then of Jamaica Plains, tlie eating 
commenced, at the conclusion of which Hon. Marshall 
P. Wilder, a native of Rindge, was introduced as the 
representative of the Sons of iN'ew Hampshire. He 
bade the regiment a hearty, welcome. He reminded 
them of the revolutionary renown of their State, and of 
their patriotic Governor, John Langdon, who pledged 
his last cent for the good of the country. He said that 
war was a terrible crime ; but that an attack upon the 
integrity of the Union more than justified it. The Stars 
and Stripes miist be respected south as well as north of 
Mason and Dixon's line, and concluded by eloquently 
reminding Col. Marston of the importance of his trust. 

Col. Marston responded, and said in substance that 
he could not find words to express his emotions of grat- 
itude at the cordiality of the reception tendered his regi- 
ment. The scenes of this day will nerve our hearts to 
do all that man can do for the honor of New Hampshire, 
God bless her. "We have not left our happy and peace- 
ful homes for a war of conquest or oppression of any- 
body. "We have taken up arm^ to preserve the freest 
and best government against the most causeless rebel- 
lion ever conceived. And we will do it ! "When this 
war commenced, some doubt was expressed whether 
the people of the free states, having always been en- 
gaged in the pursuits of peace, would be able to defend 
the Union ; but the uprising of the whole North had 
settled that point. Massachusetts had been the first in 
the contest, as she was in the revolution. Many a tear- 
ful eye witnessed the march of the gallant Sixth of this 
State, in "Washington, through Pennsylvania Avenue, 
hungry and fatigued, after the scenes in Baltimore, but 
as gallant and unsubdued a set of men as ever upheld 
the honor of any country. He said the Second New 
Hampshire Eegiment was not composed of military 



SECOND BEQIMENT. 131 

men, but civilians, yet, if they were given work to do, 
he would answer for them, in the language of Colonel 
Miller, ""We'll try, sir." Col. Marston was frequently 
interrupted during his remarks by the most enthusiastic 
cheers. 

The regiment left Music Hall about half-past two, and 
marched to the Parade Ground upon the Common, 
where they were reviewed by Gov. Andrew and Staff, 
Gov. Berry, and Ex-G-ov. Goodwin. The marching was 
admirable, better than that of any regiment that had 
left Boston for the seat of war, and was loudly ap- 
plauded. 

The review concluded, the regiment marched to the 
Fall River Railroad station, where they embarked on 
board the cars for New York. The train consisted of 
twenty-two cars, drawn by two heavy locomotives. At 
Fall River the regiment was transferred from cars to 
steamboats, and arrived at New York about eleven 
o'clock, A. M., on the 21st. They were warmly wel- 
comed by the Sons of New Hampshire in that city, each 
of whom wore an appropriate badge. H. B. Perkins 
delivered an eloquent welcoming speech, as follows : 

Sons op New Hampshire : — A few weeks since the 
Sons of New Hampshire resident in this city, received 
with distinguished honors, the First New Hampshire 
Regiment, and to-day they are proud to recognize you 
as the worthy recipients of a like demonstration. In 
the name then, and in behalf of the Sons of New Hamp- 
shire, and of great and loyal New York, we bid you a 
most cordial welcome. It has been very truly said, 
that there have been men of a spirit so noble that, 
in serving their country, they had in view no motives 
of a selfish character, beyond, indeed, the satisfaction 
of having done so ; and the time is not far distant, 
when all right thinking men will gladly recognize the 



132 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

brave soldiers who are now so heroically defending the 
honor of our country's flag, as belonging to their class 
of men ; and when the Davises and the Beauregards of 
the South, shall be remembered as otily they may be, 
whose names are written but in sand, and when the 
braves of the Crimea and the heroes of the Indies shall 
live only in brass and marble, the names of Scott, of 
Ellsworth, and of Butler, will be inscribed on our broad 
prairies — ^will be murmured in every brook — will be 
mirrored in every lake — and will be written in every 
valley and on every mountain peak, throughout the 
length and breath of our land. 

Soldiers, yours is not an ^venging, a devastating mis- 
sion. You go forth to build up and to maintain our 
beloved Union — to preserve our nationality, and to save 
a bold, a reckless, and now a wretched, a piratical and 
rebellious people from a fate worse, I may almost say, 
than that of the fabled Ixion, who, for the murder of 
his own sister, was doomed to be perpetually spun upon 
a wheel, amid hissing serpents, and the burning lava- 
tide of hell. 

Soldiers of ]!Tew Hampshire ! "We, who were born 
and nurtured amid the same granite hills to which you 
have just bidden adieu — we whose kindred and friends 
are pillowed on her rocky bosom — ^we are proud of you 
to-day, and feel that the spirit of Stark and Langdon 
still lives and animates your bosoms. Onward ! on- 
ward ! then, shall be our motto, as we know it is yours ; 
onward, until the demon of treason and disunion is 
crushed from our land (cheers), and Yankee Doodle 
and the Star Spangled Banner shall again thrill the 
hearts of a patriotic, a united, an invincible people. 
(Cheers.) 

Charles Soule followed Mr. Perkins in a brief but 
eloquent speech, and presented an elegant silk flag — 



SECOND BEaiMENT. 133 

the same under whicji the regiment fought many of its 
hardest battles. It is now deposited in the rotunda of 
the State House, Concord, riddled with rebel bullets 
and missiles so that it would be diflBcult to recognize 
it as the same beautiful ensign which they received 
from the hands of their friends in New York. If it is 
tarnished by the fire and smoke of battle, and its folds 
torn by the shot and shell of the foes of the country, it 
never suffered dishonor. The speaker reminded the 
troops of the axiom that a consciousness of right always 
engenders strength, and asked them to see to it that 
every traitor at the South shall meet with a traitor's 
doom. 

The following is a report, published in a l!Tew York 
paper at the time, of Col. Marston's reply : 

The Colonel, Gilman Marston, listened to the ad- 
dresses on horseback, and with uncovered head. His 
horse had stood meanwhile with little or no manifesta- 
tion of uneasiness, but when his rider's voice was 
raised in response, the animal curvetted about consid- 
erably ; the Colonel, , nevertheless, spoke easily, and 
with as much dignity as his peculiar position at the 
time permitted, pausing for a moment and reining up 
his horse in front of the committeemen, as often as the 
impatient steed carried him beyond the formal position 
he had at first taken. During the delivery of his reply, 
he said that in behalf of the regiment and himself, 
he presented their united and grateful thanks for the 
kind welcome they had been given, and the gift of so 
beautiful a flag. The stars and stripes had always been 
a type of our Union, to uphold which they had left the 
comforts of home to undergo the deprivations and trials 
of war ; but he hoped that, by the blessing of God, the 
Union would be maintained for transmission to other 
g^enerations. He accepted the flag for the regiment, 



134 THE aSEAT REBELLION. 

and pledged for them their devotion to it, and their 
determination to uphold it with all their strength. 

The flag was then carried to the line, the Sons of 
New Hampshire formed into sections at the head of 
the regiment, whose band struck up a national air, 
when the regimental line broke into platoons, and the 
whole column moved up Broadway amid the applause 
and cheers of the thousands of spectators who crowded 
the streets and admired the stalwart appearance and 
soldierly bearing of the men. ' The officers dined with 
the committee of arrangements, at the Everett House, 
and the men were entertained at the Arsenal. In the 
afternoon the regiment departed for "Washington, by 
cars, arrived there about noon on the 23d, and went into 
camp at Colorama Hill, about a mile north of the city. 

While passing through N^ew Jersey, Lieut. Charles 
"W". "Walker, of Co. B, fell from the cars and was so 
badly injured that he soon died. His remains were 
sent back to Concord where his funeral was attended 
by members of the Legislature and a large concourse 
of citizens. 

The Second was brigaded with the First and Second 
Rhode Island and Seventy-first lifew York — all excellent 
regiments. Attached to the brigade was the Second 
Rhode Island Battery, and the Seventy-first New York 
had two Dahlgren howitzers, manned by two of its com- 
panies. Col. Ambrose E. Burnside, of the Second Rhode 
Island, was in command of the brigade. 

THE BATTLE OF BULL RUN. 

On the 16th of July the regiment started on its first 
campaign, with fiill ranks. Men who for weeks had 
been on the 'sick-list, now reported themselves for duty, 
lest they should be left behind in what they fondly be- 
lieved would be the death blow of the rebellion. It was 



SECOND REGIMENT. 135 

a very hot day, and many of tlie men, overcome witli 
heat, fell out by the way. The brigade bivouacked for 
the night at Bailey's Cross Eoads. The next day, late 
in the afternoon, they entered Fairfax Court House with 
banners flying and bands playing, and the brigade 
stacked their arms on the village green, while the colors 
of the Second were displayed from the cupola of the 
court house. Among the captures made here was a 
rebel mail, containing on paper many evidences of 
Southern prowess. The march was resumed early on 
the morning of the 18th. In the afternoon the roar of 
cannon and musketry was heard, and several wounded 
naen coming back created the most intense excitement, 
by their reports, among the troops at the rear. The 
Second went into camp near Centerville, the spirits of 
the men being at fever heat, where they remained until 
one o'clock on the morning of the 21st, when they again 
moved forward. At daylight they were leading Hunter's 
Division on the way to Bull Eun. At half-past nine 
o'clock the enemy was discovered in strong force ahead. 
Half a mile further on the Rhode Island regiment filed 
into the fields pn the left, while the Second kept on up 
the road. They "had just entered the shade of a wood 
when a cannon ball came screaming and crashing 
through the trees overhead, followed immediately by 
others, and fierce volleys of musketry. The excitement 
was now imbounded; all superfluous baggage was 
thrown off, and a rapid movement launched the regi- 
ment from the woods upon the battle field of Bull Run, 
and it engaged in the fight. Col. Marston was wounded 
in the shoulder by a rifle ball, and was carried to the- 
rear. His wound was hastily bound up, he returned 
to the field to lead his men, and was received by them 
with tumultuous applause. 

The fighting was of the most desperate character. 
Regiments charged the enemy gallantly and with broken 



136 TEE QBE AT REBELLION. 

ranks came back to the rear to re-form and again advance. 
The battle continued until early in the afternoon, when 
the firing almost ceased, and Gen. McDowell rode down 
the line and informed the soldiers that a great victory 
had been won, which drew forth much cheering. The 
troops were in a very disorganized condition. Many 
regiments could not muster half their numbers, while 
the reserves were miles away. Rebel re-enforcements 
were brought by railroad and put into the field, to wrest 
from the Union ariny its dearly bought triumph. At the 
same time an unaccountable panic seized our troops, and 
while the frightened rebels were making rapid progress 
towards Manassas, many of the Union army were flying 
towards "Washington. The Second formed upon the field 
in good order to meet the fresh troops of the enemy, and 
it was sent to the front to take the place of other regi- 
ments which were falling back in a disorganized condi- 
tion. It filed down into the valley where it was exposed 
to a murderous fire, the men falling at every step. A 
halt was made behind a ridge for the purpose of re-form- 
ing the ranks, when it again advanced on its way up the 
hill, and came into position facing a rebel battery, posted 
by the ruins of some log houses, behind which a body of 
rebels kept up an incessant fire on the regiment, which 
soon caused it to fall back. At this time regiment after 
regiment of Johnston's men came from the woods, and 
moving in solid columns against the broken regiments 
of the Union army, swept triumphantly on, the whole 
force opposing them joining in the retreat that closed the 
first disaster on the first great battle field of the war. 

The Second, with the rest of the brigade, continued the 
retreat until Washington was reached. After several 
days the loss of the regiment was reportq^ to be sevr 
killed, fifty-six wounded and forty-six prisoners. Of the 
latter many were supposed to have died upon the field, 
and of those reported killed two returned after a long 



SECOND REGIMENT. 137 

confinement in rebel prisons. Capt. Hiram Rollins was 
severely wounded in the shoulder, in consequence of 
which he resigned Oct. 14, 1862. 

Early in August the Second moved to Bladensburg, 
Md., about four miles from "Washington, and with the 
First and Eleventh Massachusetts and Twenty-sixth Penn- 
sylvania, formed a brigade under the command of Gen. 
Joseph Hooker. Here they remained about two months, 
drilling and learning the duties of military life. About 
the middle of October, Hooker's brigade was ordered to 
the lower Potomac, where the rebels had established a 
blockade of the river. Sickle's Excelsior brigade ar- 
rived, and vsdth Hooker's formed a division, of which 
Gen. Hooker assumed command, leaving his brigade in 
command of Col. Cowdin, of the First Massachusetts 
regiment, and the division marched to Budd's Ferry, over 
the roughest of roads. They went into winter quarters, 
and passed the next few months in building corduroy 
roads, erecting comfortable winter quarters, and such 
amusements as camp life afforded. Early in the winter 
Gen. Patterson arrived with the Second New Jersey 
brigade. About the middle of February Gen. Waglee 
of Pennsylvania, an accomplished officer, was assigned 
to the command of the First Brigade. By reason of his 
■ strict discipline he very soon became unpopular with the 
men, who looked upon him as a tryant. He thought the 
guard house of the Second Regiment was altogether too 
comfortable quarters for prisoners confined there, and 
ordered Col. Marston to build a dungeon, without so 
much as a crack or an opening anywhere, so that it 
should be perfectly dark. The dungeon was built, and 
one day Gen. l^aglee went over to inspect it, accom- 
panied by the Colonel. " Where is the entrance," said 
the General, " and how do you get anybody into it ? " 
" O ! " said CoL Marston, " that is not my lookout. I 
obeyed orders to the letter! How do you like it?" 



138 THE QBE AT REBELLION. 

The General made no reply. The dungeon stood just 
as it was built until after the regiment left in the spring 
for the Peninsula. 

On the 6th of April, 1862, the division broke camp, 
embarked on board, of steamers for the Peninsula, 
and joined in the siege of Yorktown. About this time 
Q-en. Naglee went to another division, and his place was 
supplied by Gen. Cuvier Grover, whom all soon learned 
to respect and love. This was a period of hard work, 
erecting fortifications, digging parallels and constructing 
corduroy roads and bridges. The parallels which "Wash- 
ington had built still existed, and mementoes of the rev- 
olutionary struggle were daily dug out of the soil, such 
as bullets, balls and bleaching bones. The site of Corn- 
wallis' surrender, marked by a granite stone, was not 
accessible then, but was visited by thousands after the 
surrender of Yorktown. 

Early on the morning of the 4th of May, Yorktown 
was abandoned by the enemy, and in an hour after the 
evacuation was known Hooker's division was marching 
in pursuit of them. So sudden was the movement that 
the men had to leave without rations, and were almost 
without food for two days. They marched straight 
through the deserted town, having first carefully re- 
moved or marked the position of the torpedoes with 
which the ground was thickly planted, and which had 
already in some instances exploded and frightfully man- 
gled the soldiers who stepped upon them. Late in the 
afternoon a few wounded cavalrymen, coming to the 
rear, announced that the rebels were a little distance 
ahead, in line of battle, on the "Williamsburg road. The 
division, after a short halt to load their guns, toiled 
on into the darkness, over stumps and through 
swamps, until midnight, when the men threw them- 
selves upon the ground to get a little rest for the com- 
ing contest. 



SECOND REGIMENT. 139 

THE BATTLE OF WILLIAMSBURG, 

At an early hour, on the morning of flie 5th of May, 
amid a cold, drizzling rain, the march was resumed, the 
men picking their way along the muddy road as best 
they could. Two miles brought them to the enemy's 
pickets, who greeted them with a few shots, and dispo- 
sitions were at once made for a fight. Company B, with 
Sharp's rifles, deployed forward as slarmishers, while 
the brigade formed in line of battle, with two regiments 
on each side of the road. The skirmishers commenced 
an advance, followed by the line, engaging the ene- 
my's skirmishers, struggling through a heavy abattis, 
until the edge of the slashing was reached, when they 
took cover behind the fallen trees and stumps. In front 
was a broad undulating plain, and the spires of ViU- 
iamsburg were seen in the distance. Between was a 
Mne of small redoubts, the largest called Fort Magruder, 
and mounted with guns commanding the road. There 
was also a line of rifle pits from each of which came a 
fire so well directed that several of our men, though 
well covered, were hit. For three hours_ things remained 
in this position, our troops looking for re-enforcements. 
At last a regular battery came up the road and took 
position in front of the line. The rebel guns at once 
opened upon the battery, and the gunners fied without 
firing a shot, amid the curses of the whole brigade, from 
which a company of volunteer artillerists was organized, 
under direction of the officers of the battery, and worked 
the guns so efiectively that Fort Magruder was soon 
silenced. At this point a heavy force of rebels made an 
advance against the left of the line, which had been 
strengthened by the arrival of the rest of the division, 
and the battle commenced in earnest. The troops on 
the left fought bravely, but being unsupported gave 
way, which rendered the position of the right untenable, 



140 TEE QBE AT REBELLION. 

and Grover's brigade fell back to the edge of the woods. 
In the woods a skirmish line was formed and a fierce 
bushfight ensued, with varied results, for several hours. 
During this fight Capt. Leonard Drown, of Company E, 
a brave and noble officer, was killed. Lieut. David 
Steele, of Company G, with a few men of his company, 
encountered a squad of rebels of twice his own number. 
He dashed in among them, swinging his sword, and 
shouted at the top of his voice : " Surrender, you d — d 
scoundrels, or I will blow your brains out ! " They at 
once threw down their arms and were made prisoners. 

The guns at Fort Magruder, being relieved from the 
fire of our batteries, opened again, and were replied to 
by three ^Napoleon guns on our side, which poured a 
constant fire of grape and canister into the rebel ranks. 
Heintzelman, Hooker, and Grover were everywhere 
encouraging the men. The division held its ground 
until nearly dark, when Kearney arrived with his di- 
vision, the tide of battle was quickly turned, and the rebels 
were driven from the field in confusion. The loss on 
the Union side, in this battle, was put down at fifteen 
hundred and seventy-five. The Second, from its position 
and manner of fighting, suffered less than those regi- 
ments which, in dense line of battle, were more exposed 
to the enemy's fire. Its loss was reported as eighteen 
killed, sixty-six wounded, and twenty-three missing. 
Capt. Evarts W. Earr lost his right arm, Lieut. Samuel 
O. Burnham was severly" wounded, and Capt. Edward 
L. Bailey suffered an ugly contusion. 

On the 6th the Second buried their dead and marked 
the graves the best they could, and cared for the 
wounded. The brigade moved near the town, and Gen. 
Grover was appointed military governor. They per- 
formed provost duty there for some time while the rest of 
the army moved up the Peninsula. The public build- 
ings were filled with wounded rebels, who were well 



SECOND REGIMENT. 141 

attended and cared for by the secessionists of the place. 
The brigade was finally relieved by a detachment of 
cavalry, and in its turn proceeded up the Peninsula, and 
joined the main body at Bottom Bridge, where the 
troops were waiting the order to advance. A day or 
two afterwards they moved to Poplar Hill, six. miles 
from Fair Oaks. 

THE BATTLE OF FAIR OAKS. 

The battle of Fair Oaks commenced on the last day 
of May, 1862. On the second day of the fight Gren. 
Hooker took the two other brigades of his division and 
went to the assistance of Gen. Casey in that fearful bat- 
tle. Gen. Grpver's brigade, meantime, lay in line of 
battle, with the bridges of the intervening stream torn 
up, and artillery guarding the passage, expecting an 
attack; but the defeat of the rebels by Gen. Sumner 
secured them from all danger. On the 3d of June the 
brigade marched to Fair Oaks and relieved the Excel 
sior brigade in the trenches, where they remained 
twenty-four hours under arms, wet and shivering, with- 
out fire, surrounded by the putrifying corpses of men 
slain in the recent battle ; the enemy's pickets, a few 
hundred yards in front, occasionally firing, which now 
and then increased almost to a volley, keeping the men 
continually on the alert, momentarily expecting a charge. 
When they were relieved they went into camp a short 
distance to the rear. The warm weather in a few days 
caused a horrible stench to arise, which with the hard 
labor, the miasma of the swamps and the bad water, 
soon seriously affected the health of the men. 

The Sixteenth Massachusetts Regiment joined the 
brigade about the middle of June. On the 23d five 
companies of the Second, with a portion of the Six- 
teenth Massachusetts, drove in the rebel pickets. The 



142 THE ORE AT REBELLION. 

rebels met tlie attack with a line of battle and re-^es- 
tablisbed tbeir picket line. Two days later tbe whole 
division went out, and after an obstinate fight forced 
back the rebel pickets and placed the Union, pickets in 
their line. The First Massachusetts opened the attack, 
and were foUpwed by company B, of the Second, which 
fought desperately, losing twenty-two killed and 
wounded out of forty-two taken into the fight. The 
whole regiment afterward went in and lost about 
seventy men during the day. 

On the 26th and 27th of June were fought, on the 
north side of the Chickahominy, the bloody" battles of 
Mechanicsville and Gaines' Hill, which resulted in with- 
drawing the whole army to the south side of the river, 
and was the beginning of the memorable " Seven Days' 
Fight," and the retreat to the James B,iver. 

THE SEVEN DATS' FIGHT. 

On the morning of the 28th of June Gen. Hooker's 
division was under arms and on the retreat. Every 
article that could not be carried was burned or other- 
wise destroyed. The retreat was well covered, and be- 
fore the next morning the Union forces were safely 
across White Oak Swamp, with the bridges over the 
creek destroyed. On the morning of the 29th a line of 
battle was formed, in a huge semicircle extending from 
the Swamp to Charles City Cross Roads, Hooker's di- 
vision being at the latter place with a strong picket 
thrown out toward Richmond, while the enormous 
wagon train moved on toward Harrison's Landing. 
The enemy came up and engaged the right of the line 
during the forenoon, but it was not until three o'clock 
in the afternoon that firing commenced on Hooker's 
front, when a fierce battle ensued. The Second took a 
position in rear of the Massachusetts Sixteenth, and the 



SECOND REGIMENT. 143 

battle went on till niglit, with varied fortune, when the 
Second moved further to the right, ready for an attack. 
None came, however. During the night the most hide- 
ous groans and shrieks were heard, from the wounded 
— mostly rebels — ^between the two contending lines. 
Before morning the army was again in motion toward 
Malvern Hill, and before sunrise Was in position for the 
last great battle of the retreat. The enemy soon ap- 
peared. Heintzelman's corps was posted on the left 
center, and as soon as the line was established the men 
went to work throwing up intrenchments, and the 
Second was soon sheltered behind a nearly buUet-pjoof 
wall of decayed trees and broken limbs. An attack 
was made and the battle raged furiously along the right 
of the line. Three hundred pieces of artillery, including 
heavy siege guns, and those of one or two gunboats on 
the river to the left, poured a tremendous fire into the 
lines, of the advancing rebels, and wherever they made 
desperate endeavors to break the Union lines they were 
terribly repulsed. "While the boys of the Second were 
filling the chinks in their breastworks, and making 
other preparations to meet an attack, the Surgeon said 
to Col. Marston, " Your men have got a good posi- 
tion." "Yes; my boys are great on intrenchments," 
replied the Colonel. "Do you think you will be at- 
tacked ? " " "Well, we may be ; they are at it pretty 
brisk on the right." " How many men would it take 
to drive you out of here?" "How many? Well, six 
thousand might, possibly, but five thousand would get 
killed doing it." The pluck of the boys would have 
made good the Colonel's words, had there been occa- 
sion to display it. The position of the Second was un- 
assailed, and the regiment witnessed oue of the most 
magnificent battles of jthe war. 

July 2d the army moved slowly along through rain 
and mud towards Harrison's Landing, leaving the enemy 



144 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

SO badly cut up that lie could not pursue. On the morn- 
ing of the 3d a rebel light battery came up and threw a 
few shells into the camp of the army; but it was cap- 
tured shortly after, by a force sent out for that purpose. 
Arrived at Harrison's Landing, defensive works were 
constructed in a few days that would defy the whole 
confederacy, and the troops enjoyed a season of rest. 

Gen. Hooker devised a plan for the capture of Malvern 
Hill, which was occupied by a few hundred rebels. 
This plan being approved by Gen. McClellan, on the 
4th of August the expedition set out, and by a circuitous 
route reached Charles City Cross Roads. Silence was 
enjoined upon the men, and the inhabitants had been 
put under guard that they might not carry the news to 
the rebels, and thus, without noise the division biv- 
ouacked for the night, almost within pistol shot of the 
enemy's pickets. At early dawn the movement com- 
menced, and but for the failure of Gen. Patterson to 
take possession of the Richmond road, the escape of the 
rebels would have been completely cut off. As it was, 
they all got away but about a hundred men, and Hooker's 
division occupied Malvern Hill. A large force was sent 
from Richmond to re-take it, and Hooker was re-enforced 
by the divisions of Couch and Sedgwick ; but in compli- 
ance with orders, two days afterward, the whole force 
returned to Harrison's Landing. 

On the 16th of August Harrison's Landing was evacu- 
ated. The division reached Yoi-ktown on the 21st and 
embarked on steamers for Alexandria, arriving there on 
the 23d. Thus ended the famous Peninsula Campaign, 
in which Gen. Hooker's division won an imperishable 
fame, and the New Hampshire Second, a part of it, had 
its full share of hard marches and bloody battles, mak- 
ing for itself a most noble record. 

While at Alexandria the Second received fifty volun- 
teer recruits. On the 25th of August the division was 



SECOND REQIMENT. 145 

placed on freight cars and sent to re-enforce Gen. Pope, 
and went into camp at Cedar Creek the next day. On 
the 27th the division was on its way back to Manassas 
Junction. The rebels were found in line of battle at 
Kettle Run, near Bristoe Station, who, after a short bat- 
tle, retreated toward Manassas, followed by Hooker. 
At night the division bivouacked within a mile of the 
Junction, where the light of the fires could be seen with 
which Gen. Jackson was destroying the stores he had 
captured, preparatory to evacuating the place. 

SECOND BATTLE OF BULL RUN. 

On the morning of the 28th Reno's division, of Burn- 
side's corps, came up, and after a short rest moved on to 
Manassas, which the rebels had left for Centerville. 
Hooker advanced and bivouacked for the night at 
Blackburn's Ford. On the morning of the 29th can- 
nonading was heard far away at the northwest, indicat- 
ing that Stonewall Jackson was engaging some part of 
the Union force. Hooker at once started with his di- 
vision for the scene, which he reached about noon. 
Grover's brigade was temporarily assigned to Sigel's 
command, whose position was in the center of the line. 
The scene was familiar to the men, for it was the old bat- 
tle ground of the first Bull Run, where many of them had 
received their initiation into scenes of bloody conflict. 

The brigade was massed near the village of Groveton, 
and in about two hours was ordered to charge the 
enemy in the woods. The first line of rebels lay in a 
railroad cut, and with the Second in the center of the 
line, the brigade moved forward at the order, steadily 
and noiselessly. Suddenly the rattling of thousands of 
muskets broke the stillness, and a shower of bullets 
tore through the air. Gen. Grover gave the order to 
" charge ! " and with a yell every man dashed forward. 



146 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

In a moment tKe railroad was carried, and the rebels, 
who had delivered their volley in a prostrate position, 
were taken prisoners before they had time to rise. The 
brigade dashed on for the second line, which rose and 
received them with a volley, but instantly the Second 
was in their midst, and the line broke and fled. A 
third line of rebels still remained, and the regiment 
pressed on, when the line seemed about to break, and 
the victory almost gained. The regiments on the right 
and left had not advanced so far, owing to greater ob- 
structions in the ground, and at the very moment when 
success seemed ready to crown the assault, the Second 
was greeted with a murderous volley from either flank, 
and with hardly men enough remaining to form a skirm- 
ish line, they turned and started for the railroad, barely 
escaping capture, and leaving their wounded in the 
hands of the enemy. Capt. Joshua F. Littlefleld, of 
Company B, a brave officer, was left on the field with 
several wounds, and finally died. He had received the 
appointment of Lieut. Colonel of the Eleventh Regi- 
ment, and though not obliged to do so, chose to accom- 
pany the regiment and partake in all its dangers until 
he left it for his new position. Lieut. Sylvester Rogers, 
of Company G, was wounded in the knee and back, and 
died while being carried from the field. 

Shattered and bleeding, the brigade emerged into the 
iield whence it started, and was. hastily re-formed be- 
hind a little ridge, to await the counter charge which 
was expected. It soon came, and though the enemy 
was received with a well-directed volley, and there was 
a well sustained fight for a few minutes, yet the deci- 
mated ranks could not withstand the overwhelming 
numbers poured against them, and the line fell back to 
the hill on which our batteries were posted. "With ex- 
ulting cheers the rebels followed, but one of the Union 
batteries poured in such a deadly fire of grape and 



SECOND REGIMENT. 147 

canister, that the cheers soon stopped, and the line 
melted away as if the ground had opened to swallow it. 

The remnant of the brigade was now gathered to- 
gether by the side of Bull Run Creek, and an estimate 
of losses was made. The Second entered the fight with 
three hundred and thirty-two men. Of these sixteen 
were reported killed, eighty-seven wounded, and 
twenty-nine missing. Of the latter by far the greater 
number were never heard from. Ten out of twenty- 
one commissioned officers were killed or wounded. 
Besides those mentioned above, Lieut. Norton E.. 
Moore, of Company F, was killed ; Lieut. John P. Hol- 
man, of Company H, received a terrible wound in the 
thigh ; Lieut. John D. Cooper, of Company H, was shot 
through the lungs, and Lieuts. Ballard, Roberts, Steele, 
Young and Gordon, were wounded more or less se- 
verely. That night the division slept just in the rear 
of the Union batteries, on the identical spot where the 
Second had formed its line of battle in 1861. 

On the afternoon of the 30th, the battle was renewed 
against that part of the line held by McDowell, and 
soon extended along the whole line. -Hooker's division 
was called up to repel an attack, which proved to be 
only a feint, and was then ordered to " the other hill." 
Every thing seemed to indicate that the second battle 
of Bull Run was like the first — a rebel victory. 

That night the army fell back to Centerville, in good 
order. On the 1st of September the rebels attempted 
to get possession of the road between Centerville and 
Fairfax, and the divisions of Hooker, Kearney and 
Stevens were sent to the threatened point. The battle 
of Chantilly ensued, and the rebels were driven back ; 
but Kearney and Stevens were both killed. In this bat- 
tle the Second had no more active part than to cover a 
road over which the Union trains were crowding to- 
wards Washington. 



148 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

Two days later the division arrived at Alexandria, 
and for a time formed a portion of Gen. Banks' forces 
in the defenses' of Washington, while the rest of the 
army was engaged in the movement which terminated 
so gloriously at Antietam. Gren. Hooker was assigned 
to the command of McDowell's Corps, and the command 
of the division devolved upon Gen. Sickles, Gen. 
Grover left the brigade for a more important command, 
about the same time. The loss of both Hooker and 
Grover was deeply regretted by the division. The 
camp was removed to Fairfax Seminary, and until the 
1st of November the picket and fatigue duty performed 
by the regiment was very arduous. At /this time the 
division was ordered to guard the railroad from Man- 
assas to A+exandria, and was much scattered. The 
Second was in comfortable quarters at Centerville, 
with but light duty to perform, and the time passed 
pleasantly. 

On the 18th of November the division started for Fal- 
mouth, to join the army now commanded by Gen, 
Burnside, and arrived there in ten days. Gen. Stone- 
man commanded .the corps, and a new division, under 
Gen. Whipple, had been added to it, while the corps 
was assigned to the Central Grand Division of the army 
commanded by Gen, Hooker, 

THE BATTLE OF FEEDERICKSBXTRG. 

The object of the concentration of troops at Falmouth 
was to take Fredericksburg, on the opposite side of the 
Rappahannock river. Gen. Burnside's plan of attack 
was laid before the President, Gen, Halleck and the 
Secretary of War, and approved by them. The rebels 
expected our army would cross at a diflferent point, and 
therefore this one was not as strongly guarded as it 
otherwise would have been. On the night of the 10th 



SECOND BEQIMENT. 149 

of December the work of laying pontoon bridges across 
the river was commenced and two-thirds completed, 
when daylight appeared and the rebels discovered what 
was going on. Their sharpshooters at once opened upon 
our engineer party from the houses, and the men fell 
dead as fast as they took their stand upon the boats. 
Attempts were made to dislodge the sharpshooters by 
our riflemen, but in vain. They were too well pro- 
tected. One hundred and forty pieces of our artillery 
opened from the Falmouth side of the river upon the 
part of the town from which the sharpshooting pro- 
ceeded. This had no effect, and it was evident that the 
bridges could not be completed until they were in some 
way dislodged. 

The Michigan Seventh volunteered for the hazardous 
duty of crossing the river in boats to dislodge the rebel 
sharpshooters. They were watched by thousands as 
they rowed across the river, and many of the men were 
shot. But they gained the shore, gallantly charged up 
the steep slope, drove the rebels out of the rifle pits and 
out of the buildings fronting the water. The Nine- 
teenth and Twentieth Massachusetts followed the Mich- 
igan regiment, and they together held the ground until 
the bridges were completed. While this was going on 
the rebels were concentrating their forces at Fredericks- 
burg. 

In the afternoon the division crossed the river at the 
lower bridge and lay in the streets of the town. On the 
13th, the day of the main assault, the Second, with sev- 
eral other regiments, was assigned to the duty of guard- 
ing the bridges and to keep men from crossing the river 
and shirking their duty. About midnight they were 
relieved and joined the brigade at the front, within 
range of the enemy's pickets. A battery was brought 
up and commenced shelling the brigade, when Company 
B, with its Sharp's rifles, was sent to shoot the gunners 



150 TEE QUE AT REBELLION. 

and horses. The battery, after the loss of a few men, 
retired. 

The rebels were very strongly intrenched upon the 
hights back of the town, and many abortive attempts 
were made to dislodge them. The fighting upon the 
left was furious, and during the charge made by one of 
our brigades an entire isTorth Carolina regiment was 
taken prisoners. During a furious artillery duel, in 
which the New Hampshire battery was- hotly engaged' 
and lost several men. Gen. Bayard, the youngest gen- 
eral in the service, was killed. 

At one time Gen. Meade's division made a most gal- 
lant charge, reaching the very crest of the hill. They 
drove two of Hill's brigades back upon their second line 
of defenses and captured several hundred prisoners. For 
a time it seemed as if the battle was in our favor, but a 
large body of rebel infantry came rushing down from 
their second line of defenses and bore our brave charg- 
ing lines before them. The day was lost, and thousands 
of our soldiers lay dead upon the hills. The rebel works 
were still unbroken and swarming with men. The bat- 
tle of Fredericksburg was over. During this contest 
about a dozen of the men of the Second Regiment were 
wounded, but none fatally. 

The next afternoon a council of generals was held at 
Gen. Burnside's headquarters, and after much discussion 
it was decided to retreat across the river, under the cover 
of darkness. Late on the afternoon of the 15th the order 
to re-cross the river was given, which was accomplished 
during the night, without disaster. The night was so 
dark and rainy that the movements of our army could 
not be seen, and so windy that the rumbling of our trains 
could not be heard by the enemy. 

The last of January Gen. Burnside was relieved from 
the command of the army, and Gen. Hooker put in 
his place. Grand divisions were abolished, and corps 



SECOND REOIMENT. 151 

badges were adopted; that of the Third being a diamond 
or lozenge, with red, white and blue colors for the re- 
spective divisions, in their order. 

On the 26th of February the Second Regiment was 
ordered to report to Gen. "Wool, commanding the de- 
partment of the East. At Boston the regiment was 
most heartily welcomed and feasted and toasted at Fan- 
euil Hall, ^t Manchester the men met a most warm 
and gratifying reception. They were escorted to Smyth's 
Hall, where tables were profusely spread with eatables. 
The galleries were filled with ladies and friends of the 
men in the regiment. Mayor Theodore T. Abbott wel- 
comed the regiment in a feeling and appropriate speech, 
which was responded to by Lieut. Colonel Bailey. After 
the eating had been finished Hon. Frederick Smyth was 
introduced as toast-master, when sentiments and short 
speeches, by men of the regiment and citizens, followed. 
The next day the regiment was received at Coneo:fd, by 
a grand procession, dinner at the hotels and speeches of 
welcome. G-en. Wool was there to add to the interest 
of the occasion. 

The headquarters of the regiment were established at 
Concord, while Companies D, E and K, were sent to 
Fort Constitution, Portsmouth harbor. The men were 
granted furloughs to visit their homes, many of whom 
did not return until long after their time had expired. 
The Seventeenth regiment, numbering about one hund- 
red and fifty men, was consolidated with the Second, the 
officers having been first discharged. Col. Marston was 
promoted .to Brigadier General, and Lieut. Colonel 
Bailey, Major Carr and Capt. Sayles were promoted to 
fill the vacancies consequent on this promotion. 

On the 25th of May, 1863, the regiment left the State 
for "Washington, arriving there on the 28th, where it 
remained until the 11th of June, when it i moved and 
joined the army of the Potomac at Hartwood Church, 



152 THE aBEAT BEBELLION. 

and was assigned to the Jersey Brigade, to which it was 
attached as long as it remained with the army of the 
Potomac. 

THE BATTLE OF GETTYSBTTEG. 

The brigade arrived at Emraettsburg on the first of 
July, and encamped for the night, having heard firing 
all the afternoon in the direction of Gettysburg. At 
two o'clock on the morning of the 3d, the brigade set off 
and reached the scene of action early in the forenoon, 
and joined its corps. The brigade was commanded by 
Col. Berlin. It moved up the slope into the open field, 
when a rebel battery opened upon it with shell, one piece 
hitting the color-staff of the Second Regiment, wound- 
ing several of the color-guard. The brigade was with- 
drawn to a grove, while a battery went into position and 
rapidly replied to the rebel guns, and which the brigade 
was ordered to support. On the crest of the ridge, in a 
peach orchard, was a battery of six Ifapoleon guns, 
which kept up a spirited response to the rebels who 
were pouring shell and spherical case into our lines with 
murderous effect. The Second was ordered to report to 
G-en. Graham, commanding a brigade in Gen. Birney's 
division, and by him ordered to the rear of this battery 
as a support. After the position was taken the roll of 
the Second was called, and only eight men were found 
absent from their places. The regiment was exposed to a 
more terrific artillery fire than it ever experienced before 
or since. The air was filled with the missiles of death and 
the leaves and branches of the peach trees were shorn as 
if by a tornado. The brave gunners did not flinch, 
though every discharge of the enemy's guns dealt death 
to their ranks or mowed down the ranks of the supports 
ing regiment. Some shells came along the ground so 
closely as to wound half a dozen men at a time. Others 



:'^*ft 'k. 



1' 



fV\ 



IPiiiiiii^ 




SECOND REGIMENT. 153 

exploded as they struck the cartridge-boxes, and the 
cartridges, set on fire, blew up like so many Chinese 
crackers. The conflict was going on vigorously from 
Round Top, on the left, to Cemetery Hill, on the right, 
increasing in strength and ftiry toward the point where 
the rebels were striving with every human effort to turn 
our left. Thus the battle proceeded until half-past four 
in the afternoon, when this battery was relieved by a 
regular battery of rifled guns, which was served with 
much less spirit than its predecessor. The enemy's fire 
at once, increased, their infantry beg^n to show them- 
selves from behind the Woods, and at their advance our 
skirmishers came pouring in. So threatening was the 
attack that the Lieutenant of the battery spiked his 
guns in expectation of their capture. At this point Col. 
Bailey asked permission to charge with the Second and 
check this advance, which was granted, and the men 
sprang to their feet with a loud shout, passed the bat- 
tery, and drove the advancing enemy back to their lines, 
taking up a position on the Emmettsburg road. Here 
it was exposed to the enemy's artillery at short range, 
and to the fire of the line it had just driven, which had 
taken shelter in a ravine. Two rebel regiments com- 
menced to advance by the flank across the field in front, 
but these were speedily forced to flee in confusion. A 
brigade then advanced in line opposite the Sixty-third 
Pennsylvania, which was formed on the right of the 
Second, and no fire seemed able to check them. Some 
of Company B's men, who were wounded, took a posi- 
tion behind an old farm house and poui-ed a lively fire 
into the advancing ranks, aiming especially at their 
colors. Still it came on and the Sixty-third gave way. 
The regiment on the left also faced about and retreated, 
upon which the Second was in its turn compelled to 
retire. The ground was thickly strewn with dead and 
wounded of both sides. Gen. Graham was wounded 



154 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

and taken prisoner, and Gen. Sickles, who rode up amid 
the terrific storm, had his leg shattered by a shell, and 
was carried from the field. 

The rebels gained a temporary advantage at this point 
in the line. The Third corps had been overborne by 
vastly superior numbers, when the gallant old Sixth 
Corps, out of breath and weary with a long march, but 
fresh in courage and spirit, made its appearance and 
pressed^ forward to take the place of the shattered and 
bleeding Third. The rebel force was hurled back, the 
lost ground recovered, and the sun went down on the 
second day of that gallant fight, with the rebel army 
beaten at every point, and the tide of secession through- 
out the country at its ebb. 

When the Second. Regiment rejoined its brigade it 
was but a sad remnant of what it had been a few hours 
earlier, when its roll was called, just before entering into 
the fight. Then twenly-four officers and three hundred 
and thirty men answered to their names. Of this num- 
ber nineteen were known to have been killed; one 
hundred and thirty-six were wounded, and thirty-eight 
were missing, lying dead or wounded on the field, or 
prisoners in the hands of the enemy, making a total of 
one hundred and ninety-three, out of three hundred and 
fifty-four, or about three-fifths of the number engaged. 
All of the field officers were wounded; Major Sayles 
severely, with a bullet through his thigh, and left in the 
hands of the enemy, though so disabled that they did 
not carry him away ; Capt. Metcalf and Lieut. Roberts 
were killed ; Lieuts. Ballard and Dascomb died of their 
wounds within a few days ; Capt. Hubbard was shot in 
the forehead and wandered into the rebel lines, where 
he died and was buried by some brother Masons ; Lieut. 
Vickery was badly wounded, remained in the hands of 
the rebels till they retreated, and died on the 8th of 
July; Lieut. Patch was wounded in the abdomen, and 



SECOND REQIMENT. 155 

died on the 10th of July ; Lieuts. Perkins and Converse 
each lost an arm, and eight other officers were more or 
less wounded. 

On the 3d there was hard fighting on the right, 
and the enemy made desperate attempts to break our 
lines at diflferent points, but the Jersey Brigade lost no 
men. On the 4th, in the midst of a drenching rain, the 
men collected and brought in the wounded and buried 
the dead. It was a scene which will not soon be forgot- 
ten by those who participated in or witnessed it. 

The rebels started for the Potomac, and Gen. Meade, 
who was appointed to the command of the army on the 
eve of the battle of Gettysburg, followed in pursuit, 
bringing the eneniy to bay at Williamsport, before they 
could escape across the river. Our cavalry harassed 
the retreating column of the enemy, took and destroyed 
a portion of their pontoon train and captured several 
hundred prisoners. Gen. Meade ordered a charge on 
the evening of the 12th, which was to be executed the 
next morning at daylight, but in consequence of a dense 
fog it was delayed, and when the advance was finally 
commenced the enemy had made good their retreat. 

On the 17th the division crossed the Potomac at Har- 
per's Ferry, and thence followed the valley east of the 
Blue Ridge, with the rest of the army, while Lee moved 
up the valley of the Shenandoah. On the 26th the 
Second marched to Warrenton, where it was met by 
Gen. Marston, who had full authority to form a .brigade 
of the Second, Fifth and Twelfth New Hampshire regi- 
ments, for duty at Point Lookout, where the Govern- 
ment was about to establish a general depot for prisoners 
of war. On the 2d of August Gen. Marston formally 
assumed command of the district of St. Mary's, in which 
Point Lookout was included. Twenty men from the 
Second and Twelfth were detailed as mounted scouts, 
whose duty was to scour the country, look out for con- 



156 TEE ORE AT REBELLION. 

traband trade and prevent communication of the inhabit- 
ants with the enemy. These were pleasant days for 
the three New Hampshire Eegiments. Capt. J. N. 
Patterson, of the Second, was appointed Provost Mar- 
shal of the District, and Capt. George E. Sides was an 
assistant in the same department, having immediate 
charge of the camp. 

The prisoners" were divided into companies of a 
hundred each, with one of their number selected as a 
sergeant in command. They had comfortable shelter, 
plenty of palatable food and ample accommodations for 
cooking, and all sanitary measures were carefully at- 
tended to. Many attempts were made by individuals 
to escape, and in February, 1864, an organized con- 
spiracy to overpower the guard and break camp was 
discovered in season to frustrate it. But few succeeded 
in escaping. Applications to take the oath of allegiance 
and go north were frequent. Many of the prisoners 
desired to enlist in our army and navy, and two regi- 
ments were organized, known as the First and Second 
United States Volunteers, and officered by men promoted 
from the Second and other regiments in the district. 
These regiments afterward did good service at Norfolk, 
Va., and in Colorado, where they were sent against 
the Indians. Several also enlisted in the Second, and 
proved as brave and true soldiers as any who ever 
served under its colors. 

On the 24th of February, 1864, the re-enlisted vpfc- 
erans of the Second left Point Lookout for New Hamp- 
shire on furlough for twenty days. On the 4th of April 
Gen. Hinks relieved Gen. Marston in command of the 
district, and on the 7th the Second started again for the 
Peninsula and reached Yorktown the next day. In 
three days over a hundred of the substitutes, who joined 
the regiment at Point Lookout, deserted, a majority of 



SECOND BEOIMENT. 157 

whom were captured and two of them tried, and shot 
on the 15th. This prompt action effectually checked 
desertions from the Second. 

The Second and Twelfth N"ew Hampshire and the 
One Hundred and Forty-eighth IS&w York were brig- 
aded together, under command of Gen. Wistar, and 
assigned to the Eighteenth Corps, commanded by Gen. 
"W. F. Smith. On the 22d of April the brigade moved 
to "Williamsburg, and remained there until the 4th of 
May, when it marched to James Eiver and embarked 
for Bermuda Hundred. On the 8th of May a general 
advance was made toward Petersburg, and a consider- 
able portion of the Eichmond and Petersburg Railroad 
was destroyed. In this expedition the Second Regi- 
ment had one man killed and six wounded. 

On the 12th another advance was made, this time in 
the direction of Fort Darling. The rebels were steadily 
pressed back until our army confronted the outworks of 
the Fort. The Tenth Corps charged and captured the 
enemy's works upon the, left, while the riflemen of the 
Eighteenth drove the rebels from those upon the right, 
commanding the telegraph pike to Richmond. Gen. 
Hickman's brigade formed the extreme right of the 
line, and to its left was Gen. Wistar's brigade, across 
the pike, where a battery was posted upon the reverse 
side of the captured rebel works. Three hundred 
yards to the front was a strong rebel fort from which 
floated two flags. A half dozen log barracks just out- 
side were occupied by rebel sharpshooters, who were 
driven from their cover by our skirmishers, who kept 
up such a fire from behind the logs and stumps, close 
under the fort, that not a head appeared along the whole 
rebel line. On the 14th and 15th the Second erected a 
breastwork of logs, in front of which, from stump to 
stump, telegraph wires were strung just high enough 
to trip an advancing enemy. Beauregard had concen- 



158 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

trated his troops about Fort Darling. On the morning 
of the 16th a dense fog prevailed, and under its cover 
the rebels prepared for a grand charge to drive back 
the besiegers of the fort. Their lines -were silently 
formed outside the works, and an attack was made 
upon the extreme right to turn that flank of our army. 
There were several companies, composed of young men, 
sent from Richmond for the emergency, who were 
brought directly opposite the line of the Second Regi- 
ment. When the mass of the charging rebels burst into 
sight they were met by a volley from the rifles of the 
regiment which had a terrible effect upon the ranks, 
while those who were left to advance were thrown to 
the ground, line after line, in windrows, by the telegraph 
wires upon the stumps, when the men of the Second 
leaped over their breastworks and used their rifles with 
the most deadly effect. In their desperation the rebels 
renewed the attack, with the same results. The ground 
in front of the breastworks of the regiment was literally 
coved with the rebel dead. The number killed in front 
of the Second's line was estimated at two thousand, 
while a rebel Lieutenant, who was -taken prisoner, ad- 
mitted it to be eighteen hundred, and said that the wire 
arrangement was " a d — d rascally contrivance." The 
Second lost but four men killed and fourteen wounded. 
Capt. James H. Piatt, of Company E, was among the 
killed. 

While Gen. "Wistar's brigade was repulsing the enemy 
so handsomely, a strong force marched cl6ar around Gen. 
Hickman's brigade, and suddenly poured in a volley 
from the rear. The brigade was very badly crushed, 
the men slaughtered, and the General wounded and taken 
prisoner. The right was thus turned, and the Second 
ordered to fall back, but again advanced and occupied 
the breastworks until the whole line was withdrawn and 
a new one established a short distance to the rear. The 



SECOND REGIMENT. 159 

remainder of the day was" passed in skirmishing with the 
enemy, and at night the army withdrew to Bermuda 
Hundred, was placed in a state of siege, and strong for- 
tifications erected. . The Tenth Corps were almost con- 
stantly fighting with the enemy, and the Eighteenth 
Corps frequently turned out and formed behind their 
works. On the 20th a severe fight was had over some 
of our advanced rifle-pits, in which the rebel Major Gen. 
Walker was severely wounded and captured. 

On the 27th the division deserted the works, crossed 
the Appomattox on pontoon bridges, and marched to 
Cily Point, and on the 1st of June joined Gen. Grant's 
great Army of the Potomac. 

BATTLE OF COLD HARBOR. 

On the 1st of June the division of which the Second 
Regiment formed a part, guarded a wagon train to Gen. 
Grant's headquarters, and immediately pushed on to 
where the Sixth Corps was skirmishing with the enemy, 
about a mile beyond. The division was marched rapidly 
down the road, and precipitated into the fight. The 
Second, though not actively engaged, was under a heavy 
artillery fire, and lost several men. At early dawn on 
the 2d, the division advanced through the works behind 
which it had lain, and formed in th^ woods. "Wistar's 
brigade was closed in mass by battalions, the Second 
being the fifth regiment in the column, and the Twelfth 
leading. The order to advance was given, and as the 
brigade emerged from the wood it was met by a terrible 
fire of artillery and musketry. The column dashed for- 
ward half the distance, when the Twelfth halted. The 
three intervening regiments broke, and the Second was 
thrown into confusion. The lines were again formed 
under cover of the woods, and the men threw them- 
selves on the ground, and with hands, knives and bayo- 



160 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

nets, threw up little mounds of earth, for their protection, 
wliich were afterward elaborated into serviceable rifle- 
pits. Men were continually being wounded under the 
constant fire of the enemy. Capt. George "W. Gordon 
was struck on the top of the head, and died an hour 
afterward. Capt. "William H. Smith was shot through 
both legs, and 4ied on the 7th. Lieut. Henry Hayward, 
while using the rifle of one of his men, was pierced 
through the neck with a bullet, and lived but a few hours. 
Sergeant Major M. L. F. Smith was shot through both 
thighs, and died in dreadful agony. The entire loss of 
the regiment during the day was seventy, and of these 
many had only a few days longer to s«rve. This was 
the last battle of the original Second New Hampshire, 
and it was fierce and severe enough to fitly crown three 
years of active service. 

On the morning of the 8th the original men of the 
regiment who had not re-enlisted took leave of their 
comrades and departed for New Hampshire, arriving at 
Concord on the 17th, and were mustered out of service 
on the 2l8t. 

About two hundred and fifty men, including those 
who had re-enlisted, and the recruits who had joined 
the regiment since its first organization, with Capt. J. 
N. Patterson in command, remained in the trenches at 
Cold Harbor. There were still upon the rolls of the 
regiment six hundred and sixty names, which, though 
not sufficient to admit of the muster of a Colonel, al- 
lowed the organization of ten companies to be retained. 
The muster of the other regimental officers, and the 
old organization and numerical designation were con- 
tinued. Capt. J. N. Patterson was appointed Lieut. Col- 
onel and Adjutant John D. Cooper, Major. 

On the 9th of June the regiment was detached from 
the brigade and assigned to duty at the Eighteenth 
Corps headquarters. On the 12th the corps broke 



SECOND REGIMENT. 161 

camp and marched to White House Landing, where 
the Second embarked for Broadway Landing, on the 
Appomattox. On the ^6th, by order of Gen. Butler, it 
reported to Gen. Turner, and in company with other 
troops went on a reconnoisanee, drove in the enemy's 
pickets, destroying two or three miles of the track of 
the Petersburg and Richmond railroad, captured and 
destroyed the camp of a ]N"orth Carolina brigade, and 
marched back to Bermuda Hundred without loss. 

The Second Regiment did duty at the corps head- 
quarters until the 13th of August, when it was assigned 
to the First Brigade, First Division, Eighteenth Corps, 
Col. Aaron F. Stevens, Thirteenth ;N"ew Hampshire, 
commanding, and was stationed in the trenches, on the 
right of the line, in front of Petersburg, where it was 
constantly under fire, and lost men every day, although 
there was no serious fighting. 

On the 26th of August the Eighteenth Corps left 
Petersburg, crossed the Appomattox at Point of Rocks, 
and occupied the line of works, the Second taking its 
position in rear of Battery Sawyer, where it remained 
till September 1st, when it was ordered to proceed to 
Wilson's Landing, on the James River, and reported to 
Gen. Marston, then commanding the defenses of the 
James from City Point to Fortress Monroe. Here the 
regiment made many excursions into the enemy's coun- 
try, and destroyed much property that was of value to 
the Confederate Government. On the 21st Major 
Cooper, with one hundred men, convoyed by a gun- 
boat, went up the Chickahominy river, and destroyed 
a eteam mill, in full working order. The detachment 
returned the next day, bringing with them over fifty 
thousand feet of lumber. Guerillas occasionally made 
their appearance and fired upon the party from the 
banks of the river, but inflicted no injury. On the 
morning of the 27th, at three o'clock, Lieut. Col. Pat- 



162 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

terson, with the Second, fifty men of the Sixteenth 
New York Heavy Artillery and twenty colored cavalry, 
left Wilson's Landing on hoard a large barge, towed by 
the" gunboat Mosswood, proceeded up the Chickahom- 
iny to Hogg Neck, on the left bank of the river, where 
the party disembarked. The order was " to push into 
the country four or five miles, and sweep down to Bar- 
nett's Ferry, near the mouth of the river, gathering 
such horses, mules, cattle and sheep as might be useful 
to the army,'and take along such colored men and their 
families as desired to come into our lines." Soon after 
landing a colored boy, was found who was perfectly ac- 
quainted with that section of country, and he was taken 
along as guide. The force marched to Centerville, ten 
miles, halted for dinner, after which it marched to Gum 
Springs, James City County, and camped for the night. 
The next morning the command marched in the direc- 
tion of Barnett's Ferry, passing several fertile farms, 
well stocked with cattle and sheep, of which they col- 
lected and drove to the Ferry one hundred and fifty, 
and embarked for "Wilson's Landing, where they arrived 
in the evening, without loss or accident. Gen. Marston 
complimented the command very highly for the manner 
in which they had accomplished the objects of the expe- 
dition, remarking that his command had captured their 
share of the twenty-five hundred head of cattle which 
were stolen a few days before by Lee's Cavalry, below 
City Point. 

On the 1st of October orders were received to proceed 
to Aiken's Landing, on the north side of the James, and 
report to Gen. Weitzel, commanding the Eighteenth 
Corps; and on the same evenipg the regiment em- 
barked under command of Major Cooper, Gen. Marston 
having been relieved and ordered to turn over his com- 
mand to the most experienced oflBlcer, and Lieut. Col. 
Patterson, though not the ranking officer present, was 



SECOND REGIMENT. 163 

ordered to remain in command of the first separate brig- 
ade. On arrival at Aiken's Landing the regiment was 
assigned to the Third Brigade of its old division. On 
the 14th Lieut. Col. Patterson rejoined the regiment 
and took command of the brigade. On th^ 27th the 
Second took part in the reconnoisance made by the 
Eighteenth Corps, on the extreme right of the line, near 
the Williamsburg road, meeting the enemy in strong 
force, when some heavy skirmishing took place, in 
which the Second lost a few men. 

About the middle of November the Army of the 
James was reorganized. The white troops of the 
Tenth and Eighteenth Corps were consolidated and 
called the Twenty-fourth, Major Gen. John Gibbon in 
command ; and all the colored troops of the two corps 
were designated as the Twenty-fifth Corps, under Major 
Gen. "Weitzel. The Second was assigned to the Third 
Brigade, Third Division, Twenty-fourth Corps, com- 
manded by Col. Guy V. Henry, of the Fortieth Mas- 
sachusetts. The brigade went into comfortable winter 
quarters, with plenty of wood and water, and remained 
there, with no important occurrence except an occa- 
sional alarm on the picket line, or a flank movement 
of the enemy on the right, until March 3d, 1865, when 
the brigade, now commanded by Brevet Brig, Gen. 
Roberts, received orders to report to Lieut. Gen. Grant, 
for secret service. 

During the winter the Second received two detach- 
ments of recruits, Lieut. Col. Patterson was promoted 
to Colonel, and Major Cooper to Lieut. Colonel, and 
much attention had been paid to' company, regimental 
and brigade drill. The discipline of the brigade was 
such that it was acknowledged to be the best- in the 
Army of the James. Weekly inspections were insti- 
tuted by the corps commander, at which the best regi- 
ment was excused from all outside duty for a week, and 



164 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

it was ordered that the neatest soldier in the division 
should receive a twenty days' furlough. At several in- 
spections the Second was announced as the best regi- 
ment in the brigade, and several members had received 
furloughs as being the neatest and best soldiers in the 
division. 

On the 4th of March the brigade left its pleasant, 
home-like camp with many regrets, for a march to Deep 
Bottom Landing, there to await transports and further 
orders. The march was six miles, through mud knee- 
deep and a heavy rain. After a few hours' delay the brig- 
ade embarked on board transports and about noon the 
next day arrived at Fortress Monroe. For several days 
after its arrival at Fortress Monroe, the brigade was 
engaged in raids into the enemy's country, collecting 
cattle, horses, mules, sheep, tobacco and other produc- 
tions, destroying rebel property and harassing the 
enemy, in which the Second bore a part, without meet- 
ing with any loss of men. "While on a raid, having 
landed at Point Lookout, a special messenger arrived 
from Gen. Grant, with orders to the officers in com- 
mand of the expedition to proceed to White House 
Landing, on the Pamunkey river, and establish there 
a base of supplies for Sheridan's army, which had been 
traveling over the enemy's country for the previous 
three weeks, and was then on its way to the left of 
Gen. Grant's line. The command arrived at White 
House on the 14th of March, and it being the day of 
the ISTew Hampshire election, the Second voted for 
members of Congress. Sherman's army arrived on 
the 18th, men and horses jaded and tired, and remained 
there for rest until the 24th. 

Orders were received for the brigade to march back 
to the camp vacated by them on the 4th, a distance of fifty 
miles, and the line of march was taken, with Sherman's 
army in advance. The old camp was found to be occu- 



SECOND REGIMENT. 165 

pied by a portion of the Twenty-fifth Corps, which had 
been withdrawn from the front. All the troops in the 
Army of the James being ordered by Gen. Grant to the 
left of the line at Petersburg, excepting the Third Di- 
vision, Twenty-fourth Corps, and one division of the 
Twenty-fifth, which were to hold the lines, and to advance 
upon Richmond the moment Lee's lines were broken. 
The Second, being in the Third Division, was ordered 
to occupy Signal Hill. 

On the 1st and 2d of April, terrific cannonading could 
be distinctly heard from the left, one continuous roar of 
artillery for hours, from which it was evident that Grant 
would no longer remain idle around Petersburg, and the 
morning of the 3d told surely of his success on the left, 
and of wonderful doings in front. The explosion of gun- 
boats and arsenals at Richmond was distinctly heard by 
the troops on the north of the James. The sun had for 
the last time risen upon the rebel capital.' 

The division immediately broke camp and started for 
Richmond, over abandoned rebel lines and forts, and an 
uninterrupted march of a few hours found the Second 
on the outskirts of the city, black with smoke and cin- 
ders from the fire then raging at its highest fury. The 
scene was wild and magnificent beyond description. " On 
to Richmond!" had at last been accomplished, and the 
fury of the flames that morning looked as though there 
ought never to be but ashes remain of that " impregna- 
ble city," the capital of the so-called " Southern Confed- 
eracy." 

After a few days the Second moved into one of the 
forts overlooking the city. On the 25th the brigade 
crossed the river to Manchester, and encamped two 
miles from Richmond, on the road leading to the Cum- 
berland coal mines. On the 21st of June the Tenth, 
Twelfth and Thirteenth New Hampshire regiments were 
mustered out of the United States service and left for 



166 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

home. The recruits, whose term of service did not ex- 
pire prior to September 30th, about four hundred, were 
transferred to the Second, thus making the aggregate 
of the regiment nine hundred strong. Lieut. Col. J. N". 
Patterson was mustered as Colonel, Major John D. 
Cooper as Lieut. Colonel, and Capt. Levi N. Converse 
as Major. About one half of the regiments of the Third 
Division had been mustered out of service, and the re- 
mainder were formed into two independent brigades, 
and Col. Patterson was assigned to the command, of the 
Second Brigade. 

On the 10th of July the Division was broken up, and 
the various regiments assigned to the different sub- 
districts into which Virginia had been divided. Col. 
Patterson was assigned to Northern Neck division, 
which embraced King George, Westmoreland, Rich- 
mond, Northumberland and Lancaster counties, with 
headquarters at "Warsaw. Companies A, F, and H, 
were left at Fredericksburg as provost guard, and the 
other seven companies went to Warsaw, To each of 
the counties of Col. Patterson's district one company 
was sent, the commanding officer of the company acting 
as provost marshal of the county, and assistant agent of 
the Freedman's Bureau. On the 22d of August another 
sub-district was consolidated with Col. Patterson's, and 
he was continued as commander of the whole. 

On the 30th of October, Lieut. Col. John D. Cooper 
died of disease, at Baltimore, Md. He was one of the 
original members of the regiment, having enlisted as a 
private in the Goodwin Rifles, afterwards known as 
Company B, at Concord, in April, 1861. He rose by 
merit alone to the rank he held when he died. He was 
one of the bravest men in the regiment, and enjoyed the 
respect and confidence of all its members, as well as of 
a large circle of acquaintances in New Hampshire. 

On the 2d of December the Second started for City 



SECOND BEQIMENT. 167. 

Point to be mustered out of the United States service, 
which took place on the 19th, and on the 21st started 
for New Hampshire. At ^tTashua, Manchester and other 
stations on their route the men were greeted with long 
and hearty cheers. They reached Concord at nine 
o'clock on the evening of the 23d, and marched to the 
hotels where a bounteous repast awaited them. On 
Monday, the 25th, a formal reception was given the 
regiment by Governor Frederick Smyth, and they 
marched through the principal streets of the city, 
escorted by the State Militia and the Veterans, who 
once had the honor of serving under its tattered ban- 
ners. Arriving opposite the State House, after being 
reviewed by the Governor, speeches were made by Gov- 
ernor Smyth, Ex-Governor' Gilmore, Adjutant Gen. 
Natt Head, Col. Walter Harriman, and Col. Peter San- 
born, which were handsomely and feelingly replied to 
by Col. Patterson. On Tuesday the 26th, the men were 
paid off and discharged. ISo New Hampshire Regiment 
was so long in the service, and none left a more honor- 
able record for bravery and good conduct thrqughout 
the war than the Second. 

The roll of the Second Regiment, during its organiza- 
tion, contained more than three thousand names. Every 
regiment but two from the State was supplied, in part, 
with officers from its ranks ; and more than thirty regi- 
ments in the field had upon their rosters names of men 
that were once identified with it. It marched more than 
six thousand miles, participated in more than twenty 
pitched battles, and lost in action upwards of one thou- 
sand men. 

The notice of the Second Regiment should not be 
closed vpithout a mention of Miss Harriet P. Dame. 
She was connected with it, near or remote, during its 
whole term of service. Wherever the wounded, sick 



168 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

and suffering were, Miss Dame was always found, doing 
cheerfully her utmost for their relief. Many officers 
and enlisted men owe their lives to her unremitting care. 
Major Sayles, who was shot through the leg at Gettys- 
burg, and Captains Perkins and Converse, who each 
lost an arm, say that through her exertions their lives 
were saved. She attended as kindly and carefully to 
privates who needed her care, as to officers of the 
highest rank, and is remembered by all with the affec- 
tion due a mother or sister. 

Much of the fame enjoyed by this regiment is due to 
the energy and zeal of General Gilman Marston. Al- 
though he was promoted to Brigadier General, and as- 
signed to' duty away from the regiment, he left it with 
regret and watched its fortunes with an unusual interest. 
A very strong attachment existed between him and his 
first command, from the commencement to the close of 
the war. 



THIRD REGIMENT. 169 

THIRD REGIMENT. 



This was the second regiment raised in the State un- 
der the call of the President for three years troops. It 
was recruited, as the two preceding regiments had been, 
throughout the State, though Manchester furnished 
three companies. On the 31st of July, 1861, an order 
was issued by the Governor offering a bounty of ten dol- 
lars to be paid to each man who had, or might thereafter 
enlist and be mustered into the Third Regiment. The 
same order was carried into effect in recruiting for other 
regiments subsequently enlisted. 

The men rendezvoused at Camp Berry, Concord, early 
in August, and between the 22d and 26th the companies 
were all mustered into the United States service, by Mar 
jor Seth Eastman, of the regular army, consisting often 
hundred and forty-seven officers and men, including a 
regimental band of twenty-four pieces, under the leader- 
ship of Grustavns "W. Ingalls, of Concord. 

The following were the commissioned officers and the 
non-commissioned staff of the regiment during its term 
of service, and their record, as gathered from the Adju- 
tant General's books, and from other sources. 

FIELD AND STAFF OFFICEKS. 

Colonels — ^Enoch Q. Fellows, of Sandwich. 

Resigned Jane 26, 1862. 

John H. Jackson, of Portsmouth. 
Wounded slightly July 18, 1863. Honorably discharged Feb. 24, 1864 

John Bedel, of Bath. 

Parolled as prisoner of war, Dec. 9, 1864. Appointed Brigadier General U. 
B. Vols., by Brevet, for gallant and meritorious seryicee, to date from March 
13, 1865. Mustered out as Colonel, July 20, 1865. 

Lieut. Colonel — John H. Jackson, of Portsmouth. 

Promoted to Colonel, June 27, 1862. 



170 THE QBE AT REBELLION. 

John Bedel, of Bath. 

Wounded July 10, 1863. Captured at Fort Wagner, July 18,1863. Pro- 
moted to Colonel while prisoner of war, April 6, 1864. 

Josiah I. Plimpton, of Milford. 

KUled at Deep Run, Va., Aug. 16, 1864. 

James F. Randlett, of Nashua. 

Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

Majors — John Bedel, of Bath. 

Promoted to Lieut. Colonel, June 27, 1862. 

Josiah I. Plimpton, of Milford. 

Promoted to Lieut. Colonel, April 6, 1864. 

James F. Randlett, of I^ashua. 

Wounded severely May 14, 1864. Promoted to Lieut.. Col. Oct. 12, 1864. 

"William H. Trickey, of Wolfeborough. 
Wounded slightly June 19, 1865. Wounded acoidentaUy April 4, 1865. 
Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

Adjutants — Alfred J. Hill, of Portsmouth. 

Besigried April 14, 1862. 

Alvin H. Libby, of Manchester. 

Killed at Fort Wagner, July 18, 1863. 

Elb.ridge J. Copp, of IsTashua. 

Wounded severely May 13, 1864. Wounded severely Aug. 16 1864. Mus- 
tered out Oct. 16, 1864. 

Samuel N. Jackson, of Nashua. 

Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

Quartermasters — Arthur S. Nesmith, of Franklin. 

Resigned Nov. 15, 1862. 
John R. Haynes, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Captain, said A. Q. M., U. S. Vols. Sept. 20, 1864. 

George B. Bingham, of Nashua. 

Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

Surgeons — Albert A. Moulton, of Concord. 

Bested Nov. 16, 1862. 
Andrew J. H. Buzzell, of Dover. 

Appointed Lieut. Colonel U. S. Vols., by Brevet, for gallant and meritorious 
conduct at the storming of Fort Fisher, N. C, to date from March 13, 1865. 
Died of disease at Wilmington, N. C, March 28, 1865. 

Frank B. Kimball, of Dover. 

Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

Assistant Surgeons — ^Benjamin F. Eaton, of Hanover. 

Eesigued Oct. 1, 1862 
Andrew J. H. Buzzell, of Dover. 

Promoted to Surgeon, Nov. 17, 1862, 

Charles A. Burnham. 

Honorably discharged Sept. 22, 1864. 



THIRD BEQIMENT. 171 

Daniel Farrar, of Troy. 

Resigned May 4, 1863. 

Frank B. Eimball, of Dover. 

Promoted to Surgeon April 20, 1865. 

George W. Manter, of Manchester. 

Mustered out July 20, 1866. 

Chaplain— Henry Hill, of Manchester. 

' Mustered out Aug. 26. 1864. 

Sergeant Majors — Thomas M. Jackson, of Portsmouth. 

promoted to Second Lieut. Dec. 16, 1861. 

Elbridge J. Copp, of N'ashua. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. Jan. 1, 1863. 

WiUiam L. Dodge, of Hampton. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. Jan. 4, 1864. 

George F. Lord, of I^Tewmarket. 

Besigned warrant ajid transferred to Company 6, March 10, 1864. 

John H. Thing, of Exeter. 

Mustered out Aug. 23, 1864. 

Marquis L. Holt, of I^elson. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. April 6, 186&. 

Thomas Smith. 

Mustered out July 20, 1865 

Quartermaster Sergeants — C. P. Brainard, of Keene. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. Nov. 17, 1862 

Varnum H. Hill, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Captain and A. Q. M. Vols., May 19, 1864. 

George R. James, of Hampton. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. Jan. 24, 1865. 

WiUiam A. Swallow, of Nashua. 

Mustered out June 26, 1865. 

John Clark, of Keene. 

Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

Commissary Sergeants — George H. Miner. 

Mustered out Oct. 4, 1864. 
George B. Bingham, of !N^ashua. 

, Promoted Regimental Q. M., Not. 9, 1864. 

Charles H. Berry, of Claremont. 

Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

Hospital Stewards — Moody Sawyer, of Concord. 

Discharged for disability at Hilton Head, S. C, Sept. 9, 1862. 

Perry Kittredge, of Concord. 

Mustered out Aug. 23; 1864. 

Albert D, Scovell, of "Walpole. 

Mustered out July 20, 1865. 



172 THE ORE AT REBELLION. 

Principal Musicians — Harrison B. Wing, of Manchester- 
Discharged for disalpUty at Hilton Head, S. C, Sept. 7, 1868. 

John L. Randall of Deerfield. 

Discharged for disability May 10, 1862. 

Michael E. A. Galvin, of Manchester. 

Mustered out Aug. 23, 1864. 

Thomas McEnry, of Manchester. 

Mustered out Aug. 23, 1864. 
COMPANY OFFICERS. 



Co. A. — Captains — Rufus F. Clark, of Manchester. 

Kesigned Deo. 14, 1863. 

Orrin M. Dearborn, of Hampton. 

Mustered out Feb. 11, 1865. 

James Plaisted, of Portsmouth. 

Not mustered. Mustered out July 20, 1866. 

Mrst Lieuts. — ^Alvin H. Libby, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Adjutant, April 15, 1862. 

John R. Haynes, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Quartermaster, Nov. 16, 1862. 

Daniel J. Flanders, of Nashua. 

Kesigned July 2, 1863. 

Ruthven W. Houghton, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Captain, June 4, 1864. 

John M. Parker, of Fitzwilliam. 

Mustered out Oct. 31, 1864. 

Dustin Marshall, of Manchester. 

Wounded severely Jan. 15, 1865. Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — John R. Haynes, of Manchester. 

Promoted to First Lieut. April 15, 1862. 

Daniel J. Flanders, of Nashua. 

Transferred to Company E. 

Ruthven "W. Houghton, of Manchester. 

Promoted to First Lieut March 15, 1863 

John Kirwin, of Manchester. 

Promoted to First Lieut. July 28, 1863. 
John M. Head, of Exeter. 

Honorably discharged March 24, 1864. 

George H. Giddings, of Exeter. 

Wounded slightly Aug. 16, 1864. Promoted to First Lieut. Oct. 12, 1864 

Co. B. — Captains — John E. Wilbur, of Exeter. 

Dismissed May 11, 1868. 



THIRD REGIMENT. 173 

Thomas M. Jackson, of Portsmouth. 

Besigned Aug. 8, 1863. 

Henry S. Dow, of Lisbon. 

Mustered out Oct. 7, 1864. 

Roger "W. Woodbury, of Manchester. 

Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Henry H. Ayer, of Fisherville. 

Promoted to Captain Aug. 1, 1862. 

Andrew J. Fogg, of Exeter. 

Resigned May 9,1863. 

David "Wadsworth, Jr., of N'ashua. 

Transferred to Company P. 

John Kirwin, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Captain, May 24, 1864. 

William L. Dodge, of Hampton. 

Mustered out Oct. 16, 1864. 

Joseph Ackerman, of Ifashua. 

Promoted to Captain Jan. 24, 1866. 

John S. Bryant, of Exeter. 

Died of disease. May 23, 1865. 
Thomas Price, of Barnstead. 

Not mustered. Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — ^Andrew J. Fogg, of Exeter. 

Promoted to First Lieut. June 17, 1862. 

Jonah Libby, Jr., of Boston, Mass. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Nov. 16, 1862. 

Charles F. Brainard, of Keene. 

Promoted to First Lieut. May 13, 1863. 

J. Homer Edgerly, of Dover. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Jan. 2, 1864 

Roger "W. "Woodbury, of Manchester. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Jan. 4, 1864. 

Michael J. Connolly, of Manchester. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Oct. 12, 1864. 

Co. C. — Captains — ^Michael T. Donohoe, of Manchester. 
Promoted to Colonel 10th Begt. Aug. 6, 1862. 

Robert H. Allen, of Manchester. 

Honorably discharged June 29, 1864. 

"William H. Trickey, of "Wolfeborough. 
Wounded slightly Sept. 3, 1864. Do. Oct. 27, 1864. Promoted to Major, 
Jan. 7, 1865. 

Daniel Eldredge, of Lebanon. 

Declined. Honorably discharged June 22, 1865, to date May 21, 1865, to 
accept appointment in Veteran Beserve Corps. 



174 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

Joseph. Ackerman, of N'ashua. 

Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Robert H. Allen, of Manchester. 
Wounded sUghtly June 16, 1862. Promoted to Captain June 21, 1862. 

Walter Cody, of Manchester. 

Wounded severely June 16, lS62. Eesigned Nov. 15, 1862. 

Jonah Libby, Jr., of Boston, Mass. 

Transferred to Company D. 

George Stearns, of lifashua. 

Promoted to Captain Jan. 8, 1864 

Eoger W. "Woodbury, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Captain Oct. 58, 1864. 

Michael 'P. Donley, of New Ipswich. 

Promoted to Captain April 16, 1865. 

Marquis L. Holt, of ll^elson. 

Mustered out July 20, 1865 

Second Lieiits. — "Walter Cody, of Manchester. 

Wounded slightly June 16, 1862. Promoted to First Lieut. June 1, 1862. 

Joseph J. Donohoe, of Manchester. 

Promoted to First Lieut. March 7, 1863. 

Joseph "W. Ackerman, of Hampton. 

Besigned July 28, 1863. 

Charles S. Hazen, of Milford. 

Transferred to Company D. 

John M. Parker, of Fitzwilliam. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Jan. 6, 1864. 

John H. Hitchcock, of Richmond. 

Promoted to First Lieut. May 24, 1864. 

Samuel Robinson, of Rochester. 

Not mustered. Died of wounds June 2, 1864. 
Michael P. Donley, of 'Sew Ipswich. 
Wounded severely Aug. 16, 1864. Promoted to First Lieut. Oct. 28, 1864. 

Co. D. — Captains — Charles F. Dunbar, of Hampton. 

Resigned June 20, 1862. 

Robert H. Allen, of Manchester. 

Transferred to Company C. 
"William H. Maxwell, of Manchester. 
Wounded severely June 16, 1864. Mustered out Dec. 14, 1864. 

John S. James, of Hampton. 

Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — W. H. Cornelius, of Portsmouth. 

Resigned March 14, 1868. 

Ruthven "W. Houghton, of Manchester. 

Tituisfenred to Company A. 



THIRD REGIMENT. 175 

Jonah Libby, Jr., of Boston, Mass. 

Promoted to Captain Jan. 2, 1864. 

J. Homer Edgerly, of Dover. 

Promoted to Captain Oct. 1, 1864. 

James E. McCoy, of Pelham. 

Wounded Oct 27, 1864. Promoted to Captain Jan. 4. 1865. 

James H. Plaisted, of Portsmouth. 

Promoted to Captain July 20, 1865. 

William E. Hammett, of Manchester. 

Not mustered. Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — 0. M. Dearborn, of Hampton. 

Promoted to First Lieut. June 27, 1862. 

John M. Head, of Exeter. 

Transferred to Company A. 

Charles S. Hazen, of Milford. 

Promoted to First Lieut. May 24, 1864. 

"William H. Burbank, of Tamworth. 
Com. revoked. Transferred to Company G, by order of War Department. 

Co. E. — Captains — Josiah I. Plimpton, of Milford. 

Promoted to Major June 27, 1862. 

Kichard Ela, of Concord. 

KiUed at Drury's Bluff, Va., May 13, 1864. 

Andrew J. Wadlia, of Wolfeborough. 
Wounded severely Aug. 16, 1864. Discharged on account of wounds Feb. 
10, 1865. ' 

Michael P. Donley, of Ifew Ipswich. 

Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Richard Ela, of Concord. 

Promoted to Captain April 16, 1862. 

John F. Langley, of l^ottingham. 

Resigned July 3, 1862. 

Orrin M. Dearborn, of Hampton. 

Transferred to Company H. 

"William H. Trickey, of "Wolfeborough. 

Promoted to Captain July 7, 1864. 

Daniel Eldredge, of Lebanon. 

Wounded severely Aug. 16, 1864. Promoted to Captain Jan. 4, 1865. 

Edwin ISr. Bowen, of Eichmond. 

Transferred to Company K. 

"Walter J. Richards, of Manchester. 

Not mustered. Mustered out July 20, 1865, 

Second Lieuts. — Geo. "W. Jackson, of Concord. 

Besigned Dec. 16, 1861. 



176 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

Thomas M. Jackson, of Portsmoutti. 

Promoted to First Lieut Aug. 1, 1862. 
Daniel I. Flanders, of Nashua. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Nov. 16, 1862. 

David "Wadsworth, Jr., of Ifashua. 

Promoted to First Lieut. May 13, 1863. 

Eugene J. Button, of l!?"asliua. 

Transferred "to Company F. 

J. Homer Edgerly, of Dover. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Jan. 2, 1864. 

John H. Tredick, of Portsmouth. 

Wounded severely June 16, 1864. Died of wounds July 6, 1864. 

Co. F, — Captains — James F. Randlett, of Nashua. 

Promoted to Major April 6, 1864. 

David "Wadsworth, Jr., of Nashua. 

Wounded slightly May 16, 1864. Discharged for disability Sept. 24, 1864. 

J. Homer Edgerly, of Dover. 

Appointed Major U. S. Vols, by brevet, for gallant and meritorious conduct 
at the storming of Fort Fisher, N. C, to date &om March 13, 1865. Mustered 
out July 20, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Charles S. Burnham, of Nashua. 

Promoted to Captain June 27, 1862. 

Henry A. Marsh, of Nashua. 

Besigned Dec. 31, 1862. 
George Stearns, of Nashua. 

Transferred to Company C. 

David Wadsworth, Jr., of Nashua 

Promoted to Captain April 6, 1864. 

Charles S. Hazen, of Milford. 

Wounded severely May 13, 1864. Honorably discharged Deo. 17, 1864. 

Fred. H. Tuttle, of Milton. 

Mustered out July 20, 1865. 
Second Lieuts. — Henry A. Marsh, of Nashua. 

Wounded slightly June 16, 1862. Promoted to First Lieut. July 4, 1862. 

George Stearns, of Nashua. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Jan. 1, 1863. 
Elbridge J. Copp, of Nashua. 

Promoted to Adjutant July 20, 1863. 

Eugene J. Button, of Nashua. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Jan. 8, 1864. 
"William L. Dodge, of Hampton. 

Promoted to First iieut. May 24, 1864. 
Joseph Ackerman, of Nashug,. 
Wounded Aug. 16, 1864. Promoted to First Lieut. Oct 28, 1864. 



THinn REGIMENT. 177 

"Walter Mellisli, of Keene. 

Promoted to First Lieut. April 6, 1865. 

James Quinlan, of Manchester. 

Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

Co. G. — Captains — ^Pierce L. Wiggin, of Ossipee. 

Resigned April 14, 1862. 

Eicliard Ela, of Concord. 

Transferred to Company E. 
George W. Emmons, of Lebanon. 

Resigned Sept. 18, 1863. 

Jonah Libby, Jr., of Boston, Mass. 

WTonnded seyerely June 11, 1864. Discharged on account of wounds Oct 
19, 1864. 

Charles A. White, of Manchester. 

Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — George "W. Emmons, of Lebanon. 

Promoted to Captain April 2, 1862. 

Henry C. Handerson, of Keene. 

Promoted to Captain March 7, 1863. 

Joseph J. Donohoe, of Manchester. 

Honorably discharged April 14, 1863. 

Leonard F. Place, of Rochester. 

Resigned July 22, 1863. 

Andrew J. Wadlia, of Wolfeborough. 

Promoted to Captain May 24, 1864. i 

Charles A. White, of Manchester. 

Wounded severely Aug. 16, 1864. Promoted to Captain Nov. 9, 1864. 

Arlon S. Atherton, of Richmond, 

Promoted to Captain May 15, 1865. 

George R. James, of Hampton. 

Not mustered. Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — ^Henry C. Handerson, of Keene. 

Promoted to First Lieut. April 2, 1862. 

Darius K. Scruton, of Salmon Tails. 

Wounded July 16, 1862. Died of wounds Aug. 8, 1862. 

Andrew J. Wadlia, of Wolfeborough. 

Promoted to First Lieut. June 14, 1863. 

Roger W. Woodbury, of Manchester. 

Transferred to Company B. 

Simon N". Lamprey, of Exeter. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Jan. 5, 1864. 

William Davis. 

Honorably discharged Sept. 4, 1864. 



178 THE OBEAT REBELLION. 

Co. H.— Captains— Eobert C. Dow, of Manchester. 

Resigned June 21, 1862. 

Welbee J. Butterfield, of Dover. 

Transferred to Company K. 

Henry H. Ayer, of Fisherville. 

Wounded seyerely Aug. 26, 1863. KiUed at Drury's Bluff, Va., .\iay 16, 
1864. 

John Kirwin, of Manchester 

Mustered out Nov. 11, 1864. 

James E. McCoy, of Pelham. 

Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — ^Wm. H. Maxwell, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Captain June 17, 1862. 

Andrew J. Fogg, of Exeter. 

Transferred to Company B, June 17, 1862. 

Thomas M. Jackson, of Portsmouth. 

Pronioted to Captain May 18, 1863. 

Charles F. Brainard, of Keene. 

Eesigned Aug. 10, 1863. 

Orrin M. Dearborn, of Hampton. 

Promoted to Captain Deo. 15, 1863i 

Frank L. Morrill, of Manchester. 

Died of wounds July 13, 1864. 

John S. James, of Hampton. 

Promoted to Captain April 6, 1865. 

"Walter Mellish, of Keene. 

Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — J. F. Langley, of IsTottingham. 

Promoted to First Lieut. AprU 15, 1862. 

Joseph C. "Wiggin, of Sandwich. 

Killed Aug. 22, 1862. 

Henry F. Hopkins, of Manchester. 

Honorably discharged April 17, 1863. 
Frank L. Morrill, of Manchester. 

Promoted to First Lieut. May 24, 1864. 

James E. McCoy, of Pelham. 

Wounded slightly June 16, 1864. Promoted to First Lieut. Oct. 13, 1864. 

William Hammett, of Manchester. 

Promoted to First Lieut. July 20, 1865. 

Co. I. — Captains — Ralph Carlton, of Farmington. 

Wounded, severely June 16, 1862. Died of wounds July 17, 1862. 

"William H. Maxwell, of Manchester. 

Transferred to Company D. 



THIRD REOIMENT. 179 

Charles S. Burnham of ISTashua. 

Honorably discharged Dec. 6, 1863. 

Ruthven W. Houghtoii, of Manchester. 

Honorably discharged Oct. 24, 1864 

John H. Hitchcock, of Richmond. 

Not mustered. Dismissed March 3, 1863. 

Arlon S. Atherton, of Richmond. 

Not mustered. Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — John H. Thompson, of Holderness. 

Died of disease Aug. 27, 1862. 

Henry S. Bow, of Lisbon. 

Promoted to Captaiu Jan. 1, 1864. 

Eugenye J. Button, of iSTashua. 

Killed at Drury's Bluff, Va., May 16, 1864. 

John H. Hitchcock, of Richmond. 

Promoted to Captain Jan. 4, 1865. 

Jesse C. Pushee, of Nashua. 

Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — Samuel M. Smith, of Heene. 

Promoted to First Lieut. June 22, 1862. 

Leonard F. Place, of Rochester. 

Promoted to First Lieut. April 15, 1863. 

"William M. Trickey, of Wolfehorough. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Jan. 1, 1864^ 

Charles A. White, of Manchester. 

Promoted to First Lieut. May 24, 1864. 

John S. James, of Hampton. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Oct. 28, 1864. 

James M. Chase, of Concord. 

Not mustered. Discharged for disability July 7, 1865. 

Co. K. — Captains — ^Israel B. Littlefield, of Dover. 

Resigned April 1, 1862. 

George "W. Emmons, of Lebanon. 

Transferred to Company G. 

"Welhee J. Butterfield, of Dover. 

Resigned March 6, 1863. 

Henry C. Handerson, of Keene. 

Resigned Sept. 18, 1863. 

George Stearns, of ISTashua. 

Mustered out Oct. 31, 1864. 

George H. Giddings, of Exeter. 

Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Welbee J. Butterfield, of Dover. 

Promoted to Captain June 22, 1862. 



180 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

Samuel M. Smith, of Keene. 

Besigned June 13, 1863. 

Andrew J. "Wadlia, of Wolfeborough. 

Transferred to Company G. 

Simon N. Lamprey, of Exeter. 

KUled at Deep Run, Va., Aug. 16, 1864. 

George H. Giddings, of Exeter. 

Promoted to Captain Jani 4, 1865. 

Edwin K Bowen, of Richmond. 

Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — William H. Miles, Madbury. 

Resigned Feb. 6, 1862. 

Henry S. Dow, of Lisbon. 

Transferred to Company I. 

Marshall P. Hawkins, of Fitzwilliam. 

Resigned Nov. 28, 1863. 

Daniel Eldredge, of Lebanon. 

Promoted to First Lieut. July 7, 1864. 

Arlon S. Atherton, of Richmond. 

Wounded and captured Aug. 16, 1864. Released. Promoted to First Lieut. 
Not. 9, 1864. 

All the field officers had had experience in the army, 
and some of them had been under fire. Col. Fellows 
was educated at "West Point Military Academy, had 
held several commissions in the State Militia, and was 
Adjutant of the First Regiment. Lieut. Colonel Jack- 
son served as Lieutenant and Captain in the Mexican 
war, was in several battles, and had held commissions — 
the highest that of Colonel — in the State Militia. Ma- 
jor Bedel also served in the Mexican war, having en- 
listed as a private, and rose to the rank of Lieutenant, 
by reason of meritorious conduct. They brought to 
their positions what was much needed at that time — 
knowledge of their duties in field and camp. The regi- 
ment was composed of good men, well officered, and 
the State expected from it much honor, as well as use- 
fulness to the service, nor was it in any way disap- 
pointed. 



THIRD REGIMENT. 181 

COLONEL JOHN H. JACKSON. 

Colonel Jackson is a son of John A. H. Jackson, of 
Portsmouth. He was horn at that place on the 20th of 
October, 1814. He was appointed Lieutenant in the 
First Regiment !N"ew Hampshire Militia, in 1841, and 
rose step by step to be Colonel of the same in 1848. On 
the 9th of April, 1847, he was appointed First Lieuten- 
ant of the ITinth Regiment, United States Army, and 
accompanied his regiment on its march to the City of 
Mexico, being in all the battles in the Valley of Mexico, 
and was brevetted for gallant services on the 19th and 
30th of August, 1847, at the battles of Contreras and 
Churubusco, and commissioned Captain Feb. 17, 1848. 
He was mustered out of service the following August. 
After the fall of Chepultepec, the Ninth Regiment 
pressed forward to the Aqueduct, under a shower of 
shot and shells. An escapet-ball hit Lieut. Jackson 
in the breast and glanced off to the ground. It struck 
a Bible he carried in his breast pocket, the gift of a sis- 
ter as he left home. The Bible was deeply but obliquely 
indented by the ball, and to it he owed the preservation 
of his life. Col. Jackson was an inspector in the Boston 
Custom House from 1853 to 1861. On the 6th of Au- 
gust of the same year he was appointed Lieut. Colonel 
of the Third Regiment, and Colonel of the same on the 
resignation of Col. Fellows, in June, 1862, which posi- 
tion he' held until Feb. 24, 1864, when he was honorably 
discharged. His life in the war of the rebellion, from 
August, 1861, to the date of his discharge forms a part 
of the history of the Third Regiment. On the 1st of 
January, 1867, Col. Jackson was appointed an Inspector 
in the Boston Custom House, which position he now 
holds. He was removed by Collector Goodrich, in 1861, 
and by him re-appointed to the same position in 1867, 
as a reward for services rendered the country. 



182 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

GENERAL JOHN BEDEL. 

General Bedel, of Bath, is a son of Gen. Moody Bedel. 
He was born on the Sth of July, 1822, at Indian Stream 
Territory, what is now Pittsburg. He was educated at 
Wewbury, Yermont, Seminary, read law with Hon. 
Harry Hibbard, of Bath, and was admitted to the Graf- 
ton County bar in 1850. He enlisted as a private in the 
ISTinth Kegiment United States Infantry, March 25, 1847, 
and was soon promoted to First Sergeant of Company 
H. He was discharged at Vera Cruz, Aug. 8, 1847, on 
account of disability. Dec. 30, 1847, he was appointed 
Second Lieutenant in the same regiment, and served 
until August, 1848, when he was honorably discharged. 
For some years subsequent to the Mexican war he was 
clerk in one of the Departments at Washington. Au- 
gust 6, 1861, he was appointed Major of the Third Eegi- 
ment, and at once entered upon the duties of his position, 
with great energy and industry. On the resignation of 
Col. Fellows, in June, 1862y Major Bedel was promoted 
to Lieut. Colonel ; and while prisoner of war, April 6, 
1864, to Colonel of the same regiment. He was wounded 
by a solid shot at Morris Island, on the 10th of June, 
1863. He returned to duty on the 16th, and was cap- 
tured far in advance of his men, in the night assault up- 
on Fort "Wagner, Morris Island, July 18, 1863, and was 
not paroled until Dec. 10, 1864 — remaining in the hands 
of the enemy nearly seventeen months — was declared 
exchanged, at Annapolis, Md., March 31, 1864, and re- 
turned to his regiment at "Wilmington, I^. C, as Colonel, 
on the 11th of April, 1865. He was appointed Briga- 
dier General United States "Volunteers, by Brevet, "for 
gallant and meritorious services, to date from March 
13, 1865." He served with distinction through the 
war, and was mustered out with his regiment, July 
20, 1865. 





ColS? HHVSt Bv' Bng- Geri^ U- S-V 



THIRD REaiMENT. 183 

When taken prisoner, Gren. Bedel was carried to 
RicUand County Jail and South Carolina Penitentiary, 
at Columbus, S. C. While the exposure of the prisoners 
confined here to the elements was not as severe as those 
confined at Belle Isle, Andersonville and Sa'lishury, they 
were almost continually threatened with being shot, 
hung, or exposed on the rainparts of Fort Sumter. 
The prisoners were kept in close confinement, robbed, 
starved, exposed to cold without fuel, shot at and shot 
into for attempting to escape, and then put in irons and 
solitary confinement for months, as a punishment. Col. 
Bedel was put in solitary confinement and so kept five 
months, from the 7th of March to the 7th of August, 
1864, for not submitting with sufficient docility to his 
treatment. Capt. Shadrach T. Harris, of the East Ten- 
nessee Cavalry, was kept in irons twenty-six months, 
but they did not dare to carry their threats to shoot and 
hang him into execution. Col. Bedel probably suffered 
no more than others who were confined in the same 
prison, and perhaps not as much as some ; but his suf- 
ferings from cold, hunger, solitude and threats of death 
in every shape, and his feelings when, after seventeen 
months of such confinement, he was paroled and sent 
into our lines, may be more easily imagined than de- 
scribed. 

When the war was over. Gen. Bedel returned to his 
home, in Bath, where he still resides, and enjoys the 
confidence and respect of a large circle of warm friends 
and acquaintances. He represented his town in the 
popular branch of the Legislature in 1868 and 1869, and 
was the candidate of the democrats for Governor in 
1869, receiving the fall vote of his party. To him, as 
much as to any single man, belongs the credit of mak- 
ing the Third one of the naost efficient, brave and hon- 
ored regiment that went from ISTew Hampshire during 
the four years' war of the rebellion. 



184 TEE QBEAT REBELLION. 

By act-of Congress of July 22d, 1861, the President 
was authorized to call for volunteers, not to exceed 
500,000 in all. He gave Gen. T./W. Sherman authority 
to organize a secret expeditionary Corps. The Third 
I^ew Hampshire Regiment was assigned to this corps, 
and was the first in the field. 

On the 3d of September, 1861, the Third Regiment 
struck tents and took transportation for Camp "Winfield 
Scott, on Long Island, E". Y., with ten hundred and 
thirty-one officers and men, fully equipped and armed 
with Enfield rifled muskets, where they arrived next 
day. The Band was full and excellent; the camp and 
garrison equipage abundant and substantial ; the trans- 
portation — ninety horses and twenty-five wagons — of a 
superior quality, hardly surpassed by that of any volun- 
teer regiment which took the field during the rebellion; 
the hospital department thoroughly organized and sup- 
plied with all the requisites for the preservation of the 
health of the troops ; the means complete for preparing 
food for the men properly and speedily ; nor were the 
means of mental and moral culture neglected. The 
regiment lacked nothing but that experience which 
every volunteer organization must acquire in the field 
before it is fitted for active campaigning. 

Camp Winfield Scott was designed as a camp of in- 
struction for the corps of sixteen or more regiments. 
The Third was the first to arrive and had its choice of 
quarters. In it were many officers and men who had 
previously seen service, which was a great aid in disci- 
p^ning the regiment and instructing the men in acquir- 
ing soldierly habits. 

Late on the 3,4th of September orders were received 
for the regiment to be ready in fifteen minutes to leave 
for parts unknown. It took cars accordingly, leaving 
behind all but arms and equipments, and at midnight 
on the 15th was landed at the depot in Washington, D. 



THIRD REGIMENT. 185 

C, and next day went into camp near the Congres- 
sional burying ground. The United States took posses- 
sion of the tents, horses, wagons and camp equipage, and 
they were never returned to the regiment. 

"While at Long Island, the ladies of Hampton Plains 
had made arrangements to present the regiment with a 
stand of national colors, as a compliment to its discipline 
and good conduct, and a delegation of gentlemen was 
sent with it to Washington, where it was presented by 
Dr. Scudder, in behalf of the ladies. The source 
from whence it came and the cause of its presentation 
endeared it to every soldier in the regiment, and its rent, 
perforated and tattered folds, deposited in the State 
House at Concord, attest with what gallantry it was 
borne and guarded by its grateful recipients. 

At Washington the Third Regiment was joined by 
the 8th Maine, and 46th, 47th and 48th 'Sew York, and 
together composed the First Brigade of Sherman's 
Division. The President visited the regiment and com- 
plimented it in very high terms for its fine appearance. 

On the 4th of October the regiment moved to An- 
napolis, Md. While there Mrs. Gen. Veile, presented 
it with a stand of national colors. Gov. Hicks, of Md., 
speaking in behalf of the donor, as follows : 

Col. Fellows — ^Dear Sir : Allow me to present to you 
and your command this rich emblem — a gift from the 
accomplished and palriotic Mrs. Brig. Gen. Veile. 

Col. Fellows took the colors, unfurled them to the 
view of his command, and the large number of specta- 
tors, military and civil, who had been invited to be pres- 
ent, and responded as follows : 

Gov. Hicks, Gentlemen, and Fellow-soldiers — The 
First RegimentNewHampshireVolunteers (three months' 
soldiers), on their way to Washington passing through 
the city of New York, were met by a delegation of Sons 



186 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

of ITew Hampshire, residents of that city, and presented 
a beautiful stand of colors. I had'the honor of being a 
member of that regiment, and we all felt very proud to 
receive the emblem of our nationality from such a source; 
"We carried that banner with pride through that cam- 
paign. Being honorably discharged, we took it with us 
up to our home among the old granite hills of New 
Hampshire. Our qountry still bleeding, the call of duty 
was imperative, and this regiment was immediately or- 
ganized ; and on our way to the seat of war, we en- 
camped a few days at Long Island, near the town of 
Hempstead, from which quiet village we had the honor 
and great pleasure of receiving a beautiful flag, as a testi- 
mony of respect, from the ladies residing there. . What 
adds still more to the importance of that gift, is the fact 
that we did not stay long enough to have the flag fln- 
ished, but received it in Washington, tWough a dele- 
gation of prominent citizens, headed by the Rev. Dr. 
Scudder. 

During our stay in the city of Washington of about 
two weeks, a beautiful and accomplished lady in the 
person of Mrs. Brig. G-en. Veile appears in camp, like 
a bright oasis in a barren desert, remaining with her 
husband, our gallant Brigadier, long enough to observe 
some of the hardships of a soldier's life and appreciate 
his sacrifices ; then quietly leaving her husband for her 
beautiful home on the shore of Long Island, and us in 
forgetfulness as we supposed ; but no, though far away 
she still remembers, and as'a token of that remembrance 
and of respect, sends us this beautiful flag, 

" Oh, long mky it wave 
O'er the land of the free and the home of the braye." 

This is the third time a New Hampshire regiment has 
received a flag from citizens of New York. One from a 
number of gentlemen, one from a small society of ladies, 
and this magnificent one from a single lady. Fellow- 



THIRD REGIMENT. 187 

soldiers, what mean these gifts? I will tell you. It 
shows that you have made a favorable impression as a 
re^ment, wherever you have been, and now the ques- 
tion comes, shall we maintain the reputation we have ? 
I answer for you, we will try. And now, sir, in behalf 
of this regiment, I beg through you, to thank Mrs. Veile 
for this splendid token of her consideration ; also I pray 
convey to her the assurance that with God's blessing 
we will return with this flag waving triumphantly over 
us, or die beneath its folds. 

The flag cost in N^ew York city $300.00. The fringe 
is of gold, very heavy, and the staff trimmings of pure 
silver. Upon one piece is engraven, " Presented to Col. 
Fellows' regiment, 3d 'S. H., by Mrs. Veile." 

This flag was riddled with bullets in the memorable 
battle of Deep Run, Aug. 16, 1864. It was followed by 
a band of as valiant men as ever received their nations' 
ensign from the hands of fair ladies, and has been safely 
deposited beside the other war worn, battle stained flags 
of the regiment in the State House. 

On the 18th the Third Eegiment went on board Gen. 
Sherman's flagship Atlantic, and left the harbor on the 
19th for Fortress Monroe, arriving there the next day, 
where they remained^ until the 29th, when they sailed 
for Port Royal, and after experiencing a most terrific 
gale, made that harbor on the 4th of November. After 
a council of Gen. Sherman and other officers it was de- 
termined not to land any troops until the forts on each 
side of the river should be reduced by the Navy. On 
the 7th the bombardment commenced in earnest, was 
grand beyond description and the rebels were com- 
pletely shelled out. The Third landed on the 9th, went 
into camp in a cotton and corn field, and in clearing a 
camp and drill ground burned a large quantity of cot^ 
ton. 



188 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

Colonel Fellows issued the following Thanksgiving 
Proclamation, At the dinner sentiments were offered 
by representatives from New Hampshire, and responded 
to with spirit* The occasion was much enjoyed by the 
regiment and others who participated in the exercises : 

Headquarters 3d N. H. V., "I 
Hilton Head, S. C, Nov. 28, 1861. / 

According to the custom of our fathers I propose to 
observe this day after New England fashion. For al- 
though we are now in South Carolina, we can not for- 
get that we are citizens of New Hampshire. 

I sincerely congratulate you, fellow-soldiers, on your 
good conduct and obedience to orders, and above all on 
your reputation as a regiment. 

Let us therefore, on account of the innumerable bless- 
ings by which we have been and are still surrounded, offer 
up our hearts in thanksgiving and praise to that Being 
who orders all things well. And may the time soon 
come when we can bid farewell to war's dread alarms 
and return to the quiet pursuits of peaceful life. 

You will be excused to-day from all unnecessary drill 

and parade. 

E. Q. FELLOWS, Colonbl. 

From the 9th of November to the 10th of December, 
the regiment was engaged in drilling, doing picket and 
guard duty and furnishing working details on the en- 
trenchments. Dec. 31st, the 47th and 48th New York 
regiments were ordered to' report to Gen. Stevens to 
take part in an expedition against the enemy's works 
at Port Royal Ferry, on the Coosaw River. The former 
regiment having but one field officer, Major Bedel was 
ordered to accompany the expedition. The object was 
fully accomplished by the aid of gun boats, after a two 
days' fight, Jan. Ist and 2d, 1862. The enemy's worka 



THIRD REGIMENT. 189 

were captured and dismantled, one fortification gun se- 
cured, and all buildings used as quarters burned. The 
troops engaged received the thanks of the General com- 
manding the department, in general orders. This was 
the first real engagement of the land forces in the De- 
partment of the South. 

January 29th, 1862, Capt. Donohoe, with a platoon of 
forty men from his company, was ordered to report on 
board the steamer McClellan, Gen. Sherman's fiagship 
and headquarters, to act as a body guard, and did not 
return to the regiment until about the first of February. 
The 48th !N'ew York having gone on an expedition un- 
der Gen. Veile, the 55th Pennsylvania regiment was 
assigned to the first brigade. During the month of 
February all the troops, except the Third New Hamp- 
shire and five companies of the 8th Maine regiment, 
had left Hilton Head for duty elsewhere. 

March 18th, Gen. Sherman having left for Fernandina, 
Fla., Col. Fellows, being in command of the Post, or- 
dered Lieut. Col. Jackson to make a reeohnoisance in 
the direction of Bluffton, with all the available men of 
the regiment, leaving Major Bedel, much to his dis- 
pleasure, in command of the camp. The regiment was 
accompanied by two field pieces and a detachment of 
the 3d Rhode Island Artillery. About three o'clock on 
the morning of the 10th they took water transportation 
and made for White House Point, where companies A 
and F were ordered to put in and remain quiet until 
daylight, while the balance of the command was to land 
at another point further on. This disposition resulted 
in the capture of four of the enemy's pickets, without 
firing a gun. The command took boats and proceeded 
to Bull Island. On the 22d the largest portion of the 
command proceeded to Blufi'ton, where a company of 
rebel cavalry was posted, which evacuated the place at the 
first fire. The command returned to camp on the 24th. 



190 TEE QBE AT REBELLION. 

On the night of the 28th of March the enemy made 
a demonstration on Edisto Island, surprised the 55th 
Pennsylvania, posted there, killed two and captured 
twenty-three of the regiment. Major Bedel, happening 
to be at Edisto, volunteered to accompany a field piece 
and ninety men of the 47th IvTew York, to re-enforce 
Gol. White, of the 55th Pennsylvania, then engaged 
with the enemy, about ten miles from Col. Moore's 
headquarters. He joined Col. White in season to aid 
hipa in forcing the enemy to retire from Edisto and 
Little Edisto Islands, and reported to Col. Moore Tjefore 
midnight. The 55th Pennsylvania afterward abandoned 
its post and retired to the vicinity of the 47th N'ew 
York. Gen. Hunter, who had just relieved Gen. Sher- 
man in the command of the Department, ordered the 
Third New Hampshire, Col. Fellows, to re-occupy the 
abandoned post at once. The regiment left Hilton Head 
on the 3d of April by steamer, and landed on Edisto 
the same night, and the next day marched across the 
island to its new quarters. Col. Fellows was ranking 
officer, in command of the Post, and did not accompany 
the regiment. Four pieces of the 3d Rhode Island Artil- 
lery, Capt. Day, joined the command. Two companies 
under Major Bedel, with one piece of Capt. Day's bat- 
tery, were stationed about a mile in front of Regimental 
Headquarters, toward Jehossie Island; one company, 
under Capt.' Donohoe, was stationed near the south 
Edisto river; one, under Capt. Dow, was detailed as 
provost guard a,t Post Headquarters, and other com- 
panies were variously disposed of in similar duties until 
the 1st of June. Meantime a demonstration was made 
by Major Bedel, about the 10th of April, on the enemy's 
pickets at Watt's Cut, but with strict orders not to bring 
on an engagement. Two or three days afterward a 
reconnoisance in force was made by Lieut. Col. Jackson 
at the same point, the rebel pickets driven in and their 



rniRD REGIMENT. 191 

breastworks leveled. On the 17th a simultaneous ad- 
vance was made by the' Third IN'ew Hampshire and 
Forty-seventh New York, on Jehossie Island, and the 
enemy driven in. Several other reconnoisances were 
made on Jehossie and Bonny Hall islands. 

' On the 23d of April Col. Fellows was relieved by 
Gen. Wright, and left for home on a sixty days' fur- 
lough. ,He resigned, his resignation was accepted on 
the 26th of June, and he did not return to the regiment. 
On the 27th Lieut. Ool. Jackson was promoted to Col- 
onel, Major Bedel to Lieut. Colonel, and Capt. Josiah 
L Plimpton, of Co. E, to Major. 

Soon after Gen. Hunter had relieved Gen. Sherman 
of- the command, the department was divided into two 
parts, the northern division, in which the Third was 
serving being under the command of Gen. Benham. 
The regiment was brigaded with the First Massachu- 
setts Cavalry, Third Rhode Island Artillery, and Sor- 
rell's New York Volunteer Engineers, which was known 
as the " Division Headquarters Brigade," and was com- 
naanded by Col. Robert "Williams, of the First Massachu- 
setts Cavalry, he being the ranking officer. On the_ 
4th of May seventeen recruits joined the regiment. 

On the 1st of June an order was received for the 
Third, and Forty-seventh New York to report before 
daylight the next morning at Post Headquarters, ten 
Wiiles distant, which done they were ordered to cross 
the North Edisto river to John's Island, and follow Col. 
"Williams, wbom they overtook after a hard march, 
thtotigh rain and mud, of seven miles. On the morning 
of the 4th the command marched for Legareville, twelve 
miles, in a tremendous storm and dense darkness, through 
mud and water half-leg deep. Arrived at their place of 
destination they found that Gen. Stevens, who went by 
water, had, with the aid of gunboats, already driven the 
rebels from some of their batteries apd effected a land- 



192 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

ing on James Island, having taken three guns and dis- 
abled another. ' . 
, On the 6th the command crossed to James Mand, and 
on the 7th was sent to relieve the advanced pickets. 
During the night it was ordered to make a sudden dash 
on the rebel pickets and gain any information practica- 
ble as to the enemy's strength and position. Major Be- 
del was field oflicer of the day in command of the pickets, 
and was directed to detail one company to go forward to 
a house occupied by the rebels, and within their picket 
lines. Oapt. Plimpton's Company E, was selected, and 
at once went forward to the house, the enemy retiring 
before them. At a concerted signal Companies C, D, 
and K, moved forward to the support of Company E ; 
but as strong works and many mounted guns could be 
seen, further advance was not deemed practicable. In 
the afternoon the experiment was repeated, for- the pur- 
pose of drawing the enemy's fire. Capt. Donohoe's 
Company C, moved rapidly forward and passed the 
house, supported by portions of the regiment and a 
squad of Cavalry. The enemy opened fire, from his 
batteries, and as the Third retired he followed so closely 
that the line was forced back some distance. The 
ground was, however, retaken, and the regiment was 
soon after relieved and ordered to join Col. Williams' 
Brigade, two miles further to the left. 

On the lOtl^ a brisk fight took place between the 
pickets under Col. Guss, of the 79th Pennsylvania, and 
a regiment of the enemy, which advanced too far in re- 
counoitering our lines. Maj or Bedel was present at the 
picket line when the enemy made his appearance, vol- 
unteered to act as aid to Col. Guss, and participated in 
the figbt, and himself captured four prisoners, including 
a Captain of a Georgia Regiment, with his sword, belt, 
and pistol, and captured and brought in seven muskets. 
Col. "Williams gave him permission to retain the Cap- 



TSIRD BMaiMENT. 193 

tain's arms and one musket. Fifteen of the enemy 
were killed and found on the field, seven wounded and 
taken prisoners, two of whom died, and it was reported 
that sixty-five others were wounded ; while the loss on 
our side was three killed and twelve wounded. 

On the 16th of June the Third Regiment received its 
first haptism in blood. Gen. Benham had ordered 
an advance on Secessionville, about two miles from 
camp. Gen. Stevens commenced the attack on the 
" Marsh Battery " before daylight, and was repulsed 
three times before the division of Gen. Wright was en- 
gaged. A battalion of the Third Rhode Island was sent 
forward as skirmishers, and the Third 'Hew Hampshire 
was ordered to support it and the Ifinety-seventh Penn- 
sylvania, which were said to be in front. On coming 
within rifle-shot of the rebel batteries no troops were 
found in front, and the regiment was therefore halted. 
It proved that the two regiments mentioned had ob- 
liqued to the right, and came out in front of Stevens' 
division. The Third was thrown forward as near the 
enemy's battery as a marsh and creek intervening would 
admit, and opened fire, silencing every gun in the bat- 
tery and driving the enemy out with so hot a fire that 
not a gun could be loaded or discharged for an hour. 
In reaching this position the regiment was enfiladed by 
a field battery with grape and canister. A fort to its 
left and rear opened with shell and round shot. Mus- 
ketry from the rear soon followed, and finally shells 
from Gen. Stevens' battery, and from gunboats in Stono 
river, intended for the enemy's marsh battery, fell, in- 
stead, into the ranks of the Third. Efforts were made 
to secure re-enforcements to the regiment, or some artil- 
lery, to silence the enemy's fire in the rear, but without 
avail. The Third lay within forty yards of the rebel 
fort, and would have crossed the stream, had it been 
fordable, and easily taken the works; but large re-en- 



194 TEE OBEAT REBELLION. 

forcements were brought in from Charleston, by the 
enemy, and the guns of the men got so foul as in many 
cases to be useless ; and it appearing to be of no advan- 
tage to hold the position longer, Lieut. Col. Jackson gave 
the order to retire, which was accomplished in good or- 
der, and soon after the regiment returned to camp. The 
brigade commander, Col. "Williams, in a letter to G-ov. 
Berry, of New Hampshire, said : " I do not believe it 
possible for men to have acted with more courage, and 
I desire particularly to call your attention to the marked 
gallantry of Lieut. Col. Jackson, Major Bedel, and Capt. 
Plimpton. Their conduct was even noticed by the 
enemy, as it was afterward stated at a flag of truce." 
Capt. Plimpton was acting Major at this time. 

The regiment went into the fight with twenty-six offi- 
cers and five hundred and ninety-seven men, of whom 
one hundred and four were killed and wounded. Capt. 
Ralph Carlton, a gallant and promising officer, was hit 
in both legs by a solid shot, and died the same day. 
Lieut. D. K. Seruton was wounded in the hand and arm, 
and died of his wounds on the 8th of the following Au- 
gust. Lieut. "Walter Cody was severely wounded in the 
thigh. Lieut. Henry C. Handerson was wounded se- 
verely, and Lieuts. R. H. Allen and H. A. Marsh slightly. 
Lieut. S. M. Smith had his shoulder strap shot off, and 
Lieut. John R. Haynes had his boot leg ripped open 
with a musket ball. Col. Jackson mentioned, as partic- 
ularly deserving notice, besides the field officers. Cap- 
tains Donohoe, "Wilbur and Randlett, Adjutant Libby 
and Sergeant Major Copp. The regiment went into the 
battle eagerly and retreated reluctantly. It behaved so 
well as to command respect, and received the commend- 
ation of all. It won a name for valor that wiU never be 
forgotten so long as the rebellion is remembered. The 
failure was solely for want of good generalship. Upon 
the retura of Gen, Hunter, who had been temporarily 



TSinD nmiMENT. 595 

absent 'from the Department, Gen. (Benham was sent to 
Washin^on under arrest. 

Afuci" spebding a fortnight in btisy preparation for 
shelling the enemy out by regular approaches, an ordel* 
was received to evacuate the island. The regiment, 
except Co. C, then on picket, embarked July 2d, on 
tteamer Cosmopolitan, and landed at Hilton Head the 
next day, where it was soon joined by Co. C. Three 
men deserted from Co. H to the enemy on the 6th of 
August. On the morning of the 2l8t the enemy 8u"r- 
prised Co. H, on Pinkney Island, killed Lieut. Joseph 
C. "Wiggin, commanding the company, and two privates; 
wounded three privates, two of whom subsequently died, 
and captured thirty'-six men with their arms. Disease, 
incident to the climate, prevailed to a great extent and 
deaths were frequent. Lieut. John H. Thompson, com- 
missary of the regiment, died on the 27th of August, 
honored and lamented. One hundred and seven re- 
cruits joined the regiment from the 13th of September 
to the 2lSt of October, about which time Lieut. Col. 
Jackson, Major Bedel and 'Capt. Plimpton received 
commissions promoting them to Colonel, Lieut. Colonel 
and Major, respectively, dated June 27, 1862. Oen. 
Hunter was relieved by G-en. 0. M. Mitchell. 

The re^ment under Col. Jaokstxu-, accompanied an 
■expedition, under Gen. Brannan, up Broad river, with 
the design of burning certain bridges on the railroad 
from Charleston to Savannah, and participated in the 
battle of Pocotaligo, on the 22d of October, having 
Dhree men wounded. On this 'expedition Lieut. Samuel 
M. Smith, with twelve men of his company and eight 
oarsmen from a gunboat, landed and captured a rebel 
Lieutenant and three men, with their arms and equip- 
ments, and three horses. The main object of the expe- 
dition failed, and the regiment returned to camp at 
Hilton Head, on the 23d. Yellow fever prevailed to 



196 TEH GREAT REBELLION. 

some extent, and on the SOth Gen. Mitchell fell a vic- 
tim, and was succeeded in comsaand of the Department 
by Gen, Brannan, until the return of Gen. Hunter, in 
January, 1863. 

On the 16th of February a movement was commenced 
against Charleston. Six companies of the Third were 
advanced on Pinkney Island, and intrenched them- 
selves. On the 3d of April, an expedition having been 
organized, the Third embarked on board steamers. On 
the 7th the navy, under Commodore Dupont, com- 
menced a. bombardment of Fort Sumter and other 
batteries in Charleston harbor, which continued from 
three until five o'clock in the afternoon, which was all 
of any moment that was done against Charleston at this 
time. The Third, with other troops of the expedition 
returned to their old camp at Hilton Head, left on the 
16th of February. 

On the 3d of July, the regiment, with all its baggage, 
embarked on board the steamer Boston, sailed for Stono 
Inlet, landed on Folly Island before daylight the next 
morning, and went into camp. On the evening of the 
9th, the rest of the brigade having arrived, the Third 
and other regiments embarked in small boats, intend- 
ing to surprise the enemy's batteries and capture their 
garrison. They rowed quietly up Folly river, and at 
viaybreak next morning came in sight of the enemy's 
works on Morris Island. Sunrise was the signal for at- 
tack both by water batteries and the land force. As the 
sun appeared our batteries opened with a tremendous 
crash, taking the enemy entirely by surprise. The 
shots from their batteries were wild and uncertain ; and 
they were at a loss whether to devote their attention to 
the monitors on one side, the flotilla of boats on the 
other, or the batteries in front. A detachment of the 
Seventh Connecticut was sent on shore to reconnoiter, 
but were driven back to their boats. The battalion of 



TSIBD REGIMENT. 197 

the Seventh was then landed at another point, supported 
by four companies of the Forty-eighth 'Eew York, and 
the Third New Hampshire, and the enemy was driven 
from his rifle pits and his batteries at the lower end of 
the island, making no stand till he reached Fort "Wag- 
ner, at the other extreme. Eleven siege guns and mor- 
tars, with two hundred prisoners were captured. In 
this affair the Third behaved with great gallantry. Its 
loss was nine killed and thirty-one wounded. Lieut. 
Col. Bedel was struck while in front of the regiment, 
by a partially spent shell from Fort "Wagner, and se- 
verely contused in the legs and body, but insisted upon 
remaining in the field until it was decided that no 
further advance was to be made that night, when, by 
order of Assistant Surgeon Kimball, he was carried to 
Folly Island with the other wounded. 

On the morning of the 11th, an attack was ordered on 
Fort "Wagner, in which the Third was part of the re- 
serve; but the movement was not made. From this 
time until the 15th, the regiment held an advanced posi- 
tion, under a continuous shelling from "Wagner, Cum- 
mings Point and Sumter. On the 12th one man was 
killed and two were wounded. On the 15th the Third 
was relieved. On the 16th Lieut. Colonel Bedel, though 
not recovered from the wound received on the 10th, re- 
turned to duty with the regiment. 

THE CHARGE ON FORT WAGNER. 

On the 18th of July, 1863, occurred the celebrated 
charge on Fort "Wagner. The Third was at first posted 
at the headquarters of General Seymour, the division 
commander. Just at night, when dispositions were 
made for the assault, it was ordered to form in rear of 
the Sixth Connecticut, and moved to the flank of one 
the batteries, where it lay down to escape the fire of the 



198 THE QREAT BMBBLLION. 

enemy. The Third was on the left of the, brigade. In 
the aidvance a small creek was encountered, which at 
that time was flooded by the tide. At this point Col. 
Jackson ordered Lieut. Col. Bedel to go ahead and see 
if the ground was practicable. While doing so the 
enemy opened with artillery and small arms from the 
fort upon the advancing column with terrible effect, 
crowded as it was on the narrow neck of sand constitut 
ting the only approach. Many of the Fifty-fourth were 
cut down in an instant, and the organization of the regir 
ment totally annihilated. The Third took cover under 
some sand knolls, and failed to follow where the. Lieut, 
Colonel had been ordered to go, and when he turned to 
communicate the fact that, the ground was passable it 
was nowhere to be seen by him. He, discovering, a 
party of the enemy which was outside the fort, hurrying 
toward an entrance to the right of it, mistook them for 
a party of his regiment, or at least a portion of the at' 
tacking column, sought to join them in the anticipated 
capture of a gun near the flag-staff which was particu- 
larly annoying and fatal to the column ; but upon getting 
near enough to distinguish persons in the dark, found 
his supposed friends to be enemies, and in attempting 
to flee from them was driven into the creek, captured 
and taken into the fort. The regiment was ordered to 
halt by Col. Jackson, and failed to advance to the fort, 
and was finally withdrawn under orders from Gen. 
Strong. The failure was attributable to no soldier in 
the regiment. Every man would have gallantly fol- 
lowed any commander who woul4 have led him. The 
loss to the regiment was fifty-five killed, wounded and 
missing. Among the killed was Adjutant Libby, one 
of the most gallant officers of the regiment, who was 
serving as assistant adjutant general on General Strong's 
staff. Coli Jackson, Captains Ayer and Jackson, and 
Lieut, Button were wounded. 



THIRD BE9IMENT. 1! 

The army sat down before Fort "Wagner, to take it by 
regular approaches. This required one-third of the 
command constantly at the front ; and while there cas- 
ualties were of hourly occurrence. At every tour of 
duty the Third returned with the number of its effective 
men reduced ; yet it so well sustained its reputation that 
it was one of the three regiments selected by Gen. Grill- 
more " to be at all hours in front of the army." Col. 
Jackson was ordered to l^ew Hampshire on the 21st of 
July, on recruiting service, and did not return to the 
regiment until the 20th of January, 1864. Major Plimp- 
ton was on detached service, Lieut. Col. Bedel was a 
prisoner of war, and Capt. Randlett, as ranking officer, 
was in command of the regiment. 

On the 6th of September it was determined to try 
another charge on Fort Wagner, and Gen. Terry se- 
lected the Third New Hampshire to lead the " forlorn 
hope," under command of Capt. Randlett. The' follow- 
ing account of the affair was published in the Detroit 
Tribune from an army correspondent, and is vouched 
for by Chaplain Hill, as true, so far as it goes : ' 

" A New Hampshire regiment had been engaged in 
several successive battles, very bloody and very desperate, 
and in each engagement had been distinguishing them" 
selves more and more ; but their success had been very 
dearly bought both in men and officers. Just before 
taps, the word came that the fort they had been invest- 
ing was to be stormed by daybreak the next morn- 
ing, and they were invited to lead the ' forlorn hope.' 
For a time the brain of the Colcmel fairly reeled with 
anxiety. The post of honor was the post of danger ; 
but in view of all circumstances, would it be right, by 
the acceptance of such a proposition, to involve his alf 
ready decimated regiment in utter annihilation? He 
called his long and well-tried chaplain into council with 



200 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

him, and asked what was to be done, and the chaplain 
advised him to let the men decide for themselves. 

" At the Colonel's request he stated to the regiment 
all the circumstances. Il^Tot one in twenty probably 
would be left alive after the first charge. Scarcely one 
of the entire number would escape death except as they 
were wounded or taken prisoners. ISo one would be 
compelled to go if he did not go with all his heart. 
Think it over, men, calmly and deliberately, and come 
back at twelve o'clock and let us known your answer. 
True to the appointed time, they all returned. ' All ? ' 
said I, 'Yea, aiv, all, without exception!' and all of them 
ready for service or for sacrifice ? ' iN'ow ! ' said the 
chaplain, ' go to your tents and write your letters — set- 
tle all your worldly business, and whatever sins you 
have upon your consciences unconfessed and unfor- 
given, ask God to forgive them. As usual, I will go 
with you, and the Lord do with us as seemeth Him 
good.' 

" The hour came ; the assault was made ; on these 
noble spirits rushed, into ' the imminent deadly breach,' 
right into the jaws of death. But like Daniel when he 
was thrown into the lion's den, it pleased God that the 
lion's mouth should be shut. Scarcely an hour before, 
the enemy had secretly evacuated the fort, and the for- 
lorn hope entered into full possession, without the loss 
of a single man." 

After the occupation of Forts "Wagner and Gregg by 
our forces, the Third was detailed for provost and post 
duty. From the 25tti of November to the 2l8t of De- 
cember two hundred and seventy-eight recruits joined 
the regiment. Col. Jackson resigned on surgeon's cer- 
tificate of disability, and his resignation was accepted 
on the 24th of February, 1864. Between the assault on 
Fort Wagner, July 18th, 1863, and the 1st of March, 



THIRD REGIMENT. 201 

1864, the loss in the regiment was thirty-two killed and 
wounded. Captains Ayer and Libby, Jr., and Lieuten- 
ants Houghton and Edgerly were among the wounded. 
Between January Ist and March 2d, two hundred and 
seventy of the men re-enlisted as veterans, and left for 
home on thirty days' furlough, under Capt. Randlett. 

On the 1st of March an order was issued that the 
regiment should be mounted, under the designation of 
the " Third New Hampshire Mounted Infantry." On 
the 7th of the same month horses were furnished, the 
two flank companies were armed with Spencer repeat- 
ing carbines, and on the 1st of April left for Jackson- 
ville, Florida, under Major Plimpton. On arrival there 
four companies, under Capt. Maxwell, were ordered, to 
open communication with our troops at Pilatka, a small 
town seventy-five miles up the St. Johns river, which 
they accomplished, and returned to Jacksonville, and 
found the regiment dismounted. On the 6th of April, 
Lieut. Col. Bedel — ^who was still a prisoner of war — was 
promoted to Colonel, Major Plimpton to' Lieut. Col- 
onel, and Capt. Randlett to Major. While at Jackson- 
ville, desertions to the enemy from the recently arrived 
substitutes became quite frequent, and Lieut. Col. 
Plimpton secretly posted a line of pickets outside the 
usual line, and abbut midnight they seized one of the 
deserters. The next morning he was tried by a drum- 
head court martial, and in an hour he was shot. This 
was the last desertion in that campaign^ 

The Tenth Corps was assigned to the Army of the 
James, and the Third was ordered to report to Gen. 
Terry, at Gloucester Point, where they arrived on the 
29th of April, and were met there by the Veteran Vol- 
unteers of tiie regiment, who had just returned from 
their furlough in New Hampshire. The Third, now 
recruited to eight hundred men, was brigaded with the 
Seventh New Hampshire, and Sixth and Seventh Con- 



202 TSE GREAT REBELLION. 

necticut, under Gen. Joseph R. Hawley, and were as- 
signed to the First Division under Gen. Alfred H. 
Terry, and the Tenth Corps, commanded by General, 
Gillmore. 

From this time they were engaged in the siege of 
Petersburg, until the 9th of May, when early on that 
morning the regiment, under Lieut. Col. Plimpton, 
moved out of camp to participate in a general advance 
on that place. They moved, under orders from Gen. 
Terry, on to Brandon Bridge, about two miles from 
Petersburg, and to the extreme right of the advancing 
forces. A detachment of cavalry was sent with the 
regiment to act as couriers to keep up communication. 
Lieut. Col. Plimpton's instructions were to hold the po- 
sition, and to allow no troops to cross the bridge ; to 
reconnoiter the position of the enemy, and learn the 
condition of the bridge, and depth of water in the river. 
The regiment arrived, about dark within five hundred 
yards of the bridge, when a halt was ordered, and a 
line of battle formed. Capt. Ela, with his company, 
was then detached as skirmishers, and advanced to 
within about one hundred yards of the bridge, when he 
met the enemy advancing. A fire was opened almost 
simultaneously on both sides, grape and canister shot 
from the opposite shore scattering through the woods 
for several minutes, when the firing ceased. !Night 
coming on intensely dark, it was not deemed advisable 
to advance further, and pickets were posted in all direc- 
tions, and a, close watch was kept in expectation of an 
advance of the enemy. During the night the whistling 
of locomotives and rumbling of cars could be distinctly 
heard in Petersburg, bringing troops from the south to 
the defense of the city. 

"While reconnoitering the next morning, the enemy 
opened with grape and canister, firing but a few rounds^ 
however. The position was held until about one o'clock, 



THIMD BEQIMENT. 203 

P. M., when orders were received from Gen. G-illmore 
to retire as quickly and quietly as possible. The regi- 
ment immediately ffeU back about two miles, reported 
to Gen. Terry, and rejoined the division. At this part 
of the line heavy fighting had been going on during the 
forenoon. A corps of the rebel army had made an at- 
tempt to flank Gen. Butler's line on the right, and Gen. 
Terry's division, holding this part of the line, had suf- 
fered considerable loss. On the arrival of the Third both 
armies were under a flag of truce, at the request of the 
enemy, to bury the dead. Late in the afternoon the 
whole army withdrew from the position, and returned 
to camp at Bermuda Hundred. The loss of the Third 
in this move was four wounded. 

BATTLE OF DBURT'S BLUFF. 

On the 12th of May Gen. Butler commenced an ad- 
vance toward Eichmond with the Tenth and Eighteenth 
Corps, and arrived at Drury's Bluff on the evening of 
the 13th. The next morning the corps made a long 
detour to the left, crossing the railroad and moving on 
to Chester Court House. An outpost of the enemy 
captured here, gave information that the rebels were 
directly in front, strongly intrenched. The Third was 
selected to lead an advance, and was ordered to move 
to the left, find the^extreme right of the rebel intrench- 
ments, and if possible, make a charge upon their rear. 
The regiment advanced on the double quick, passing 
the remainder of the brigade ; then making a short turn 
to the left through the woods, soon found themselves in 
an open field, with indications of the enemy in front. 
Passing an abandoned rifle pit, they filed into a belt of 
woods and halted, Capt. Maxwell was then ordered 
forward with his company as skirmishers, to feel the 
way. Advancing down through a ravine he crossed a 



204 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

stream, the bridge over wMch was destroyed — ^the men 
passing over on the one remaining plank, in single file. 
The regiment was ordered forward, closely following 
the skirmishers. As it afterward' appeared, they were 
then inside the rebel fortifications. Advancing left in 
front, the left wing of the regiment had crossed the 
stream, and filed to the left, preparatory to forming a 
line of battle, when several shots were fired ; then a vol- 
ley came crashing through the woods, and a line of 
rebels was seen through the trees advancing down upon 
them. Too late to re-form, the lieutenant colonel or- 
dered in a loud, ringing voice, " Forward, Third New 
Hampshire, charge!" The left wing had' faced to the 
right, and charged forward with a well known yell. 
The right wing moved on as fast as possible over the 
stream, in great confusion, many of the men throwing 
themselves into the muddy water waist deep and wad- 
ing over. The Third Few Hampshire charged, and 
though all organization was lost, and the dead and the 
wounded were falling on every side, they moved on up 
the slope unflinchingly. Volley after volley was poured 
in on either side, till it was one continued roll of mus- 
ketry. The rebel line was broken and gave way, 
forced back into and outside their own works. Just at 
this juncture the First Brigade of Gen. Terry's division 
charged the enemy in front, and the victory was complete 
— forcing the enemy from their line of works on to Fort 
Darling — ^thus securing to our forces the whole of the 
first line of the outer defenses of Richmond. For this 
victory the Third New Hampshire paid dearly, and when 
it was proved by subsequent events to be a useless vic- 
tory, it was indeed found a bloody and terrible sacrifice. 
The fighting lasted but twenty minutes; but in those 
twenty minutes more than two hundred of New Hamp- 
shire's bravest and best fell dead or wounded. Among 
the foremost fell the gallant Capt. Kichard Ela, while in 



THIRD BEQIMENT. 205 

advance of his men, leading them in the charge,. He 
was shot through the brain, and expired almost instantly. 
Among the wounded were Major Randiett, Adjutant 
E. J. Copp, and Lieut. Hazen. 

The enemy kept up a continual and harassing fire, 
and during the 15th and 16th about twenty-five men 
were killed or wounded. Early on the morning of the 
16th the army was advanced to the extreme front, and 
the Third, with the rest, were ordered to prepare for a 
charge upon the enemy's lines. Soon heavy firing com- 
menced on the right. The enemy, in a dense fog, had 
made a flank movement to the left, and attacked the 
Eighteenth Corps in the rear. The Third, with a part 
of the Tenth Corps, were ordered to the assistance of 
the Eighteenth, when the firing extended along the line, 
and the attack became general. Instead of a charge, a 
retreat was ordered, and the whole line commenced fall- 
ing back. As this movement commenced the enemy 
came in on the left and rear. Gen. Terry rode up and 
called for the Third New Hampshire, and said to Lieut. 
Col. Plimpton — " I want the Third l^ew Hampshire to 
charge the enemy advancing on the left." The charge 
was made and the enemy were routed and forced back 
to their intrenchments. The retreat was continued, and 
at night the Army of the James were in their intrench- 
ments at Bermuda Hundred. The Third suffered con- 
siderable loss in the retreat. Capt. Ayer, a brave and 
valuable officer, was mortally wounded on the morning 
of the 16th, when Lieut. Button took command of the 
company, and soon received a death wound. 

The Union army fell back several miles, and built a 
line of works extending across the peninsula from the 
Apponiattox to the James. The Third Regiment was 
encamped in the rear of a battery, where it was con- 
stantly exposed to fire friam the rebel artillery, and lived 
mainly in bomb-proof. 



206 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

On the 2d of June the rebels charged a portion of the 
line held by the Seventh Connecticut, and drove them 
back on their reserves. The Third ISew Hampshire was 
ordered to retake the lost ground, which was speedily 
accomplished by a gallant charge of four companies, 
commanded by Capt. Maxwell. They captured one 
hundred and fifty prisoners, and lost eight men killed 
and wounded. 

On the 15th Gen. Grant's army crossed the James 
river, and, joining Gen. Butler's left, advanced on 
Petersburg. To meet this advance, Beauregard with- 
drew from Butler's front, and on the 16th a reconnois- 
sance was made by the latter's whole force. Having 
nearly reached the Petersburg and B,ichmond turnpike, 
they met Picket's Division of Lee's army, hastening to 
the assistance of Beauregard, and backed by the whole 
army of BTorthern Virginia. Capt. Maxwell, with two 
companies deployed as skirmishers, advanced toward 
the turnpike. Having repulsed three advances of the 
enemy, our forces were ordered to retire, and finally 
reached their old line. During the -fight the Third lost 
about forty in killed and wounded. Lieut. Tredick was 
mortally wounded, and died on the 6th of July. Cap- 
tains Maxwell and Libby, and Lieut. McCoy were sev- 
erally wounded. Prom the 13th of May to the 19th of 
June inclusive, out of eight hundred and eighty-one, 
which left Gloucester Point, the regiment lost in killed, 
wounded and missing, two hundred and eighty-nine 
men. 

In July the regiment exchanged their Enfield for 
Spencer rifles, a very effective breach-loader and seven- 
shooter, ^hus armed the troops were almost invinci- 
ble. On the 13th of August the Tenth Corps moved 
across the James river, to co-operate with the Second 
Corps in an advance on Richmond. It marched to Deep 
BoWom, thence through works occupied bv our troops 



THIRD REGIMENT. 207 

under Gen. Foster, to the extreme front, where a line 
of battle was formed, the Thir,d on the left of the brig- 
ade. The pickets of the enemy were forced back, and 
the brigade advanced to an open field, fronting a line of 
rebel earthworks, and here formed double column in 
mass, to support a light battery, the Third having posi- 
tion on the right of the Seventh Connecticut. This po- 
sition was held, under fire, from early on the morning 
of the 14th until four o'clock in the afternoon, when the 
brigade moved to the right about one hundred yards, 
and formed a line of battle. Lieut. Col. Plimpton was 
ordered by Gen. Terry to hold the Third Regiment in 
readiness to charge upon an advancing line of the 
enemy. This position was held until ten o'clock in the 
evening, when the army commenced a fiank movement 
to the right, in the direction of Malvern Hill, and biv- 
ouaced for the night near Ifew Market road from Deep 
Bottom. The next day, the 15th, an attack was made 
upon the enemy's, lines, the Third, with its brigade be- 
ing held in reserve, where it was for three hours exposed 
to the fire of shot, shell and canister from the rebel bat- 
teries posted in a belt of woods. 

Early on the morning of the 16th the right wing of 
the regiment was advanced as skirmishers through an 
open field to the edge of a swamp, across which the 
enemy were strongly intrenched. Sharp skirmishing 
ensued, but with no decisive results, till about noon, 
when it was determined to storm the enemy's position. 
At the order, the Third with its brigade, charged on the 
line of the rebel works, which they carried, taking a 
large number of prisoners. From here another charge 
was made through an open field, and under a terrific 
fij-e from the enemy. This charge was repulsed, when 
three counter-charges were made by the rebels in the 
attempt to retake the first line, which were repulsed by 
the Union troops. The Third was afterward ordered to 



208 THE ORE AT REBELLION. 

retire. The loss of the regiment in this engageraen 
was very severe. Ten officers and eighty-three mei 
were killed, wounded or missing. Lieut, Col. Plimptoi 
was shot through the heart while leading the last charge 
Lieut. S. N. Lamprey was mortally wounded and diec 
in a few hours. Lieut. C. A. Wliite was wounded anc 
left on the field, but afterward returned to join in th( 
fight, and had hardly reached the regiment when a bul 
let struck his arm, passed through his lungs and ou 
at the left side — a distance of fifteen inches — ^notwith 
standing which he eventually recovered. Capt. Wadlis 
and Adjutant Copp were severely wounded. Lieuten 
ants Eldridge, Ackerman, Donley, Giddings and Ather 
ton were more or less severely wounded. Lieut. Athertoi 
was shot through the lungs, left on the field and reportec 
killed, but was taken prisoner of war, soon after paroled 
exchanged and rejoined his regiment. The behavior ol 
the regiment in this engagement was highly commendec 
oh all hands, and its record never stood better than a 
the close of this bloody battle. Seven days more, anc 
the term of enlistment of many of the men would have 
expired, yet they went in as cheerfully and fought as 
bravely as though they had a reputation to make foi 
themselves which would follow them through a lon^ 
campaign. Entering the fight with less than twc 
hundred men, it captured and took to the rear aboui 
three hundred prisoners, and sustained a loss of nearly 
one-half its entire strength. 

On the 20th of August the regiment returned to Ber- 
muda Hundred. The term of service of such of th( 
original members as had not re-enlisted expired on tht 
23d, and they were promptly mustered out and started 
on their way hom«, under command of Capt. K. "W, 
Houghton, and accompanied by Chaplain Hill, both wel 
beloved and honored officers, bearing with them, tat- 
tered, torn and pierced by many rebel balls, the beloved 



THIRD REGIMENT. 209 

colors presented them by the ladies of Hampstead, with- 
out a stain of dishonor upon it. 

On the 24th of August the Tenth Corps crossed the 
Appomattox, and went on duty in the trenches in front 
of Petersburg. The duty was severe and casualties of 
daily occurrence. It remained here until the 28th of 
September, when it crossed the James river, and the 
next day the Third participated in the advance' on Lau- 
rel Hill and Chapin's Farm; and the same afternoon 
took part in the reconnoissance to within two miles of 
Richmond, and in a similar movement on the 1st of 
October. Major Randlett, who had been absent on leave 
and on detached service, since he was wounded, joined 
the regiment the last of September. 

On the 7th of October the enemy made a vigorous at- 
tack on our lines, which the Third successfully repelled 
until their ammunition was exhaused, captured thirty 
prisoners and lost twenty-five killed and wounded. On 
the 13th, at Darbytown Road, a charge was ordered to 
be made by another brigade, and the Third was sent 
to support it. The brigade broke and fled, leaving the 
regiment alone, where it retained its position until or- 
dered to leave the field, and was withdrawn in good or- 
der, not a man falling from the ranks. On the 28th and 
29th another attempt was made to dislodge the enemy 
from Darbytown and Charles City Roads, in which the 
Third participa,ted, losing seventeen killed and wounded. 
Captain Trickey and Lieut. MbCoy were among the 
wounded. 

On the 2d of November the Third, with other regi- 
ments, embarked on steamers for l^ew York City to pre- 
serve order at the Presidential election there. When 
the election was over they returned to Bermuda 
Hundred, having been absent from the army seventeen 
days. On this expedition the men suffered severely 
from cold and hunger — the only food received being 



210 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

short rations of pork and liard~ bread. Major Eaudlett 
was promoted to Lieut. Colonel on the 12th of October, 
and Capt. Trickey to Major on the 4th of January, 1865. 

On the 15th of January, 1865, the Third Eegiment 
participated in the successful night assault upon Fort 
Fisher. The garrison flag was hauled down by Capt. 
Edgerly, of the Third, and given to Gen. Terry, and by 
him to the Secretary of "War. Shortly afterward a 
movement was made upon a rebel force three miles to 
the rear of Fort Fisher, in which the Third made a 
charge and captured about sixty prisoners. In these 
two battles the regiment lost four killed and ten 
wounded. Major Trickey commanded the regiment 
from the 20th of December, 1864, to the 17th of Feb- 
ruary, 1865, Lieut. Col. Randlett having been left at 
Laurel Hill with a portion of the regiment, but joined 
the main body at the latter date. 

On the 19th of February a movement was commenced 
on Wilmington. On the 22d, with the Third deployed 
as skirmishers, the army ehtered Wilmington, which 
had been abandoned by the enemy, and, having passed 
through the city, the Third kept up a running fight; 
drove the enemy across Smith's Creek; saved the 
bridge which the rebels had fired, and captured a pon- 
toon bridge at IsTorth East Ferry, ten miles from Wil- 
mington. Lieut. Col. Randlett was appointed provost 
marshal of Wilmington, and nearly half of the regiment 
was detailed as provost guard. The remainder were 
commanded by Major Trickey, until the return of Col. 
Bedel, April 11th, after his seventeen months of severe 
imprisonment. He was received by the men with many 
demonstrations of joy and respect. 

While at Wilmington Surgeon A. J. H. Buzzell died 
of disease, March 28th 1865. A writer said of him — 
" A nobler man never lived ; a christian and a patriot, 
devoted thoroughly to his duties, and ambitious to serve 



THIRD REGIMENT. 211 

the best interests of tbe cause. In his death the coun- 
try lost a true man and soldier, the regiment a noble 
benefactor. God bless his memory, will be the prayer 
of every soldier of the Third New Hampshire." 

In May a new stand of national colors was received 
from the State, on which was inscribed the names of 
the battles in which the regiment had been engaged. 
This was prized as an evidence of the gallantry, valor, 
and hard service of the regiment; but the love of the 
old flags, which had been proudly borne in the numer- 
ous battle fields, was still as strong as ever in the heart 
of every soldier who had followed and fought under 
their tattered and riddled folds. 

On the 3d of June Col. Bedel was ordered to proceed 
with the regiment, and occupy the post of Golds- 
borough, North Carolina. On the 10th and 11th the 
Sixth and Seventh Connecticut, and the Seventh New 
Hampshire Regiments arrived at the Post and reported 
to Col. Bedel, and he remained in command of the Post 
till the return of Brevet Brig. Gen. Abbott from New 
Hampshire, on the 5th of July. 

On the 20th of July, 1865, the regiment was mustered 
out of the service of the United States, and ordered to 
New Hampshire for final discharge and paj'ment. It 
arrived at Concord on the 28th, with twenty-six oflicers 
and three hundred and twenty-four men. Gov. Fred- 
erick Smyth, Adjutant General Natt Head, Col. Peter 
Sanborn, State Treasurer, and Gen. M. T. Donohoe, 
addressed the regiment in thrilling speeches, congratu- 
lating the survivors on their safe return, and paying a 
just tribute to the memory of the many gallant officers 
and men who had sacrificed their lives in their country's 
cause. Col. Bedel — appointed Brig. Gen. TJ. S. "Volun- 
teers by brevet, July 22d, " for gallant and meritorious 
service, to rank as such from March 13, 1865" — and 
Lieut. Col. Eandlett responded for the regiment. The 



212 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

dags were then returned to the Governor, and the regi'- 
ment, after having partaken of a bountiful repast, gen-- 
erously supplied, marched to the camp ground south of 
the city, where the enlisted men were discharged and 
paid off on the 2d of August, and the officers on the 3d 
and 4th, and the Third ISTew Hampshire Eegiment of 
Volunteers, equally distinguished for its orderly and 
soldierly conduct in its final discharged, as for gallantry 
and valor in its many hard fought battles, ceased to ex- 
ist except in the pages of history. 

During the four years' service on the Atlantic coast 
in the States of South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Vir- 
ginia and I^orth Carolina, the Third Eegiment was en- 
gaged in the following sieges, battles, reconnoissances, 
skirmishes, &c. : 



1. 


Port Eoyal Harbor, S 


3. C. 




November 7, 1861. 


2. 


Elba Island, Ga. 






March 7, 1862. 


3. 


Bluffton, S. C. 






March 16, 1862. 


4. 


Jehossee, S. C. 




April 


10, 14 and 17, 1862. 


5. 


James Island, S. 0. 






June 8, 1862. 


6. 


Secessionville, S. C. 






June 16, 1862. 


7. 


Pocotaligo, S. C. 






October 22, 1862. 


8. 


May Eiver, Fla. 






January 7, 1863. 


9. 


Stono Inlet, S. C. 






April 7, 1863. 


10. 


Morris Island, S. C. 






July 10, 1863. 


11. 


Fort Wagner, S. C. 






July 18, 1863. 


12. 


Siege of Wagner, S. 


C. 


July 


18 to Sept. 7, 1863. 


13. 


Siege of Sumter, S. C, 


. Sept. 7, 1863, to March 1, 1864. 


14. 


Pilatka, Fla. 






April 3, 1864. 


15. 


Chester Station, Va. 






May 9, 1864. 


16. 


Drury's Bluff, Va. 






May 13 to 16, 1864. 


17. 


Bermunda Hundred, 


Va. 




May 18, 1864. 


18. 


Wier Bottom Churcl 


L, Va, 




June 2, 1864. 


19. 


Petersburg, Va. 






June 9, 1864. 


20. 


Hatcher's Eun, Va. 






June 16, 1864. 



THIRD REGIMENT. 213 

21. Flussell's Mills, Va. August 16, 1864. 

22. Siege of Petersburg, Va. Aug. 24, to Sept. 29, 1864. 

23. New Market Heights, Va. September 29, 1864. 

24. Demon'tion towards R'd. Sept. 29, and Oct. 1, 1864. 

25. New Market Eoad, Va. October 7, 1864. 

26. Darbytown Eoad, Va. October 13, 1864. 

27. Charles City Road, Va. October 27, 1864. 

28. Fort Fisher, K C. January 15, 1865. 

29. Sugar Loaf Hill, K C. February 11, 1865. 

30. "Wilmington, Smith's Creek, and North 

East Ferry. February 22, 1865. 

During its term of service the regiment had on its 
rolls 1717 enlisted men, including 44 non-commissioned 
staff and band, and 101 officers, making an aggregate 
of 1818. Of these 190 were killed in battle or died of 
wounds; 137 died of disease; 196 — nearly all substi- 
tutes — deserted ; 740 discharged — 300 by expiration of 
term and 440 by reason of disability, &c.; 62 trans- 
ferred; 6 rejected; 2 dismissed; 3 shot for desertion; 
6 missing in action, and not known whether killed, pris- 
oners, or deserters. Two hundred and seventy of the 
regiment re-enlisted in January and February, 1864, 
and are taken into account but once in the aggregate 
of 1818. The casualties in wounded and prisoners were 
487 wounded and 91 prisoners. Nearly all the prisoners 
taken subsequent to the surprise and capture of Com- 
pany H, on Pinkney Island, August 21, 1862, lan- 
guished and died of starvation in southern prisons. 

An officer of the regiment wrote — " To the excellent 
corps of Surgeons and Assistant Surgeons attached to- 
the regiment, from its organization to its disbandment, 
may be attributed the small number of deaths in the 
regiment. Their moral and temperate habits, their in- 
tegrity as gentlemen, their skill as Surgeons, and faith- 
ful and prompt attention to duty, rendered them 



214 THE OBEAT REBELLION. 

conspicuous. This was particularly the case witli Sur- 
geons Buzzell and Kimball, than whom no better Sur- 
geons belonged to the army." 

The roll of honor comprises officers killed in battle 
and died of wounds, as follows : Lieut. Col. Plimpton ; 
Captains Carlton, Ela and Ater; Adjutant Libbt; 
First Lieutenants Button and Lamprey; Second Lieu- 
tenants ScRUTON, WiGSiN, RoBiNSON, Trbdick and Mor- 
rill. Died of disease — Surgeon Buzzell, First Lieu- 
tenant Thompson, and Second Lieutenant Bryant. 



FOURTH REGIMENT. 215 

FOURTH REGIMENT. 



The Fourtli Regiment rendezvoused at Manchester. 
After the organization of the Third there were two hun- 
dred men left in camp at Concord, who were sent to 
Manchester as the nucleus of the Eourth Eegiment. 
The full number of men required was speedily enlisted, 
sent to rendezvous, and the regiment was mustered into 
the United States service on the 18th of September, 
1861. Company A was enlisted at Dover, Company B 
at Nashua, Company D at Laconia, Company F at 
Great Falls, Company H at Salem, and Companies C, 
E, G, I and K at Manchester, though many of the men 
were from other towns in the State than those named. 
The following were the field, staff and company officers, 
with their record, from the organization to the mus- 
ter out of the regiment: 

FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS. 



Colonels — Thomas J. "Whipple, of Laconia. 

Resigned March 18, 1862. 

Louis Bell, of Farmington. 

Killed at Fort Fisher, N. C, Jan. 15, 1865. 

Lieut. Colonels — ^Louis Bell, of Farmington. 

Promoted to Colonel, May 16, 1862. 

Gilman E. Sleeper, of Salem. 

Discharged Not. 27, 1863. 
Jeremiah D. Drew, of Salem. 

Discharged for disability Sept. 17, 1864. 

-Frank "W. Parker, of Manchester. 

Mastered oat Aug. 23, 1865. 

Majors — Jeremiah D. Drew, of Salem. 

Promoted to Lieut. Colonel, Deo. 1, 1868. 



216 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

Charles "W. Sawyer, of Dover. 

Wounded May 16, 1864. Died of wounds June 22, 1864. 

George F. Towle, of Portsmouth. 

Mustered cut August 28, 1865. 

Adjutants — Henry "W. Fuller, of Concord. 

Resigned October 29, 1862. 

Charles A. Carlton, of Concord. 

Promoted to A. A. Gen. Vols. July 18, 1864.. 

Timothy "W. Challis, of Laconia. 

Mustered out August 28, 1865. 

Quartermasters — John L. Kelley, of Manchester. 

Promoted to A. Q. M., U. S. Vols. July 30, 1868. 

Albert K. Tilton, of Concord. 

Mustered out May 15, 1865. 

Surgeons — Josiah C. Eastman, of Hampstead. 

Resigned October 7, 1862. 

George P. Greely, of Ifashua. 

^ Honorably discharged October 28, 1864. 

David P. Dearborn, of Weare. 

Mustered out August 28, 1865. 

First Ass't Surgeons — George P. Greeley, of Nashua. 

Promoted to Surgeon October 8, 1862. 

David L. M. Comings, of Swanzey. 

Died of disease at Swanzey, August 1, 1863. 

Charled C. BecHey, of Plainfield. 

Honorably discharged March 26, 1864. 

David p. Dearborn, of Weare. 

Promoted to Surgeon Nov. 9. 1864. 

Second Ass't Surgeon — ^D. L. M. Comings, of Swanzey. 

Promoted to First .Ass't Surgeon, Oct. 8, 1862. 

David P. Dearborn, of "Weare. 

Promoted to First Ass't Surgeon, May 2, 1864. 

James P. "Walker. 

Discharged for disability, Nov. 2, 1864. 

Henry F. Wardwell, of Gorham. 

Mustered out August 23, 1865. 

Chaplains — Martin "W. "Willis, of Nashua. 

Discharged for disability Jan. 27, 1862. 

Liberty Billings, of Concord. 

Promoted to Lieut. Colonel U. S. C. T. Nov. 4, 1862. 

William .H. Thomas, of Laconia. 

Honorably discharged June 28, 1864. 

Sergeant Majors — Charles L. Brown, of Manchester. 

'•romoted to Second Lieut. March 22, 1862. 



FOURTH REGIMENT 217 

William B. Stearns, of Amherst. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. March 14, 1863. 
William Smith. 
B«-enlisted Feb. 15, 1864. Captured at Deep Run, Va., Aug. 16, 1864. 
Paroled Feb. 24, 1865. Mustered out June 10, 1865. 

Charles H. Smithford, of Salem. 

Mustered out August 23, 1865. 

Quartermaster Sergeants — Charles J. Kelley. 

Discharged for disability Dec. 1, 1862. 
Volney Piper, of Richmond. 

Discharged for disability May 9, 1863. 
William K. Norton, of Concord. 
Re-enlisted Feb. 20, 1864. Promoted to First Lieut. Nov. 21, 1864. 
Charles H. Moore, of Nashua. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Feb. 17, 1865. 

Edward P. Hall, of Groton. 

Mustered out Aug. 23, 1865. 

Commissary Sergeants — Albert K. Till^n, of Concord. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. Aug. 15, 1862. 
John C. Difkerman. 

Died at Polly Island, S. C. Aug. 1, 1863. 

Benjamin F. Fogg, of Manchester. 
Ee-enlisted Feb. 18, 1864. Promoted to Second Lieut. March 1, 1865. 

Lewis H. Cheney, of Canterbury. 

Mustered out August 23, 1865 

Hospital Stewards — ^Israel T. Hunt. 

Discharged for disability July 12, 186Z 

William H. Piper, of Concord. 

Wounded Jan. 16, 1865. Mustered out August 23, 1865. 

Principal Musicians — ^Francis H. Pike, of Manchester. 

Mustered out Sept. 16, 1862. 

Henry J. White. 

Discharged for disability July 12, 1862. 

Elias H. Bryant, of Francestown. 

Mustered out October 10,^864 

Jacob E. W. Aspiriwall, of Dover. 

Mustered out August 23, 1865. 

Albert T. Kent, of Concord. 

Mustered out August 23, 1865. 
COMPANY OFFICERS. 

Co. A. — Captains — Charles W. Sawyer, of Dover. 

Promoted to Major Dec. 1, 1863. 



218 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

Isaac "W". Hobbs, of Great Falls. 

Wounded July 18, 1864. Mustered out Nov. 7, 1864 

Matthew Adams, of New London. 

Mustered out August 23, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Joseph G-. "Wallace, of Dover. 

iTomoted to Captain May 17, 1862. 

Henry "W. Locke, of Rochester. 

Promoted to Captain C. S. U, S. Vols. June 25, 1864. 

Timothy W. Challis, of Laconia. 

Promoted to Adjutant Nov. 9, 1864. 

Louis McD. Hussy, of Rochester. 

Promoted to Captain Feb. 17, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — Henry "W. Locke, of Rochester. 

Promoted to First Lieut. May 17, 1862. 

Amos L. Colburn, of Concord. 

Transferred to Co. G Nov. 5, 1862. 

Albert H. C. Jewett, of Gilford. 

Promoted to First Lieut. March 14, 1864. 

Henry S. "Willey, of Farmington. 

Discharged foE.disability Dec. 14, 1864. 

Stephen T. Hall, of Dover. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Aug. 23, 1865. 

Co. B. — Captains — ^Richard 0. Greenleaf, of E'ashua. 

Mustered out Sept. 17, 1864. 

Frederick A. Kendall, of Concord. 

Honorably discharged Aug. 17, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — George F. Towle, of Portsmouth. 

Promoted to Captain Jan. 17, 1862. 
Charles A. Carlton, of Concord. 

Promoted to Adjutant Nov. 2, 1862. 

Frederick A. Kendall, of Concord. 

Promoted to Captain Sept. 12, 1864. 
Benjamin R. Wheeler, of Salem. 

Promoted to Captain Nov 9, 1864. 

Leonard A. Gay, of Nashua. 

Promoted to Captain Aug. 23, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — Charles A. Carlton, of Concord. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Jan. 17, 1862. 

Adelbert White, of Nashua. 

Cashiered Nov. 30, 1862. 

John W. Brewster, of Portsmouth. 

Wounded Maj 20, 1864. Discharged for disability Sept, 14, 1864. 

Co. C— Captains- -Gilman E. Sleeper, of Salem. 

Promoted to Lieut. Colonel May 16, 1862. 



FO UB TS REGIMENT. 219 

Joseph G. "Wallace, of Dover. 

Wounded severely Oct 22, 1862. Wounded May 15, 1864. Discharged 
for disabUity Sept. 14, 1864. 

George "W". Huckins, of Mancliester. 

Transferred to Co. K. 

Louis McD. Hussy, of Rochester. 

Mustered out Aug. 23, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — M. V. B. Richardson, of Manchester. 

Mustered out Sept. 17, 1864. 
"William K. Norton, of Concord. 

Mustered out Aug. 23, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — ^Fred. A. Kendall, of Concord. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Aug. 15, 1862. 

Albert K. Tilton, of Concord. 

Promoted to Quartermaster, Aug. 1, 1863. 

William D. Stearns, of Amherst. 

Wounded May 20, 1864. Discharged for disability Sept 14, 1864. 

Patrick K. Dowd, of Manchester. 

Promoted to First Lieut June 2, 1865. 

Co. D. — Captains — "William Badger, of Laconia. 

Cashiered June 4, 1864. Disability resulting from dismissal removed Jan. 
21, 1865, by G. C. M., orders No. 20. 

John H. Roberts, of Dover. 

Mustered out Aug. 23, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Chas. O. Jennison, of Manchester. 

Resigned April 30, 1862. 

David O. Burleigh, of Laconia. 

Promoted to Captain Oct 7, 1862. 

John H. Roberts, of Dover. 

Promoteito Captain Nov. 9, 1864. 

George "W. Quimbjj of Kingston. 

Promoted to Captain Feb. 17, 1865. 

Samuel H. Prescott, of ^Gilford. 

Mustered out August 28, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — ^David 0. Burleigh, of Laconia. 

, Promoted to First Lieut May 1, 1862. 

John H. Roberts, of Dover. 

Promoted to First Lieut Oct 7, 1862. 

Timothy W. Challis, of Laconia. 

Promoted to First Lieut July 27, 1864. 

Henry A. Mann, of Pembroke. 

Promoted to First Lieut June 2, 1865. 

Co. E. — Captains — Thompson L. Newell, of Manchester. 

Resigned Deo. 16, 1862. 



220 THE QBE AT REBELLION., 

Frank W. Parker, of Manchester. 

Wounded Aug. 16, 1864. Promoted to Lieut. Colonel Jan. 3, 1865. 
William S. Barker, of Londonderry. 
Discharged by special order No. 291, War Department, Adjt. Gen.'s office, 
Washington, D. C, May 30, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Frank W. Parker, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Captain Jan. 17, 1862. 

Andrew J. Edgerly, of Manchester. 
Dismissed by special order No. 119, par. 34, War Department, Adjutant 
General's office, Washington, March 13, 1863. 

Albert H. C. Jewett, of Gilford. 

Mustered out Sept. 26, 1864. 

Charles M. Whitney, of Manchester. 

Promote to Captain Aug. 23, 1866. 

Second Lieuts. — ^A. J. Edgerly, of Manchester. 

Promoted to First Lieut. January 17,' 1862. 

Harvey F. Wiggin, of Dover. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Oct. 25, 1862. 

Robert A. Seaver, of Manchester. 

Besigned Jan. 24, 1863. 

Frank B. Hutchinson, of Manchester. 

Killed at Drury's Bluff, Va., May 15, 1864. 

Oo. F. — Captains — Orrin Brown, of Great Falls. 

Cashiered Jan. 24, 1862. 

George F. Towle, of Portsmouth. 

Promoted to Major Jan. 3, 1865. 

Clarence L. Chapman, of Somersworth. 

Honorably discharged May 17, 1865. 

Eleazer L. Sarsons, of Nashua. 

Mustered out Aug. 23, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Isaac W. Hobbs, of Great Falls. 

Promoted to Captain Dec. 1, 1863. 

Amos L. Colburn, of Concord. 

Wounded Aug. 16, 1864. Discharged on account of wounds Nov. 1, 1864. 

Clarence L. Chapman, of Somersworth. , 

Promoted to Captain Feb. 17, 1865. 

Charles H. Moore, of Nashua. 

Honorably discWged May 15, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — Charles H. Drummer, of Keene. 

Resigned March 31, 1862. 

Charles L. Brown, of Manchester. 

Transferred to Co. I March 22, 1862. 

Benjamin R. Wheeler, of Salem. 
Wounded May 16, 1864. Promoted to First Lieut. Sept. 12, 1864. 



FOURTH BEaiMENT. 221 

Benjamin F. Fogg, of Manchester. 

Promoted to First Lieut June 2, 1865. 

Co. G. — Captains — Michael 0. Flynn, of Manchester. 

Resigned Oct. 2, 1862. 

William "W. Mayne, of Manchester. 
Wounded severely Oct. 22, 1862. Dismissed Jan. 4, 1864. Reinstated Feb. 
10, 1864. Discharged for disabiUty Sept. 14, 1864. 

Edward Whitford, of Bedford. 

Mustered «ut Aug. 23, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Charles "W. Hurd, of Manchester. 

Resigned March 21, 1862. 

William W. Mayne, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Captain Oct. 3, 1862. 

Daniel Gile, of Manchester. 
Captured at Deep Run, Va., Aug. 18, 1864. Paroled. Honorably dis- 
charged April 28, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — ^Wm. W. Mayne, of Manchester. 
Promoted to First Lieut. March 22, 1862. 

David P. Dearhorn, of Weare. 

Resigned Not. 4, 1862. 

Amos L. Colburn, of Concord. 

Transferred to Co. K. 

James F. Gilpatrick, of Nashua. 

Mustered out Aug 23, 1865. 

Co. H.-^Captains — Joseph M. Clough, of New London. 
Wounded July 30, 1864. Mustered out Sept. 17, 1864. 

Abner L. Knowlton, of Sanboriiton. 

Mustered out Aug. 23, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Israel L. Drew, pf Lawrence, Ms. 
Died at Annapolis, Md., ^0T. 4, 1861. 

Hiram C. Tuttlfe, of Concord. 

Died at Concord, Feb. 7, 1863. 

Henry M. Hicks, of Haverhill. 

Honorably discharged Sept. 14, 1864. 
Abner L. Knowlton, of Sanbornton. 

Promoted to Captain Feb. 17, 1865. 

Alfred Marland, of Haver-de-Grace, Md. 

Mustered out Aug. 23, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — Hiram C. Tuttle, of Concord. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Jan. 17, 1862. 

Norman Burdick, of Milford. 

Discharged Not. 12, 1862. 

Henry M. Hicks, of Haverhill. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Feb. 8, 1863. 



222 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

Matthew Adams, of liTew London. 

Wounded July 30, 1864. Promoted to Captain Nov. 21, 1864. 

John FuUerton, of Bedford. 

Mustered out Aug. 23, 1865. 

Co. I.— Captains— Nathan H. Brown, of Derry. 

^ Besigned Oct. 6, 1862 

David 0. Burleigh, of Loconia. 

Cashiered June' 4, 1864. 

Georffe F. Quimby, of Kingston. 

Mustered out Aug. 23, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — W. S. Pillsbury, of Londonderry. 

Resigned Oct. 20, 1861. 

Daniel Q. Cole, of Concord. 

Resigned Oct. 24, 1862. 

Henry F. Wiggin, of Dover. 

Promoted to Adjutant Sept. 12, 1864. 

Edwin Whitford, of Bedford. 

Promoted to Captain March 1, 1865. 

Lorenzo D. Huntress, of Effingham. 

Mustered out Aug. 23, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — True Sanborn, Jr., of Chichester. 

.Promoted to First Lieut. June 12, 1862. 

Benjamin E,. Wheeler, of Salem. 

Transferred to Co. F June 12, 1862. 

Charles L. Brown, of Manchester. 

Died of disease at Folly Island, S. C, June 3, 1863. 

Francis H. Davis, of Laconia. 
Wounded May 16, 1864. Promoted to First Lieut. Nov. 9, 1864. 

Eben Weed, of Haverhill. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Aug. 23, 1865. 

Co. K. -Captains — Jonathan E.. Bagley, of Manchester. 

Resigned Jan. 13, 1862. 

Ephraim C. Currier, of Danville. 

Died at Beaufort, S. C, Aug. 12, 1862 

True Sanborn, Jr., of Chichester. 

Discharged for disability Nov. 2, 1864. 

George W. Huckins, of Manchester. 

Mustered out Aug. 23, 1868. 

First Lieuts. — ^Ephraim C. Currier, of Danville. 

Promoted to Captain Jan. 17, 1862. 
Charles M. Currier, of Manchester. 

Resigned June 11, 1862. 

True Sanborn, Jr., of Chichester. 

Promoted to Captain Aug. 15, 1862. 



FOXJRTS REGIMENT. 223 

George "W". Huckins, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Captain Not. 9, 1864. 

William S. Barker, of Londonderry. 

Promoted to gaptain Feb. 17, 1865. 

Joseph Wingate, of Rochester. 

Mustered out Aug. 23. 1865. 

Second Lieut. — Charles N. Tilton, of Sanhornton. 

Resigned Jan. 16, 1862. 

George W. Huckins, of Manchester. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Oct 25, 1862. 

Amos L. Colburn, of Concord. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Dec. 1, 1863. 

Stephen J. TVentworth, of Somersworth. 
Wounded June 6, 188,4. Killed at Deep Run, Va., Aug. 16, 1864. 

All the Field and several of the Company officers in 
the Fourth were officers in the First Regiment, and had 
knowledge of the duties required of them. Col. Whip- 
ple was Lieut. Colonel of the First, and also held a 
commission in the Mexican war. Lieut. Colonel Bell, 
Major Drew, Quartermaster Kelley, Capt. Greenleaf, 
and Capt. Sleeper were Captains in the First Regiment, 
and many of the other officers and soldiers had served 
three months in that regiment. 

COL. THOMAS J. WHIPPLE. 

Col. Whijjjjle was born at Wentworth on the 30th of 
January, 1816, and is a son of Dr. Thomas Whipple, of 
that town. He graduated at the military University at 
Norwich, Vermont, under the instruction of Col. Ran- 
som, who was killed in the Mexican War. He read law 
with Hon. Josiah Quincy, of Rumney, and after being 
admitted to the bar commenced practice at Meredith, 
now Laconia. In April, 1847, he was appointed First 
Lieutenant in the Ninth United States Infantry, and 
Adjutant of the same regiment in May following. He 
went with his regiment to Vera Cruz, and while on a 
visit to a Catholic cemetery in the neighborhood of the 



224 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

city, in company with private R. H. A. Barnes, of Mb 
regiment, was taken prisoner. When Lieut. Whipple 
and his companion came to the gate of the cemetery 
they were confronted by three Mexicans, who had dis- 
mounted from their horses, with their guns pointed at 
them. Lieut. Whipple was armed with a sword, and 
placed himself at once against the wall, and prepared 
for a defense. Barnes, who was unarmed, made the 
best of his way through the cemetery to the camp. 
The Mexicans made at Whipple, who stoutly defended 
himself. One of them hit him a blow upon the head, 
which stunned but did not injure Mm, as the blow, meet- 
ing a parry, struck flatwise upon Whipple's head. Re- 
covering himself he went at his antagonists again, when 
they retreated a few paces and brought their gun's to 
bear upon him, indicating by signs, which Lieut. Whip- 
ple well understood, that if he did not surrender they 
would fire. He finally surrendered, and was taken 
away upon a mustang, while his own horse was appro- 
priated by one of his captors. Barnes on reaching camp 
gave the alarm, and a detachment was sent out in search 
of Whipple, but the guerillas had escaped with their 
captive. He was a prisoner several months and was 
kindly treated. He was subsequently exchanged, join- 
ed his regiment, and distinguished himself at Atlixco, 
where he was volunteer Aid-de-camp to Brig. Gen. 
Lane. Adjutant Whipple resigned in February, 1848, 
and resumed the practice of law at Laconia. 

Col. Whipple was assistant clerk of the New Hamp- 
shire House of Representatives in 1848, and clerk in 
1849, '50, '61, and 52. In 1849 he was appointed Solic- 
itor for Belknap County, which office he held four years. 
When the war of the rebellion broke out, in April 1861, 
Col. Whipple was appointed Lieut. Colonel of the 
First Regiment,,.and his military knowledge, acquired 
both at Norwich, Yt., and in the Mexican war, was of 



FOUNTS REQIMENT. 225 

great service in organizing and disciplining tlie regi- 
ment. He was mustered out with his regiment, at the 
end of its term of enlistment, August 9, 1861. On 
the 20th. of the same month he was appointed Colonel 
of the Eourth Regiment, and resigned in March, 1862. 
His courage and patriotism as an officer were never called 
in question. He is now engaged in an extensive law 
practice at Laconia, and in the cultivation of a fine 
farm. He is a gentleman of marked ability as an advo- 
cate, is eminently social and genial, and has many 
warm friends. 

GEN. LOUIS BELL, 

Louis Bell was the youngest son of the late Gov. 
Samuel Bell, and was born in Chester, March 8th, 1837. 
Among his older brothers were Dr. Luther V. Bell, long 
at the head of the McLean Asylum for the Insane, at 
Somerville, Mass., Hon. James Bell, a distinguished 
lawyer and United States Senator, and Hon. Samuel 
D. Bell, Chief Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court. 

After completing his preparatory studies at Derry 
and at Gilford, he entered Brown University, at Provi- 
dence, R. L, where he graduated at the age of eighteen 
years. His taste and aptitude for athletic and martial 
exercises had made him desirous of an appointment to 
the Military Academy at West Point, and, at a later 
period, of a commission in the army ; but circumstan- 
ces prevented the accomplishment of either of these 
wishes. The same inclination, however, led him to di- 
rect his reading and study largely to military subjects, 
a circumstance which was of great advantage to him in 
Ms subsequent career. 

He then prepared himself for the legal profession, 
and was admitted to the bar in 1857, establishing himself 
in Farmington. His ability and high personal charac- 



226 THE &REAT REBELLION 

ter at once secured him friends and clients. In 1859 he 
received the appointment of Justice of the Police Court 
of Farmington, and two yeai^s later, that of Solicitor of 
the County of Strafford. 

The breaking out of the rebellion found Mr. Bell 
married, and fairly established in business, with the 
most flattering professional prospects for the future. 
But President Lincoln's call for volunteers in April, 1861, 
was an appeal to his patriotism and military spirit which 
was irresistible. He immediately offered his services to 
Gov. Goodwin, and was appointed Captain of Company 
A in the First Kegiment of I^ew Hampshire Volunteers. 
The organization was rapidly completed, and the regi- 
ment leaving Concord May 25, 1861, proceeded directly 
to Washington. During their three months' term of 
service they were stationed on the line of the Potomac, 
above Washington, and engaged chiefly in picket duty, 
a service sufficiently responsible and trying, but afford- 
ing few incidents worthy of special mention. Capt. 
Bell discharged his duties faithfully and creditably, and 
returned with the regiment to 'Sew Hampshire, thor- 
oughly acquainted with the practical part of a soldier's 
life, "and having gained the respect and efeteem of offi- 
cers and men. 

The Fourth E"ew Hampshire Regiment was then about 
being formed, and Capt. Bell was immediately commis- 
sioned as its Lieutenant Colonel. On the 27th of Septem- 
ber, 1861, that regiment left the State, and constituted a 
part of the expedition against Port Royal and Beaufort, 
S. C. At the latter post Gen. T. W. Sherman was in 
command. He was struck vrith the efficiency and sol- 
dierly qualities of Lieut. Col. Bell, and made him his 
Inspector General and chief of staff. This place he 
continued to hold, to the General's entire satisfaction, 
during the whole period of Sherman's stay in the 
department. 



FO U£ TH BEOIMENT. 227 

In the discharge of this duty, he was in December 
sent by Gen. Sherman, in a light steamer, to make a 
reconnoissance around Port Eoyal Island. He succeeded 
in unearthing a concealed rebel battery, which opened 
fire upon the steamer, with the effect of slightly wound- 
ing Col. Bell and one of his men. 

Upon the resignation of Col. "Whipple, Col. Bell suc- 
ceeded in March, 1862, to the command of the Fourth 
Regiment. In April he was ordered with seven compa- 
nies to occupy the fortified town of St. Augustine, Flo- 
rida. His administration of affairs there was extremely 
judicious and_ eflS.cient. The position being much ex- 
posed, its works were put into a thoroughly defensible 
condition; the troops were admirably organized and 
trained, and the civil government of the town was con- 
ducted in a manner completely satisfactory. 

In October, 1862, Col. Bell again united his command 
at Beaufort, to join the expedition designed to cut the 
railroad between Charleston and Savannah, at the Poco- 
taligo river. Although the Fourth Regiment had in 
detachments seen some skirmishing, this was their first 
appearance as an organization in any serious engage- 
ment, but they acquitted themselves with much credit, 
and acted as rear-guard on the retreat. Their loss was 
about thirty men, killed and wounded. Col. Bell, who 
led his men gallantly, was here again slightly wounded 
by a splinter from a shell. 

In the Spring of 1863 began the series of operations 
against Charleston and its defenses. The Fourth Regi- 
ment was employed the greater part of the summer on 
engineer duty, in working among the hot sands of Folly 
and Morris Islands. Here Col. Bell had an opportunity 
to put in practice some of the knowledge which he had 
acquired years before, while intending to enter the mili- 
tary profession. He experimented, with a good degree 
of success, in the preparation of a new shell-fuse, de- 



228 TSE QBE AT REBELLION. 

signed to obviate some of the difficulties experienced in 
mortar practice, and of a "Greek fire," to be conveyed 
in shells for the purpose of producing conflagrations. 

In April, 1864, Col. Bell was ordered with his regi- 
ment, to report to Gen. Butler, to join the Army of the 
James. He was placed in command of a brigade, 
consisting of the Fourth New Hampshire, Thirteenth 
Indiana, Ninth Maine, One Hundred Seventeenth New 
York, and Ninety-seventh Pennsylvania Eegiments, 
with which he took part in the affair at Swift Creek, in 
the severe engagement at Drury's Bluff, and in the 
series of struggles on the 17th, 20th and 21st of May, 
He also held the left of the line in the battle at Cold 
Harbor, and, after the subsequent flank movement, led 
his brigade to the assault of two of the forts before 
Petersburg, which he carried in handsome style, being 
himself among the first to enter the works. 

He was also engaged with his command in 'the unfor- 
tunate "Mine" assault, and conducted himself, so well 
that he was one of the few general officers concerned 
who escaped without censure, in the report of the 
Board that investigated the affair. 

Of both the expeditions against Fort Fisher, Col. 
Bell's brigade formed a part. "When Gen. Terry was 
selected to undertake the second, it was clear to every 
mind that there was to be no failure, whatever the cost 
of success. 

In the final assault upon the works, now strengthened 
in every possible way, and defended with desperation. 
Col. Bell's brigade formed the third line of attack. At 
the signal for their advance, they pushed forward in 
admirable order, their leader, as was his custom, at 
their head, into the storm of fire. The Colonel had just 
congratulated a brother officer on the splendid behavior 
of the men, as they reached the ditch in front of the 
work, and a bullet from the rifle of a sharpshooter, on 



FOURTE REGIMENT. 229 

the crest of the parapet above them, struck him in the 
left breast and passed downward through his body. 
He fell, mortally wounded, and was tenderly borne by 
his comrades to the' rear. But he would not leave the 
field till he could see the colors of his regiment i»pon 
the fort, and it was but a moment before his dying 
wish was gratified, and the tattered ensign of the Fourth 
was planted upon the ramparts of the captured strong- 
hold. 

"With the going down of the sun his life ebbed away, 
and the morning saw the spirit of the loj^al, chivalrous 
and accomplished soldier winging its flight from earth. 

On the day after the costly purchase of the national 
triumph, the Secretary of War arrived at Fort Fisher. 
By command of President Lincoln, he conferred upon 
Col. Bell the brevet rank of Brigadier General, dating 
from January 15th, the day when he received his fatal 
wound. 

Such is a brief sketch of the career of one of the 
noblest men who laid his life upon the altar of his 
country. Strictly conscientious in the performance of 
duty, thoroughly skilled in every detail of his position, 
tenderly solicitous for the safety and comfort of his men, 
and sharing every hardship and danger with them, hon- 
orable, patriotic and eminent for prudence, coolness and 
courage, he was universally beloved and respected. 

The Fourth Regiment left Manchester for "Washing- 
ton, D. C, on the 27th of September, receiving the 
customary hospitalities and attentions on the way, and 
arrived there on the 30th. They went into camp on the 
Bladensburg road, about a mile and a half from the 
city, immediately after which they were armed with 
Belgium rifles, and were at once put to drilling. The 
regiment remained here until the 9th of October, when 
they started to join Gen. Sherman's Expeditionary 



230 TEE QREAT REBELLION. 

Corps, at Annapolis, Md., where they arrived the same 
day. The regiment was brigaded with the Sixth and 
Seventh Connecticut, and Ninth Maine, under command 
of Brig. G-en. H. G-. Wright, who was subsequently the 
popular commander of the Sixth Army Corps. 

On the 19th the regiment embarked on board the 
steamer Baltic, and in company with the rest of the 
expedition, sailed for Fortress Monroe, where it remain- 
ed until the 29th, awaiting the preparation of the Navy, 
when the whole land and naval forces sailed under 
orders, the import of which was known only to the com- 
mander of the expedition. The Baltic had in tow the 
ship Ocean Express, loaded with ammunition 'and ord- 
nance. On the 30th the wind became strong and the 
sea rough, which threatened danger to the less staunch 
vessels of the fleet. About two o'clock the next morn- 
ing the Baltic struck on Frying Pan Shoals with a tre- 
mendous crash. For a time there was imminent danger 
of a complete shipwreck, and the wildest excitement 
prevailed on board the Baltic. The steamer was finally 
relieved from her perilous condition, when a terrible 
gale ensued, which continued three days. On arrival at 
Port Eoyal, on the 4th of November, where the rest of 
the fleet had assembled, it was ascertained that the 
vessels Commodore Perry and Governor had been lost, 
though every person on board had been almost miracu- 
lously saved. The Baltic was ordered to put to sea, 
and cruise about to find the Ocean Express, which was 
cut loose from the Baltic when she struck upon Frying 
Pan Shoals. She returned the next day, after an unsuc- 
cessful search. During the storm the steamer Union 
had been driven ashore, and Quartermaster Sergeant 
Kelley, of the Fourth, with a squad of men, and the 
crew of the steamer, were made prisoners. 

On the morning of the 7th of November the gunboats 
commenced an attack on the rebel works at Hilton 



FO UB TH BEGIMENT. 231 

Head, and the "Wabash, Pawnee and Sabine opened 
their terrible broadsides on the enemy's batteries. For 
five hours about one shell per second fell upon each of 
the forts. Fifteen thousand men clustered in the rig- 
ging and around the masts of the transports, to witness 
the grand spectacle. The fleet gradually neared the 
shore, and the rebel gunners replied but feebly and at 
intervals. At two o'clock no response was received 
from tbe forts. The rebels left their intrenchments, 
and an hour later the stars and stripes superseded the 
rebel flag on the parapet, while the troops and sailors 
rent the air with their cheers. After nineteen days of 
confinement on shipboard, the Fourth went ashore at 
Hilton Head. The victory of the Navy was complete 
and glorious, with but very small loss, l^ineteen can- 
non were captured and an important post had been 
taken. 

The Fourth passed three months at Hilton Head, a1 
work on fortifications, erecting wharves and landing 
stores, drilling only at intervals. At inspection one day 
Col. "Wbipple rebuked a soldier for having a dirty gun. 
" I know my gun is dirty," replied the man, " but I've 
got the brightest shovel you ever saw, Colonel." The 
soldier's wit /aaved him from punishment. Tbe arduous 
duties performed, together with the change of climate, 
told upon the health of the men, and funerals were of 
daily occurrence. 

Early in January, 1862, the Chaplain, M. "W. Willis, 
was discharged on account of ill health. On the 21st, 
the Fourth, with other regiments, sailed from Hilton 
Head on an expedition down the coast. They came 
to an anchorage at Warsaw Sound, Georgia, and the 
troops were landed on Warsaw Island, a marshy, un- 
healthy spot, and remained on shore and on board, 
awaiting the arrival of the navy, until 'the 28th of Feb- 
ruary, when the exnedition started again, and the next 



232 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

day arrived within twelve miles of Fernandina, Florida. 
On the 2d of March it was ascertained that the rebels 
had evacuated the place, and Fernandina and Bruns- 
wick were occupied by our troops, the Fourth being 
encamped in the town. 

On the 8th of March the regiment, except Companies 
E and F, which were left at Fernandina, under com- 
mand of Capt. Towle, as a provost ^uard, embarked on 
the steamer Boston, and in company with six gunboats 
proceeded down the coast and anchored for the night. 
The -next morning the soldiers were distributed among 
the gunboats as sharpshooters. One boat crossed the 
bar and found that the batteries commanding the en- 
trance to the river, which, with those further up, were 
very strong, had been evacuated — the enemy leaving 
their guns and every thing in perfect order, without 
having fired a shot. The fleet proceeded up the St. 
Johns River, and found that the rebels were burning 
lumber and saw mills along its banks, most of which 
belonged to northern men. They had also burned two 
gunboats which were being built at Jacksonville. On 
the 12th, the regiment, except Company C, which was 
left at Mayport, and Company I, which went down the 
river with the Hurn, reached Jacksonville, where the 
inhabitants generally received them with gladness. 
Some of the inhabitants had left however, and large 
quantities of furniture and personal baggage were left 
in their hu'^ry, piled up ready for transportation. 

On the 13th an advanced picket line was established, 
which was fired on the next day by scouts in the woods, 
and apprehending an attack, the supports fell back 
under cover of the gunboats, and barricaded the streets. 
No attack was made, however. On the 15th Company 
G, having found a quantity of rum in the town, imbibed 
it very freely, got drunk, and mutinied. Companies H 
and K charged bayonets on them, disarmed and ironed 



FOURTH BEOIMENT. 233 

the leaders, and in the melee one member of Company 
G was killed. On the 17th a reconnoissance was made 
hy Company H, five miles into the codntry, but a 
deserted camp of the enemy was all that was found. 
About this time, Colonel Whipple having resigned, his 
resignation was accepted, and he left the regiment to 
the regret of almost every officer and man. He was an 
excellent disciplinarian and an accomplished soldier. 
Lieut. Colonel Bell was promoted to Colonel, and Capt. 
Gilman E. Sleeper, of Company C, was promoted to 
Lieut. Colonel. While at Jacksonville the Fourth per- 
formed much arduous duty. A skirmish occurred on 
picket in which the regiment lost two men killed, three 
wounded, and four taken prisoners. 

On the 8th of April General Hunter ordered the place 
evacuated, and Col. Bell with seven companies, was sent 
to garrison St. Augustine, on the coast. Companies B, 
H and K, under command of Major Drew, embarked 
on the 8th of June for James Island, South Carolina, 
and were temporarily assigned to the brigade com- 
manded by Colonel Welch, of the Forty-fifth Pennsylva- 
nia, and took part in several skirmishes and the engage- 
ment at James Island, under Gen. Benham, but met 
with no loss. On the 12th of the same month these 
three companies were ordered to Beaufort, South Caro- 
lina, and constituted a part of the garrison of the town 
during the summer. The seven companies stationed at 
St. Augustine passed the summer there without casual- 
ties or incidents worthy of note. Fort Marion was 
put in good repair and the city in a state of defense. 
Tn September they were relieved by the Seventh K"ew 
Hampshire, and joined the detachment at Beaufort. 
General Mitchell assumed command of the Department, 
and preparations were made for active movements. 
The Fourth was brigaded with the Third New Hamp- 
shire, the Sixth Connecticut, Forty-seventh Ifew Yorkj 



234 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

and Henry's Battery, commanded by Brig. Gen. Bran- 
nan, The Fourth participated in the battle of Pocotal- 
igo, an account of which is given in' the history of the 
movements of the Third Regiment. The plan was to 
capture the pickets and surprise the garrison, while a 
detachment in a light draught boat were to proceed up 
the river and burn the bridge. This plan was frustrated 
by a delay on the part of the gunboats, which gave the 
rebels time to obtain re-enforcements. The troops land- 
ed and marched four miles, when the Forty-seventh 
New York engaged the enemy. Henry's Battery was 
thrown forward, supported by the Fourth E^ew Hamp- 
shire, which came under a heavy artillery fire in a small 
cotton field, through which ran the road to the bridge. 
The regiment formed line of battle and advanced to a 
marsh two hundred yards wide, on the opposite side of 
which was a rebel battery which hastily retreated. A 
sharp running skirmish of two miles ensued, in which 
a caisson and several prisoners were captured. The 
line was met by a raking fire from the defenses of the 
bridge, four hundred yards distant, across an impassable 
marsh, and only accessible by a narrow road. Trains 
loaded with re-enforcements were distinctly seen, show- 
ing that further advance with the small force was im- 
practicable. A heavy fire of musketry and artillery was 
opened upon both sides which lasted until night, when 
the Union troops were quietly withdrawn — the Fourth 
taking the rear of the retreat. In this engagement the 
regiment lost three men killed and twenty-five wound- 
ed. Colonel Bell was struck by the splinter of a shell. 
Capt. "Wallace and Lieut. Mayne were both severely 
wounded by the same ball. l!^ot a man flinched from 
his duty. For a time Col. Bell was disabled by his 
wound, and the regiment was commanded by Lieut. Col. 
Sleeper. Before night, however, Coli Bell returned 
and resumed command. The expedition failed and the 



FO UB TH REGIMENT. 235 

re^ment returned and went into winter-quarters at 
Beaufort, South Carolina, where they remained for five 
months doing picket duty and drilling. Thanksgiving 
and Christmas were observed in true New England 
fashion. 

During the year that had elapsed since the Fourth 
left the State, many changes had taken place in its or- 
ganization. One colonel, two captains, three first lieu- 
tenants and two second lieutenants had resigned; eleven 
officers had been promoted, and eight men had been 
promoted to officers from the ranks. One captain had 
been dismissed; Capt. Currier and Jjieut. Drew, and 
twenty-four men had died of disease ; three had been 
drowned, one killed by the enemy, and two by accident. 

The spring of 1863 opened vidth a great expedition 
against Charleston. On the 4th of April the Fourth 
Eegiment received marching orders, embarked on trans- 
ports and proceede'd to Hilton Head, where it was brig- 
aded with the Third and five companies of the Seventh 
New Hampshire, and Sixth Connecticut. The brigade 
was commanded by Col. H. S. Putnam, of the Seventh, 
and the division by Gen. A. H. Terry. The troops sail- 
ed from Hilton Head to Stono Inlet, and remained on 
board awaitng the result of the bombardment of Fort 
Sumter by the navy. The navy not having succeeded 
in taking the fort, the troops were carried back to Hil- 
ton Head on the 11th of April. The brigade organiza- 
tion was disbanded and the regiment went into camp. 

On the 17th of April a new brigade was organized, 
consisting of the Third and Fourth New Hampshire, 
the Sixth Connecticut, and a battalion of Sharpshooters, 
all under the command of Col. Louis Bell, of the 
Fourth, and assigned to Gen. Terry's division. On the 
18th another expedition against Charleston was inaugu- 
rated, under Gen. Gillmore, who was in command of 
the Department. The troops on transports arrived at 



236- THE GREAT REBELLION. 

Nortli Edisto Kiver on the 19th, and had another time 
on shipboard, awaiting the arrival of the navy. On the 
28th it was decided to abandon the expedition, and the 
whole force, both land and naval, sailed for Stono River, 
and the brigade was again broken up. The next day 
the Fourth arrived at Stono Inlet, disembarked on Folly 
Island and reported to Gen. Vogdes, commanding the 
United States forces on the island. The regiment en- 
camped within two miles of the enemy's worilsis on Mor- 
ris Island, in a thick growth of pines, from whose tops 
Charleston harbor, Tvith the surrounding forts could be 
plainly seen. During several weeks the time was occu- 
pied in building fortifications and picketing the northern 
extremity of the island, about fifty yards from the rebel 
pickets, across a little inlet on Morris Island. The 
pickets agreed not to fire on each other, and had very 
agreeable intercourse, exchanged tobacco, coffee, and 
newspapers, sent across the inlet in' small boats. The 
ladies occasionally came down from Charleston to take 
a look at the Tanks, and so the time passed, until the 
first of June, when the rebels, to save the cargo of a 
blockade runner, which had been grounded off Light 
House Inlet, midway between the two islands, opened 
a heavy fire upon the Union pickets, who built breast- 
works of such light materials as were at hand, and 
screened from the view of the rebels by the thick bushes 
that lined the shore, and a dense thicket in the back- 
ground, constructed masked batteries, unbeknown to 
the enemy, who supposed the sand works they could 
see were only protections to the pickets, and neglected 
to strengthen their fortifications, which might have 
been made impregnable to any direct assault. Thus 
the attempt to save the cargo of the blockade runner 
led to the capture of the island. 

On the night of the 17th of June, Company B, of the 
Fourth Regi-^^^t, commenced the first works in the 



FOVRTE REGIMENT. 237 

last long siege of Charleston, One man was killed by 
a piece of shell. For twenty-one nights, and nearly as 
many days, the regiment constructed masked batteries, 
working in silence, no one being allowed to speak above 
a whisper. On the morning of the 8th of July the 
work was completed. Forty-four guns and mortars 
were in position, the magazine filled, and the embra- 
sures cleared. Severe labor and want of sleep had so 
exhausted the men that they were obliged to relinquish 
the completion of the work they had so faithfully com- 
menced, to fresh troops, drilled for the purpose. The 
Fourth joined Gen. Terry's command, and participated 
in a diversion upon James Island. On the morning of 
the 10th the batteries opened simultaneously upon the 
enemy, who were taken completely by surprise. A rebel 
officer, while surveying our pickets through a glass, 

suddenly exclaimed "By , the Yanks have mounted 

a gim over there." At that moment forty-four " peace- 
make(rs" rained iron upon him. The advance was 
halted by the guns of Fort "Wagner, and after two des- 
perate and bloody charges it was determined to take 
that formidable work by regular approaches. On the 
same day the Fourth Regiment returned from James 
"Island, and a lodgment having been effected by our 
forces on Morris Island, the Fourth was selected, for its 
coolness in working under fire, to report to Major 
Brooks, of Gen. Gillmore's staff, and in charge of siege 
works, for engineer duty. 

The approaches, consisting of five parallels, connected 
by " covered ways " or " zigzags,"; were carried for five 
hundred yards over a sandy strip of land, not three- 
fourths as wide as Fort "Wagner, and bounded by marsh 
and ocean. At spring tide the surf filled the trenches. 
In front were forts "Wagner, Gregg and Sumter ; a little 
to the right of Sumter was Fort Moultrie, and to the 
left Fort Johnson, and a long line of batteries on Jameg 



238 TEE a BEAT REBELLION. 

Island, designated by the men after their respective 
characters, as " Bull of the Woods," " Mud Digger," 
" Peanut Battery," etc. The fire of all these forts and 
batteries was concentrated on this narrow coiiipass — ^the 
work-shop of thousands, upon which mortars, Colum- 
biads, Blakeleys, Armstrongs, Brooks and Whitworths, 
and shells of every calaber and Mnd, from the thirteen- 
inch mortar to the vindictive "Whitworth, unceasingly 
fell. Shout " Cover " to any survivor of that terrible 
siege, and he will unwittingly look in the air for a com- 
ing shell. The storm of iron was attended by a contin- 
ual " zeeb " of bullets from Fort Wagner. On the 
night of the 23d of July the Fourth planted cheoavx-de- 
frise, and dug a trench for the parallel. In this terri- 
ble place, on the hot blistering sand, and under the blaz- 
ing sun of vSouth Carolina, or in the murky darkness of 
night, lighted by bursting shells, these defenders of the 
Union toiled unflinchingly for forty-six days. Bodies 
of the dead and wounded were continually being carried 
from the trenches. In the fierce excitement of battle, 
it is comparatively easy to face death, but to advance 
slowly, day after day, amid the dead and dying is far 
more horrible than charging the cannon's mouth. Con- 
stant labor, the intense heat, and brackish water, caused 
disease which disabled more than half the number; 
and indeed those who stoutly resisted and manfully per- 
formed their duties became almost ghastly thin. 

In the meantime Fort Sumter was rendered a huge, 
inoflensive pile of brick dust. The " Swamp Angel " 
tossed shells into the doomed city, and a sap was dug 
from the fifth parallel to the very ditch of Fort Wagner. 
On the morning of the 7th of September the line was 
formed for a final charge, when the news came that the 
fort was evacuated. For once the shovel had triumphed 
over the bayonet. Fort Grregg sjiared the same fate, 
and both were afterward rebuilt and named fbr Gen- 



FO UB TH REGIMENT. 239 

eral Strong and Colonel Putnam, both of whom fell in 
process of their reduction. The cool air of autumn 
brought renewed health, and the winter was passed in 
the ordinary routine of garrison and fatigue duty in the 
various forts and on picket duty on the island. 

About the middle of January, 1864, the Fourth was 
ordered to Beaufort, South Carolina, where it was on 
garrison duty, and where the work of re-enlisting com- 
menced under charge of Capt. F. "W". Parker. In a 
week three hundred men had enlisted anew for three 
years, or during the war. 

On the 20th of February the regiment embarked on 
transports and proceeded to Hilton Head, and thence to 
Wilmington Island, up the Savannah river, and landed 
on Wibmarsh Island, seven or eight miles from Savan- 
nah, for the purpose of capturing a large number of 
negroes, engaged, under the direction of the rebel 
troops, in erecting fortifications to defend the approaches 
to the city. The force consisted of the Fourth New 
Hampshire and Eighty-fifth Pennsylvania, under com- 
mand of Col. Howell, of the latter regiment. The ex- 
pedition proved a failure, the troops re-embarked, and 
the Fourth was ordered to proceed at once to Jackson- 
ville, Florida, where they arrived on the 23d, and were 
at once put at work erecting defenses for the city, pre- 
paratory for an expected attack from the enemy, which, 
however, did not come. On the 26th the regiment 
again embarked and sailed for Beaufort, South Caro- 
lina, where they arrived the next day. 

The number of re-enlisted men had been increased to 
three hundred and eighty-eight — the largest number 
re-enlisted in any l^ew Hampshire regiment — all of 
whom received a furlough for thirty days, and under 
command of Colonel Bell, started for New Hampshire, 
and arrived on the 7th of March. The new recruits 
and the original men of the regiment who did not 



240 THE GREAT BEBELLIOIT. 

re-enlist, to the number of over two hundred, remained 
at Beaufort, under command of Lieut. Colonel Drew. 
On the 12th of April this detatchment sailed for 
Fortress Monroe, and* reported to G-eneral Butler, com- 
manding the Department of Virginia and ITorth Carolina. 
They were ordered to Gloucester Point, York Kiver. 
During the month the veterans returned, and the 
Fourth was brigaded with the Eighth Maine, Fifty-fifth 
and Mnety-seventh Pennsylvania, under command of 
Col. E. White, of the Fifty-fifth, General Ames com- 
manding the division, which formed a part of the Tenth 
Army Corps, in the Army of the James. 

On the 4th day of May this army started on trans- 
ports for Bermuda Hundred, up the James river, where 
they arrived on the 6th. A line of works extending 
from the Appomattox to the James, six miles from Ber- 
muda Hundred, was immediately thrown up. On the 
9th an advance was made, and Ames' division tore up 
several miles of the Petersburg and Richmond Eailroad, 
and then, by a hasty march, joined the Eighteenth Corps 
at Swift Creek, where the enemy in force were attacked,, 
and after a sharp fight, driven to the defenses of Peters- 
burg, on the Appomattox. At night the rebels made 
a charge, but were severely repulsed. Next morning, 
heavy firing was heard in the direction of Gen. Terry's 
command, stationed at Lempster Hill, to' repel any 
advance from Richmond. Ames' Division hurried to 
the scene of action, but did not arrive until after the 
enemy had been handsomely repulsed. After one day's 
rest the army of the James started " on to Richmond." 
Slight skirmishing occurred on the first day. At night 
a heavy rain set in, and the troops lay down to rest upon 
ground where the rebel General Hoke had encamped the 
night before. The next day the Fourth advanced along 
the railroad, the Eighteenth Corps having the right 
and the Tenth Corps the left. A few hours brought 



FOURTH REGIMENT. 241 

them to the first line df the defenses of Richmond, 
when skirmishing at once commenced. A rattling fire 
was kept up until nearly night, when Terry's Division, 
having made a detour, came upon the rebel fiank, and 
the Third N'ew Hampshire, supported by the Seventh, 
made a desperate and bloody charge. The Fourth was 
ordered to charge the works in front, and forward they 
went with a rush, over fences and ditches, and planted 
the flag on the ramparts which the enemy had hastily 
left. Gen. Gillmore now rode up amid repeated cheers. 
The Eighteenth Corps captured the right of the line 
the same evening, and thus the outer line of defenses was 
secured. The storm which had not ceased, raged with 
greater fiiry than ever, when news came that a large 
cavalry force was advancing on the Union line of com- 
munication, to cut off their supplies, so through a 
drenching rain, deep mud and intense darkness, the 
Fourth hurried-to guard against this threatened attack. 
At Chesterfield Court House, five miles from the start- 
ing point, they were met by a volley from the enemy's 
carbines. Two companies were thrown out as skirmish- 
ers, and the regiment was formed in hollow square to 
receive cavalry, and there, having reached the point to 
be guarded they remained all night. Early next morn- 
ing the regiment was ordered back to aid in taking the 
second line of the enemy's works on Drury's Bluff. 

On the 14th day of May, the Fourth supported a 
battery, under a provoking fire, and at night relieved a 
portion of the skirmish line on the right of the railroad. 
Tn front, between them and the rebel lines, for a distance 
of five hundred yards, was a thick growth of under- 
brush, affording fine cover for the enemy. The 15th 
was passed in continual sharp-shooting, and at night a 
light breastwork was thrown up. ' On the morning of 
the 16th a dense fog covered the earth. The rapid roll- 
ing of a heavy fire of musketry was heard on the right. 



242 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

The enemy were reported to be advancing in front, and 
the men put themselves in a position of defense and 
calmly awaited the foe. Suddenly a line of rebels 
sprang out of the mist, as^ if by magic, within three 
rods of the Union line ; but they as quicMy disappeared, 
for every rifle was emptied with deadly aim, and bayo- 
nets were fixed for close work. The enemy, rallied by 
their officers, whose voices could be distinctly heard, 
advanced, and again retreated, with ranks fearfally 
shattered by another volley. The Union troops were 
formed in one line, with intervals of three paces, and 
had there been the least flinching the line would have 
been lost. Besides this the cartridges were nearly ex- 
pended. The fire on the right grew heavier and nearer 
every moment, and seemed to break to the rear. An 
order from General Butler for the whole line to charge, 
put the troops in good spirits; they vainly suppos- 
ing that affairs were prosperous, when, suddenly, the 
troops on the right of the Fourth, retreated in disorder. 
The brigade, however, advanced to charge, and were 
quickly met by a counter charge, the enemy appearing in 
ovei-whelming numbers in front and in rear of the right 
flank, within a few yards, virtually making prisoners 
of a portion of the regiment; but the men could not 
understand it in that light, and after doing all that men 
could do, they retreated under a perfect hail of bullets, 
from the right, left and front. Many fired at the enemy 
within a few feet and ran from under their bayonets. 
Corporal Plumer, of Company E, shot a rebel color- 
bearer ten paces off. A bullet pierced Capt. dough's 
hat, and when he took it off a shell took the crown out. 
The air seemed filled with missiles of death. Col. 
White, commanding the brigade, was taken prisoner, 
when Col. Bell rallied the men and held the enemy in 
check until a line could be formed sufficient to cover 
the retreat. 



FO TJR TH REGIMENT. 243 

The Fourtli lost one hundred and forty-two men in 
this action, in killed, wounded and missing. Major 
Sawyer received a bullet wound in the shoulder, of 
which he died at home on the 23d of June. He was 
a brave officer and a most worthy man, respected and 
beloved by all who knew him. Lieut. Frank B. Hutch- 
inson, of Company E, was last seen firing his revolver 
within a few feet of the enemy. He knew no fear and 
shirked no duty. Capt. "Wallace, of Co. C, was again 
severely wounded. The regiment inarched back to Ber- 
muda Hundred with sadly diminished ranks. On the 
2l8t a severe skirmish took place, in which Lieuts. 
Brewster of Company B, and Stearns of Company C, 
were badly wounded. Several enlisted men were also 
more or less severely wounded, and twenty were 
taken prisoners. 

On the 28th of May the division left Bermuda Hun- 
dred on transports, vsdth orders to report to Gen. "W". F. 
Smith, commanding the Eighteenth Corps, which was 
ordered to report to Gen. Meade, commandilQg the 
Army of the Potomac. They landed at White House, 
on the Pamunkey river, and there marched to Cold 
Harbor, on the 3d of June, where they arrived the 
morning after the battle. Eight days of living and 
fighting in the trenches followed, when on the 12th the 
Eighteenth Corps was ordered back to White House, and 
the next day went on boats down the Pamunkey and 
York rivers and up the James to Bermuda Hundred. 

On the 16th of June the Corps crossed the Appomat- 
tox at Broadway Landing, and marched directly to the 
defenses of Petersburg. The outworks were hand- 
somely taken by colored troops, and a heavy line of 
earthworks developed, extending from the river over an 
interval and along the bluff, two miles from the city. 
The corps was formed in line, the colored troops on 
the left, and the division temporarily commanded by 



244 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

Gen. Brooks next. It lay under fire until five o'clock 
in the afternoon, tlien made a charge and captured the 
works. Col. Bell's brigade took one hundred and 
twenty-five prisoners and several pieces of artillery. 
Gen. Smith rode up and complimented the men for 
their gallantry. From the 16th of June, until the sur- 
render of Lee in April of the succeeding year. Gen. 
Grant's shattered hut unflinching army, stretching 
along from the Appomattox to a point beyond the 
"Weldon Kailroad, fought many bloody battles and en- 
dured untold hardships. 

The brigade returned to Bermuda Hundred on the 
18th, but was ordered back to the lines before Peters- 
burg, arriving there on the 23d. For thirty-six days 
Col. Bell's brigade remained in one position, on the left 
of what was afterward named Fort Stedman, and join- 
ed the Ninth Corps. The advance picket trench was 
within two rods of the enemy, the main line being a 
short distance in the rear. An attempt to capture the 
enemy's advance trench was made on the 30th of June. 
Col. Bell opened a furious fire from the picket line, 
while another brigade was to charge. There was a 
blunder somewhere, and the result was a heavy loss and 
nothing gained. The regiment lost fifty men in killed 
and wounded, while performing ordinary trench duty. 
This was one of the darkest times during the rebellion — 
thousands of noble men lost, and not a complete vic- 
tory gained. Only once was there a cessation of fire. 
One morning the "Yanks" and "Johnnies" simultane- 
ously dropped their rifles, and in a minute were together 
swapping coffee for tobacco, and pleasantly chatting 
together. 

The regiment took part in the famous battle of the 
" Mine," on the 30th of July. The previous night the 
Division, under command of Gen. Turner, was quietly 
withdrawn from the front and massed in rear of and 



FOURTH REGIMENT. 245 

near the covered way leading to the Mine. About half- 
past four o'clock in the morning the earth was shaken 
by the explosion, and the artillery immediately opened. 
It was a grand commencement, and seemed, as a man 
remarked, " like forty-four Fourths of July rolled into 
one." The crater of the blown up fort was quickly 
taken by a part of the Ninth Corps, in which was the 
Sixth, N^inth and Eleventh New Hampshire. Col. Bell's 
brigade advanced on the right and took a position under 
a terrible enfilading fire from a battery just across a 
ravine, on a knoll. Men were literally mowed down, 
and lay dead as if in ranks. A sharp fire upon the rebel 
gunners saved them from greater loss. A division of 
colored troops was ordered up, but they had never been 
under a heavy fire before, and acted very much like 
other raw troops. The plan was to charge immediately, 
but something was wrong, and the troops suffered for 
the blunder. The air seemedfiUed with bursting shells, 
the hiss of canister, and the shriek of raking grape. 
The heat was intense, and many men fell from sun- 
stroke. The rebels made an advance in strong force, 
tiie negroes became panic stricken, and instead of re- 
treating, mixed up in awful confusion. They formed a 
breastwork for the rebels, for to fire was to hit them, 
and to advance was impossible. It seemed an easy thing 
to beat back the rebels if the negroes had been out of 
the way. This delay gave the enemy the advantage, 
and so the Fourth retreated to the intrenched line. CoL 
Bell reformed his brigade, planted the colors on the 
earthworks, and held the line until relieved, at four 
o'clock in the afternoon, by Gen. Stevens' brigade. The 
regiment lost fifty out of two hundred men, in killed, 
and wounded. Capt. Clough, commanding the regi- 
ment, was wounded when the retreat commenced, and 
Capt. Parker took command. That night the regiment 
took its old Dosition in the trench, and the next day 



246 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

marched to Bermuda Hundred, under a burning sun, 
from which the tired soldiers suffered very much. Here 
the regiment had twelve days of rest, except their turn 
on picket. 

Another movement was to be made north of the 
James, simultaneously with one on the "Weldon Eailroad. 
The Tenth Corps crossed the river in the night of the 
13th of August, and at break of day the leading brigade 
took the enemy's outer line of works. The negroes 
handsomely redeemed their reputation, which had suf- 
fered at the Mine, by making a successful charge. The 
Fourth was engaged all day in skirmishing. The next 
day a movement was made to get in rear of the enemy's 
line at Malvern Hill, which was accomplished by Grant's 
well known flanking operations. One brigade was 
kept closely skirmishing with the enemy, while another 
moved around to the right. A sorry accident closed 
the incidents of the day. Tim Eeardon, a tall Milesian, 
of Company G, mistaking the position of our forces, 
rode into the enemy's lines with sixteen canteens of 
whisky; "a drop of comfort" for the Johnnies, but a 
sad mistake for poor Tim and his expectant comrades. 
During the night, while guarding one of the main thor- 
oughfares leading to Richmond, Lieut. Stephen J. Went- 
worth, of Company K, a brave young officer, fell while 
leading his company forward as skirmishers, in a sharp 
encounter with the enemy who made their appearance 
in a thick wood. 

On the morning of the 16th Gen. Terry's Division, in 
a gallant charge, took a strong line of works in the rear 
of Malvern Hill. The enemy advanced in strong force 
and attempted to recapture the line. The division 
slowly.withdrew behind the breastworks, but .with heavy 
loss. The enemy closely followed, and charged fiercely 
on the line of works, but were sent quickly back with 
broken ranks.' Several officers in command of the brig- 



FOURTH REGIMENT. 247 

ade, were -wounded, and Capt. Parker, of the Fourth, 
succeeded to the command, and while the forward move- 
ment was being made, directed the change of position ; 
but in his turn was disabled by a severe wound in the 
neck, just as the enemy were repulsed. A second 
charge was made by the rebels with more success. The 
Fourth lost in the action forty-five men killed and 
wounded. Capt. Hobbs, of Company A, took command 
of the regiment, and the Tenth Corps shortly withdrew 
to Bermuda Hundred. A captain was ip command of 
the brigade, and only one captain was left for duty in 
the Fourth Kegiment. 

After a few days of rest the Second Division was 
again moved to the front of Petersburg, and took posi- 
tion under the constant dropping of iron and lead from 
the rebel lines. The time of enlistment of the original 
men expired on the 18th of September, when Lieut. 
Col. Drew, several other officers, and one hundred and 
seventy-four enlisted men took their departure for New 
Hampshire. Of the three hundred and eighty-eight 
who re-enlisted in February, and over seven hundred 
recruits, only a small number remained fit for duty, 
and at the attack on Fort Gilmer, on the 29th of Sep- 
tember, only forty men could be mustered for the fight. 
This was one of the most bloody battles in which the 
regiment was ever engaged. Until near the middle of 
December the Fourth was engaged in picket and trench 
duty north of the James. 

On the 12th of December, an expedition against Fort 
Fisher having been planned, a fleet with a large num- 
ber of troops on board, left Hampton Roads, and landed 
on the 24th. After a careful survey Gen. "Weitzel decid- 
ed that the fort was impregnable by direct assault, and 
the expeditionary corps returned to their former position 
north of the James, and went into winter quarters near 
the picket line. A second expeditionary corps against 



248 THE QREAT REBELLION. 

Fort Fisher was organized, in which Gen. Terry was 
to command, and Gen. Ames was to do the hard fight- 
ing, composed of troops who had shown valor under 
the most trying circumstances. Every man of the 
Fourth Regiment, capable of doing duty, was brought 
into the ranks, and the regiment was commanded by 
Capt. John H. Roberts. On the l-3th of January, 1865, 
the fleet moved into line and opened fire. The troops 
were landed through a heavy surf on a hard beach, 
about five miles north of the fort. Gen. Paine's di- 
vision and Gen. Abbott's brigade were sent to prevent 
an advance from the enemy above. Gen. Ames formed 
his division across the narrow tongue of land which 
separates Cape Fear river from the ocean, and moved 
forward about two miles toward the fort, where he 
threw up a hasty line of works and m^de a careful 
reconnoissance. The bombardment, scarcely paralleled 
in history, which paved Fort Fisher with iron, con- 
tinued without cessation till three o'clock . on the after- 
noon of the 15th. This was one of the very strongest 
of the rebel works, and it was to be determined whether 
or not it could be taken ; and this little veteran division, 
consisting of men from New Hampshire, New York, 
Pennsylvania and Indiana, led by Gen. Ames, had 
this momentous question entrusted to their hands. It 
was a duty to make the stoutest heart quail. A force 
of marines at first charged the sea-face of the fort, and 
were repulsed after a gallant fight. Just at the instant 
when the rebel garrison were crowding to the sea-face, 
exultant with their victory, and pouring their fire into 
the retreating marines, Gen. Curtis' brigade dashed 
forward upon the angle near Cape Fear river, closely 
followed by Pennypacker's and Bell's brigades. The 
movement was successful. The gate and one mound 
were gained, though the road to the former lay over a 
broken bridge, enfiladed and crossed by a murderous 



FOURTH REGIMENT. 249 

fire. G-allantly leading his brigade, Col. Bell had almost 
gained the bridge, when a shot struck him, and he fell 
mortally wounded. A moment later and the tattered 
colors of his regiment were planted on the first mound 
of the fort. Thus fell the Colonel of the Fourth E'ew 
Hampshire, dearly beloved and deeply mourned by his 
brigade. Dignified, yet genial; brave, yet cautious; 
never sacrificing lives uselessly; ever ready to share 
danger and hardship with his men; no influence or 
peril could deter him from doing his duty, or shake 
a resftlution once formed. 

The gate and captured mound formed the base of 
operations against the rest of the fort, though to any 
but iron nerved men it would have proved but a slen- 
der foothold ; for the rebels still had the advantage of 
superior numbers — twelve mounds to one, and Fort 
Buchanan below, to rake the inside of the work. 
Admiral Porter kept up a continued and harassing 
fire. The division fought with the greatest desperation. 
The fire of the enemy was well directed and incessant. 
The contest continued till after ten o'clock in the 
evening, and nine of the traverses were taken. The 
men were almost exhausted and the ranks were fear- 
fully decimated. The enemy's fire had almost ceased 
when Gen. Abbott's brigade entered the fort, and the 
remainder of the rebels soon after surrendered. The 
fierce and prolonged struggle was over, and victory was 
proclaimed by a blaze of rockets from the fieet and the 
triumphant cheers of the men on shore. Instances of 
individual gallantry in the Fourth Regiment were 
numerous, and many of them will never be known to 
the world. Capt. Roberts,' who had been in every 
battle, siege and march of the regiment, was very 
active and eflScient throughout the fight. Adjutant 
Challis was disabled in the first of the fight by a piece 
of shell, but recovered in time to assist in taking the 



250 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

ifth traverse, in which were rallied the colors of seven 
iifferent regiments within the space of a few feet. 
There was a terrible conflict to gain the seventh, and 
juite a number of attempts had failed, when Adjutant 
Dhallis collected thirty-five men from the several regi- 
nents of the division, and charged directly upon the 
rebel garrison. The fight was short, desperate and 
successful. Color Sergeant Plumer, who had planted 
;he flag on the first mound, now, in advance of all, 
placed the broken standard on the eighth mound, so 
lear the rebel flag that the stars and stripes actually 
lapped against the southern cross. About this time 
le fell badly wounded. Capt. Huckins, of Company K, 
vas specially complimented for his coolness and efficien- 
;y while acting upon the staflF of Gen. Ames, who was 
;he leader and guide of every movement of the contest. 
That night, as all that were left of the Fourth New 
Sampshire were sleeping over a magazine, it suddenly 
jxploded, thus adding to the already long list of 
jasualties. 

The regiment remained at Fort Fisher until the 11th 
)f February, when the advance on Wilmington was 
jommenced. Capt. Parker, who had been wounded 
it Deep Bottom, had been commissioned Lieutenant 
Z/olonel, and having recovered from his wound, returned 
;o the regiment and assumed command. The rebel 
brees under Gen. Hoke were stationed at Sugar Loaf 
Battery, about two miles from the Union picket line. 
k. night expedition, planned to get into their rear, 
Biled. Ames' division was ordered to Smithfield, on 
;he opposite side of Cape Fear river, where they joined 
jren. Cox's division of the Twenty-third Corps, and by 
I rapid movement on the night of the 18th, invested 
Fort Anderson, just in time to find it evacuated, and 
;he garrison of three thousand men gone. They were 
pursued and fled beyond "Wilmington, leaving the city 



FO UB TS REGIMENT. 251 

in tlie possession of the Union army. Here tlie regiment 
had a period of needed rest. . On the 10th of March 
the Tenth Corps marched to join Gen. Sherman on 
information that he had arrived at Fayetteville. Sher- 
man's whole army passed the Corps at Cox's Bridge , 
fresh from their battle and victory at Averyshoro. 
After. a short rest the Tenth Corps was detailed to open 
and guard the railroad from Wilmington to Golds- 
borough. The Fourth was stationed along the road 
between Wilmington and Little Washington. Supplies 
having been forwarded to the main army, the whole 
Force once more pushed on to finish the enemy. Lieut. 
Col. Parker and Adjutant Challis were captured when 
a short distance outside the picket line, by a squad of 
Wheeler's cavalry; thus being afforded the pleasure 
of seeing the rebel army collapse, when the news was 
received of Lee's surrender. 

Through the exertions of Gov. Frederick Smyth, the 
Fourth was mustered out, and arrived home on the 
27th of August. The city of Manchester gave them a 
grand reception. Gov. Smith welcomed the regiment 
in an eloquent speech. 

One hundred and forty veterans returned with the 
regiment. Fifty were mustered out in hospitals. 
During the four years 1394 men were members of 
the Fourth. Of these 282 were killed in action or died 
of disease ; 340 were discharged for disability occasion- 
ed by wounds or disease, and 57 died in rebel prisons. 
Thus after four years of arduous and honorable service, 
the Fourth Regiment ceased to exist as an organization, 
ind its members returned to their peaceful avocations. 



252 TSE GREAT REBELLION 

FIFTH REGIMENT. 



The Fifth Regiment was raised under the same call 
and paid the same bounty as the Third and Fourth; It 
rendezvoused and was mustered into the United States 
service at Concord, its muster being completed on the 
26th of October, 1861, and reported ready for active ser- 
vice. The whole organization numbered ten hundred 
and ten, including a good band and a corps of buglers, 
attached to each company, and it left the State for the 
seat of war, on the 29th of October. The colors were 
presented by Gov. Berry, and received by Col. Cross 
with appropriate and earnest speeches. Previous to the 
day of departure the men were given three days fur- 
lough, in which to visit their homes and friends, and to 
many of them it was, alas, their last visit. The following 
were the field, staff and company officers of the regi- 
ment, and their record, during its term of service : 

FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS. 

Colonels — Edward E. Cross, of Lancaster. 

kiUed at Gettysburg, July 2, 1863. 

Charles E. Hapgood, of Amherst. 

Wounded July 16, 1864. Honorably discharged Oct. 14, 1864. 

Eichard E. Cross, of Lancaster. 

Revoked April 29, 1865. 

Lieut. Colonels — Samuel G. Langley, of Manchester. 

Resigned Dec. 1, 1862. 

Charles E. Hapgood, of Amherst. 

Promoted to Colonel July 3, 1863. 

Richard E. Cross, of Lancaster. 

Cashiered Aug. 4, 1864. Disability resulting from dismissal removed, Jan 
16, 1865. Appointed Colonel Feb. 21, 1865. 

James E. Larkin, of Concord. 

Mustered out Oct. 12, 1864 



FIFTH BEOIMENT. 253 

Welcome A. Crafts, of Milan. 

Appointed Colonel IT. S. V. by brevet, for gallant and meritorious conduct 
during the war, to date from March 13, 1865. Mustered out as Lieut. Colonel 
June 28, 1865. 

Majors — ^William "W. Cook, of Derry. 

Resigned July 17, 1862. 

Edward E. Sturtevant, of Concord. 

Killed at Fredericksburg Dec. 13, 1862. 

James E. Larkin, of Concord. 

Promoted to Lieut. Colonel Sept. 6, 1864. 

Welcome A. Crafts, of Milan. 

Promoted to Lieut. Colonel Oct. 28, 1864. 

Thomas L. Livermore, of Milford. 

Promoted to Colonel 18th N. H. Begt. Jan. 17, 1865. 

Adjutants— rCliarles Dodd, of Boston, Mass. 

Resigned June 13, 1868. 

Elias H. Marston, of E'orth Hampton. 

Mustered out October 22, 1864. 

James W. Flood. 

Mustered out June 28, 1865. 

Quartermasters — ^Edward M. Webber, of Somersworth. 

Mustered out Oct. 25, 1864. 

Owen T. Cummings, of Enfield. 

Declined March 15, 1864. 

Surgeons — ^Luther M. Knight, of Franklin. 

Resigned May 28, 1868. 

John W. Buckman, of Lancaster. 

Mustered out Oct. 26, 1864. 

William Cliild, of Bath. 

Mustered out June 28, 1865. 

Ass't Surgeons — John W. Buckman, of Lancaster. 

Promoted to Surgeon June 1, 1863. 

WilUam Child, of Bath. 

Promoted to Surgeon Oct. 28, 1864. 

Charles M. Trask^ of Stewartstown. 

Mustered out Dec. 27, 1864. 

D. A. Eobinson, of Milan. 

Mustered out June 28, 1865. 

Chaplains — ^Elijah R. WilMns, of Lisbon. 

Resigned June 18, 1862. 

Milo M. Ransom, of Lisbon. 

Resigned Jan. 27, 1862. 

Silas F. Dean, of Manchester. 

Mustered out June 28, 1866. 



254 THE ORE AT REBELLION. 

Sergeant Majors — ^Daniel K. Cross, of Hanover. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. Feb. 23, 18C2. 

George A. Gay, of Newmarket. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. Sept. 11, 1862. 

Charles F. Liscomb, of Lebanon. 

' Promoted to Second Lieut. Oct. 1, 1862. 

Lee 0. Sears, of Wew York City. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. Dec. 14, 1862. 

Charles A. Hale. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. March 1, 1868. 

Elias H. Marston, of North Hampton. 

Promoted to Adjutant July 1, 1863. 

Mason "W. Humphrey, of Waterbury, Vt. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. Oct. 2, 1863. 

Benjamin S. "Wilson, of Hillsborough. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. 1st. U. S. Vols., Oct. 28, 1863. 

Edward Lussoy. 

Died of wounds. 

Eufus K. Pearl. 

Mustered out June 28, 1865 

Quartermaster Sergeants — John A. Duren, of Keene. 

Jrromoted to Second Lieut. April 21, 1863. 

Owen T. Cummings, of Enfield. 

Mustered out Oct. 29, 1864. 

Albert Gill. 

Mustered out June 28, 1865. 

Commissary Sergeants — ^I. "W. Hammond, of Concord. 

Mustered out Oct. 28, 1864 

Levi Johnson, of Claremont. 

Discharged by order of War Department, May 30, 1865. 
Jonas Adams. 

Mustered out June 28, 1865. 

Hospital Stewards — Charles M. Trask, of Stewartstown. 

Promoted to Assistant Surgeon June 1, 1863. 

Edwin A. Knight. 

Mustered out June 28, 1865. 

Principal Musicians — Daniel Johnson. 

• ~ Not ofScially accounted for. 

Ephraim McDaniel. 

Discharged for disability Oct. 31, 1862. 

Addison W. Heath. 

Mustered out Oct. 29. 1864. 

Enoch Clement. 

Mustered out June 28, 1865. 



FIFTH REGIMENT. 255 

■ Alfred A. Libby. 

Mustered out June 28, 1865. 

Leader of Band — ^Addison Adams, of Concord. 

Mustered out Aug. 8, 1862. 
COMPANY OFFICERS. 

Co. A. — Captains — ^Edward E. Sturtevant, of Concord. 

Promoted to Major July 30, 1862. 

James E. Larkin, of Concord. 

Promoted to Major July 3, 1863. 

O'Neill E. Twitcbell, of Dummer. 

Mustered out June 28, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — James E. Larkin, of Concord. 

Promoted to Captain July 31, 1862. 

John "W". Bean, of Danbury. 

Promoted to Captain Deo. 16, 1862. 

Charles E. Liscomb, of Lebanon. 

Died Jan. 5, 1864. 

John W. Crosby, of Milford. 

Honorably discharged July 24, 1864. 

"Warren E,yder. 

KiUed April 7, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — Stephen E. Twombly, of Milton. 

Resigned May 10, 1862. 

Albert G. Cummings, of Enfield. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Not. 10, 1862. 

"William 0. Lyford, of Laoonia. 

Promoted to First Lieut. March 2, 1863. 

E,uel G. Austin, of Claremont. 

Died July 27, 1863. 

George L. Hersom, of Milton. 

Promoted to First Lieut. July 2, 1864. 

Co. B. — Captains — ^Edmund Brown, of Lancaster. 

Discharged Feb. 2, 1862. 

Thomas J. Rice, of Boston, Mass. 

Resigned Sept. 10, 1862. 

Welcome A. Crafts, of Milan. 

Promoted to Major, Sept. 6, 1864. 

Henry S. Hilliard, of Stewartstown. 
Captured April 7, 1865. Re-captured April 10, 1865. Mustered out June 
28, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — ^Welcome A. Crafts, of Milan. 

Promoted to Captain Sept 11, 1862. 



266 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

John S. Ricker, of Milton. 

Promoted to Captain, Dec. 18, 1862. 

Augustus D. Sanborn, of Franklin. 

Promoted to Captain, Feb. 1, 1864. 

George E. Shapleigt, of RoUiusford. 

Killed in action June 16, 1864. 

Charles Jenkins. 

Discharged for disability, Feb. 18, 1865. 

John G. Simonds. 

Discharged for disability. May, 15, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — R. R. Somes, of Laconia. 

Promoted to First. Lieut. Feb. 16, 1862. 

James "W. Parks, of New York City. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Sept. 8, 1862. 

O'lSTeill R. Twitchell, of Dummer. 

Promoned to First Lieut. Dec. 18, 1862. 

Robert S. Dame, of Concord. 

Promoted to First Lieut. March 3, 1863. 

John A. Duren of.Keene. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Octi 1, 1863. 

Henry S. Hilliard, of Stewartstown. 
Dismissed Oct. 10, 1864. Disability resulting from dismissal removed Dec. 
13, 1864. 

Elijah F. Marden. 

Mustered out, June 28, 1865. 

Co. C. — Captains — James B. Perry, of Lebanon. 

Killed at Fredericksburg, Dec. 13, 1862. 

John S. Ricker of Milton. 

Promoted to Major, March 15, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — ^Kathan H. Randlett, of Lebanon. 

Promoted to Captain, Sept. 8, 18C2. 

James W. Parks, of 'Sew York City. 

Resigned Jan. 13, 1863. 

Everett S. Fitch, of Lebanon. 

Wounded June 3, 1868. Promoted to Captain, July 1, 1864 

George S. Gove, of Raymond. 

Mustered out Oct. 12, 1864. 
Ira T. Bronson. 

Mustered out June 28, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — Wm.. A. Moore, of Littleton. 

Promoted to First Lieut, Feb. 1, 1862. 

John W". Lawrence, of Claremont. 

Resigned Oct 23, 1862. 



FIFTE REGIMENT. 257 

Everett S. Fitch, of Lebanon. 

Promoted to First Lieut. March 1, 1863. 
MasoD "W". Humphrey, of Waterbury, Vt. 

Promoted to First Lieut Feb. 1, 1864. 
John "W". Spaulding, of Clai'emont. 
Wovinded June 3, 1864. Honorably discharged Nov. 5, 1864. 

George Yazier. 

Revoked June 2, 1863. 

Co. D. — Captains — John Murray, of l^Tewcastle. 

Killed at Fredericksburg Dec. 13, 1862. 
Samuel S. Quinn, of Keene. 

Resigned Feb. 17, 1863. 
George F. Goodwin, of Lebanon, Me. 

Killed at Cold Harbor, June 3, 1864. 

Everett S. Fitch, of Lebanon. 

Mustered out Oct. 12, 1864. 

First Lieuts. — Geo. W. Balloeh, of Great Falls. 
Promoted to Captain and C. S. Vols., July 21, 1862. Breveted Colonel 
July 22, 1865, to date from March 13, 1865. 

Daniel K. Cross, of Hanover. 

Transferred to Co. 6. 
Samuel S. Quinn, of Keene. 

Promoted to Captain, Dec. 17, 1862. 

Nathaniel F. Low, of Randolph. 

Mustered out Oct. 30, 1864. 

Thomas Waburton. 

Mustered out June 28, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — Samuel F. Varney, of Rochester. 

Resigned April 13, 1862. 

John S. Ricker, of Milton. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Sept. 11, 1862. 

George A. Gay, of Newmarket. 

Killed at Antietam, Sept. 17, 1862. 

Charles F. Liseomb, of Lebanon. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Dec. 19, 1862. 

Nathaniel F. Low, of Randolph. 

Promoted to First Lieut. July 1, 1863. 

George R. Shapleigh, of Rollinsford. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Feb. 1, 1864. 

William Whittaker, of Stoddard. 

Discharged Not. 10, 1864. 

Co E — Captains — Ira McL. Barton, of Newport. 

Beaigned Sept. 6, 1862. 



258 THE ORE AT REBELLION. 

Nathan H. Eandlett, of Lebanon. 

Honorably discharged March 2, 1863. 

Thomas L. Livermore, of Milford. 

Promoted to Major Oct. 28, 1864. 

John E. McCrillis. 

Discharged for disability May 4, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Thomas J. Rice, of Boston, Mass. 

Promoted to Captain Feb. 16, 1862. 

"William A. Moore, of Littleton. 

Transferred to Co. F May 11, 1862. 

Dexter G. Reed, of Newport. 

Resigned Nov. 6, 1862. 

Sumner F. Hurd, of Newport. 

Resigned May 2, 1863. 

Charles A. Hale, of Lebanon. 

Honorably discharged Aug. 11, 1864. 

Charles E. EUerback. 

Mustered out June 28, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — Dexter G. Reed, of Newport. 

Promoted to First Lieut. May 11, 1862. 

Sumner F. Hurd, of Newport. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Nov. 10, 1862. 

George Nettleton, of Claremont. 

Killed at Fredericksburg, Deo. 13, 1862. 

"William McGee, of Philadelphia, Pa. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Nov. 16, 1863. 

Sampson "W. Townsend, of "Wakefield. 
Wounded July 3, 1864. Honorably discharged Sept. 6, 1864. 

Go. F. — Captains — Horace T. H. Pierce, of Keene. 

Resigned Jan. 29, 1863. 

Albert G. Cummings, of Enfield. 

Mustered out Oct. 6, 1864. 

Charles A. Hale; of Lebanon. 

Mustered out June 28, 1866. 

First Lieuts. — Moses "W. Rand, of Gorham. 

Resigned April 26, 1862. 

"William A.. Moore, of Littleton. 

' Promoted to Captain Nov. 10, 1862. 

Albert G. Cummings, of Enfield. 

Promoted to Captain March 1, 1863. 

Joseph B. Fay, of Amherst. 

Mustered out Oct. 28, 1864. 

George F. Guppy, of Rochester. 

Promoted to Captain May 1, 1865. 



FIFTH REGIMENT. 25'9 

Second Lieuts. — Samuel S. Quinn, of Keene. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Aug. 1, 1862. 

George F. Goodwin, of Lebanon, Me. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Dec. 17, 1862. 

Lee C. Sears. 

Died Jan. 11, 1868. 

Josephs. Fay, of Aruhorst. 

Promoted to First Lieut. July 3, 1863. 

George Vose, of Auilierst. 

Mustered out Oct. 29, 1864. 

Co. G. — Captains — Charles H. Long, of Claremont. 

Resigned Nov. 6, 1862. 

. Jacob W. Keller, of Claremont. 

Honorably discharged Jan. 26, 1864. 
Augustus D. Sanborn, of Frauklin. 

Mustered out Oct. 30, 1864. 

William Collins. 
Wounded severely April 7, 1865. Died of wounds April 29, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Jacob W. Keller, of Claremont. 

Promoted to Captain July 26, 1862. 

Samuel S. Quinn, of Keene. 

PromoteJ to Captain Deo. 17, 1862. 
Daniel K. Cross, of Hanover. 

Honorably discharged Nov. 15, 1863. 

Mason W. Humphrey, of Waterbury Vt. 

Killed at Cold Harbor, June 3, 1864. 

Rodney H. Kamsey, of Charlestown. 

Mustered out June 28, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — Charles 0. Ballou, of Claremont. 
Promoted to First Lieut. Feb. 18, 1862. 

Daniel K. Cross, of Hanover. 

Promoted to First Lieut, Aug. 1, 1862. 

Samuel B. Little, of Claremont. 
Wounded at Fredericksburg Dec. 13, 1862. Died of wounds Dec. 24, 1862. 

John W. Crosby, of Milford. 

Promoted to First Lient. Jan. 6, 1864 

Daniel Libby, of Tuftonborough. 

Mustered out Oct. 30, 1864. 

Issachar W. Smith. 

Discharged by order of War Department, May 29, 1865. 

Co. H. — ^Captains — Richard R. Davis, of Wolfeboroiiiirli. 

Resigned July 25, 1862. 

William A. Moore, of Littleton. 

Killed at Fredericksburg, Dec. 13, 1862. 



260 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

Jauvrin "W. Graves, of Tuftonborough. 

Honorably discharged Dec. 9, 1864. 
Jonathan C. S. Twitchell. 

Mustered out June 28, 1866. 

First Lieuts. — Eichard E. Cross, of Lancaster. 

Promoted to Captain Feb. 17, 1862. 

Jauvrin "W". Graves, of Tuftonborough. 

Promoted to Captain Dec. 14, 1862. 

William O. Lyford, of Laconia. 

• Honorably discharged Nov. 6, 1868. 

William McGee, of Philadelphia, Pa. 

Mustered out Dec. 22, 1864. 

Theron A. Farr. 

Mustered out June 28, 1865. 

' Second Lieuts. — J. W. Graves, of Tuftonborough. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Feb. 17, 1862. 

Henry B. Randall, of Wolfeborough. 

Resigned Sept. 6, 1862. 

Charles W. Bean, of Northwood. 

Died of wounds Oct. 10, 1862. 

Augustus D. Sanborn, of Franklin. ' 

Promoted to First Lieut Dec 20, 1862. 

Charles A. Hale, of Lebanon. 

Promoted to First Lieut. July 2, 1868. 

Wendell R. Cook, of Claremont. 

Mustered out Oct. 15, 1864. 

Benjamin Howe. 

Mustered out June 28, 1865. 

Co. I. — Captains — Charles E. Hapgood, of Amherst. 

Promoted to Lieut. Colonel Dec. 14, 1862. 

John W. Bean, of Banbury. 

Wounded June 8, 1864. Honorably discharged Sept. 20, 1864. 

Augustus J. Hoitt, of Northwood. 

Mustered out June 28, 1866. 

First Lieuts. — ^Elijah W. Johnson, of Canaan. 

Resigned Jan. 24, 1862. 

Rinaldo R. Somes, of Laconia. 

Resigned June 10, 1862. 

Francis W. Butler, of Bennington. 

Promoted to Captain Dee. 15, 1862. 

O'Neill R. Twitchell, of Bummer. 

Promoted to Captain Oct. 1, 1863. 



FIFTH BEGmENT. 261 

John A. Duren, of Keene. 

T&ken prisoner at Cold Harbor, June 3, 1864. Beleased. Mustered out 
Muoh 16, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — Jolin "W". Bean, of Danbury. 

Promoted to First Lieut. July 31, 1862. 

George "W. George, of Amherst. 

Honorably discharged March 7, 1863. 

George C. Flanders, of Daubury. 

Discharged July 20, 1863. 

Arthur H. Perkins, of Danbury. 

Mustered out Not. 6, 1864. 

Isaac L. Gardiner, 

Promoted to First Lieut. May 5, 1865. 

Co. K. — Captains — ^Richard Welch, of Plaistow. 

Discharged by War Department Feb. 15, 1862. 

Eiichard E. Cross, of Lancaster. 

Promoted to Major Dec. 14, 1862. 

Francis "W. Butler, of Bennington. 

Died of wounds, July 80, 1864. 

Asel B. Griggs. 

Honorably discharged June 10, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — James B. David, of Amherst. 

Discharged by War Department Feb. 15, 1862. 

Charles 0. Ballou, of Claremont. 

Killed at Fredericksburg, Dec. 13, 1862. 

Thomas L. Livermore, of Milford. 

Promoted to Captain March 8, 1863. 

Robert S. Dame, of Concord. 

Mustered out Oct. 6, 1864. 

James E, Follansbee. 

Wounded April 7, 1865. Not officially accounted for. 

Second Lieuts. — ^F. "W. Butler, of Bennington. 

Promoted to First Lieut. June 10, 1862. 

Thomas L. Livermore, of Milford. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Dec. 14, 1862. 

Thomas H. Walker, of Durham. 

Resigned June 11, 1863. 

George S. Gove, of Raymond. 

Promoted to First Lieut July 1, 1864. 

Robert H. Chase, of Claremont. 

Killed at Beam's Stat.on, Oct 6, 1864. 

Warren H. Fletcher, of Claremont. 

Mustered out June 28, 1866. 



262 TSE QBEAT REBELLION. 



COLONEL EDWAKD E. CROSS. 

Colonel Cross was born at Lancaster on the 22d of 
April, 1832. His father, Hon. Ephraim Cross, was once 
a State Senator, and his mother was a daughter of Hon. 
Richard C. Everett, of Lancaster, who had been an 
Associate Justice of the Court of Common Pleas. 
With such education as he could acquire at the public 
schools and an academy, at the age of fifteen years Col, 
Cross entered the printing office of the Coos County 
Democrat, published by Hon. James M. Rix, where he 
remained two years, when he went to Canada, to assist 
his father in steamboat-building, and visited the cities 
and other places of interest in Britisji America. When 
twenty years old he went to Cincinnati, Ohio, and was 
for a time employed as a reporter in the Atlas office, 
and was afterward local editor of the Cincinnati Daily 
Times. He was for two sessions of Congress special 
correspondent of that paper at Washington, during 
which time he also wrote spicy letters for the New 
York Herald and other influential journals, in all of 
which he displayed considerable ability as a political 
and general writer. While at Washington he was 
appointed Adjutant of an Ohio regiment of infantry 
raised for service in Utah, but for some reason the 
regiment was not mustered into service. In 1857 Col. 
Cross traveled extensively in the United States and 
Canada, and contributed a series of interesting letters 
to the newspaper press. 

Afterward he journeyed to the " Plains " of the far 
West, to the wild Indian region of northern Minnesota, 
and the country of the Yellow Medicine River and the 
Upper Missouri. While visiting the latter places he 
was associated with a party of trappers and bufialo hun- 
ters, during which they had several encounters with the 




^S V &EPerm= N»r»^ - 



'-^^^•^S,^^^^ /^ 




COL. EDWARD E. CROSS, 
5%NH.V 



FIFTH REGIMENT. 263 

Sioux and Cheyenne Indians. During these travels Col. 
.Cross wrote letters for different newspapers and pre- 
pared several illustrated articles upon travel for popular 
magazines. He also wrote many sketches and gems of 
poetry over the signature of " Richard Everett," which 
were quite generally admired. In 1858, with a small 
party, he started for Arazona, with a view to establish- 
ing a mining company in that then newly organized ter- 
ritory. They took with them the first steam engine and 
printing press transported across the Rocky Mountains. 
Their journey was seventeen hundred miles in length, 
extending through northern Texas via El Paso del 
Norte and La Mesilla, and requiring six months for its 
accomplishment. A great portion of the way lay through 
the wild and romantic regions of the Camanche and 
Apache Indians. These tribes were then very hostile 
to the whites, and the little company of pioneers were 
in constant danger of attack. At one time Col. Cross, 
with five of his companions followed a warlike band of 
Apaches for fourteen days, two of whom were killed 
and several wounded. In these skirmishes he won the 
reputation of an intrepid Indian scouter and fighter. 
On one occasion the party were three days without 
food and thirty hours without water. Finally, rendered 
almost insane by hunger, they came out on 'Sew Tear's 
day at the overland mail station at Apache Pass in 
Arizona. The expedition was not successful on account 
of the limited number of whites in the territory and the 
frequent inroads of hostile tribes of Indians. A paper 
was established called the "Arizonian," while editing 
which Col. Cross had difficulty with a Lieut. Mowry, 
and by him was challenged. This was the general mo^e 
of settling personal difficulties in that country, and Col. 
Cross did not feel that he could decline the challenge 
and retain the respect and confidence of the people 
among whom he was settled. They fought with rifles 



264 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

at thirty paces. At the first fire Mowry's ball grazed 
Col. Cross' right cheek, while the ball of the latter 
passed through the Lieutenant's coat. At the second 
round Mowry's rifle missed fire, and he claimed the priv- 
ilege of shooting at his opponent unarmed. The affair 
now assumed a most serious character, but Col. Cross, 
nothing daunted, threw down his weapon and coolly 
folding his arms stood up to receive the fire of his oppo- 
nent. Mowry, astonished and impressed at the iioble 
conduct of his adversary, dropped his rifle and exclaimed, 
" I can't fire at such a man as that." Thus the unfor- 
tunate difficulty happily terminated. This event secured 
for Col. Cross the reputation of a man of the highest 
nerve and bravery. 

The state of society at Arazona was at that time 
devoid of law and order. Lynch courts were of fre- 
quent occurrance, and Col. Cross was ofteU called to 
preside over them. He twice, crossed the "Plains" 
and visited the Atlantic States, and took out another 
mining company from St. Louis, Missouri. The 
national troops were withdrawn from the territory of 
Arazona and the Indians became very troublesome. 
Several expeditions were sent out against them, which 
Col. Cross invariably commanded. "While he was ab- 
sent on a march against the Apaches, a portion of the 
tribe attacked the mining company from St. Louis and 
murdered nearly every member of the party. During 
his residence in Arazona, Col. Cross took great pains 
to examine the country, and collect full and valuable 
notes of the mineral and vegetable resources of the 
territory. His notes upon the character and habits of 
th^ roving tribes of the " far "West " were very exten- 
sive, faithfully and carefully prepared, and included 
five vocabularies of Indian tongues. Soon after the 
destriiction of the St. Louis mining company, Col. 
Cross left Arazona and crossed over the border into 



FIFTH BEOIMENT. 265 

Mexico, and waa appointed by the military authorities 
of that country a " Chef de Battalipn " in the ranks 
of the Liberal Party. "When Fort Sumter was fired 
upon he was stationed at El Fuerte in command of a 
large garrison. He at once resigned his position and 
made his way home, arriving in Kew York on the 18th 
of August, 1861. Arriving at Concord he offered his 
services to Governor Berry, and was commissioned 
Colonel of the Fifth Eegiment of Volunteer Infantry 
on the 27th of September, and left the State with his 
regiment, which had been enlisted, organized and made 
ready for the field under his own most active personal 
supervision, on the 29th of October. ISo regiment went 
to the seat of war from !N'ew Hampshire during the 
four years' struggle that promised greater usefulness 
to the Union cause than did what was soon designated 
and known throughout the army as the "Fighting 
Fifth," and none more nobly and fully realized all that 
was expected of it, and none from this or any other 
State has a prouder record to give to history. Its deeds 
of valor will be known and remembered as long as the 
great rebellion itself is remembered. In a communica- 
tion to Senator Hale, of ITew Hampshire, Gen. Hancock 
remarked : " The conduct of this regiment has been 
heroic : in the most important battles it has been highly 
distinguished. To Col. Cross nluch of this honor is 
due ; he has faithfully disciplined his Regiment, given 
it the highest tone, and always led it in battle. One 
of the most distinguished Generals in the army re- 
marked that "the Fifth Eegiment never changed its 
position under fire, except towards the enemy." On 
the morning of the battle of Antietam, after the regi- 
ment had crossed the Creek, they were halted and Col. 
Cross addressing them said : " Soldiers, the rebel army 
is in front; the Potomac is in their rear. We must 
whip the enemy this day or we shall all be disgraced and 



266 TEE GREAT REBELLION. ' 

ruined, I expect every officer and soldier to do his duty 
like a man. ISo one must leave the ranks unless badly 
wounded. If I fall leave me on the field until the 
fight is over. Stand firm and fire low." The regiment 
went immediately into the battle and fought with bra- 
very seldom excelled. Col. Cross. was struck by two 
pieces of shell; one over the right eye, and one on 
the left cheek, and his hat was knocked off, but with 
Ms wounds bleeding and a red silk handkerchief around 
his head he pushed forward, and the most desperate 
fighting ensued. On this occasion the Fifth Regiment 
saved Richardson's division from being outflanked. 
In a private letter written on the battle field, Col. Cross 
said : " My brave boys, knowing that all depended upon 
promptly checking the rebels, raised the wild Indian 
yell and poured an awful volley into their ranks. Their 
center regiment was literally smashed to pieces, and 
before they could rally their forces, several regiments 
hastened to my assistance. Then came the most terrific 
fighting. I had been in seven battles before, but they 
were nothing in comparison with Antietam. "We shot 
down the rebel color-bearers as fast as they could get 
up, killed their officers, broke their ranks and piled 
them in heaps among the tall corn. I never felt better 
in my life, and if the rebels didn't hear the Apache 
war-whoop that day it was not my fault, for I yelled it 
until I was hoarse. My men fought nobly, gloriously ; 
never wavered, never shrank. Not a man but the 
wounded and dead fell out. My officers also conducted 
themselves like heroes. As for myself I was hit five 
times but not seriously injured." 

At the disastrous battle of Fredericksburg, on the 
13th of December, 1862, the Fifth Regiment was again 
in the thickest of the fight, and lost in killed and 
wounded many of its best officers and bravest men. 
Col. Cross was again wounded by a piece of shell which 



FIFTH BEQIMENT. 267 

struck near the heart and he fell insensible. He was 
brought to his senses by another fragment of a shell 
which struck him on the left leg, below the knee. He 
attempted to crawl along, but a shell struck the steel 
scabbard of his saber, split it open and knocked him 
flat. In a letter describing the situation. Col. Cross 
afterward wrote : " Dizzy and faint, I had sense enough 
to lay myself out decently, ' feet to the foe.' Two lines 
passed over me, but soon they swayed back, trampling 
on the dead and dying. Halting about thirty yards in 
the rear, one line laid down and commenced firing. 
Imagine the situation. Right between two fires of bul- 
lets and shells — ^for our own artillery fire from over the 
river was mostly too short, and did great damage to our 
own troops — I lay on the field four hours — the most 
awfiil moments of my life. As the balls from our lines 
hissed over me within a foot from. my head, I covered 
my face with both hands, and counted rapidly from on-e 
to one hundred, expecting every moment my brains 
would spatter the ground. But they didn't. My guardi- 
an angels — if there be such personages — or my destiny 
saved me. The end of my days was reserved for 
another, and I hope a more fortunate occasion. For if 
I am to die on the battle-field, I pray that it may be 
with the cheers of victory in my ears. When it became 
dark, some of my men found me and I was carried to 
the hospital." 

The Fifth Regiment was in the battle of Gettysburg, 
on the 2d and 3d of July, 1863, and it was there that 
Col. Cross was mortally wounded. He was in command 
of a brigade, as he had been in several other hardly 
contested battles. At about six o'clock in the afternoon 
of the 2d, while rallying his brigade in the most gallant 
manner, in the streets of the town, a minnie ball entered 
the abdomen and came out near the spine, and after 
much suffering, during which he was fully conscious, at 



268 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

twelve o'clock he died. His last words were ; " I did 
hope I would live to see peace and our country restored. 
Thank Heaven, I have done my duty. I think the boys 
will miss me. Oh! welcome death! Say farewell to 
all." His remains were carried to his native town, 
Lancaster, where they were buried, the ceremonies 
being conducted by North Star Lodge of Free Masons. 
His funeral was attended by a very large concourse of 
citizens, most of whom had known the deceased from 
boyhood. 

COLONEL CHARLES B, HAPGOOD. 

Colonel Hapgood was born in Shrewsbury, Worcester 
County, Massachusetts, December 11, 1830. He is a son 
of Jacob and Elizabeth ( Eager ) Hapgood. His father 
was for thirty-five years a celebrated gun manufacturer, 
at Shrewsbury, and had sales rooms in Boston. Col. 
Hapgood was educated at the high school in his native 
town, and learned the trade of gun maker, with his 
father. In 1851 he went to Worcester, Mass., and was 
for seven years employed in one of the largest produce 
commission houses in that city. In 1854 he married 
Mary Elizabeth, daughter of Charles E. Miles, of 
Worcester. In 1858, he removed to Amherst, Hills- 
borough County, N'ew Hampshire, and in coihpany with 
H. E. Abbott, of Worcester, bought out the store of 
C. B. Tuttle, and entered into business there under the 
firm of Hapgood & Abbott, which he continued until 
September, 1861, when he disposed of his interest in 
the firm to his partner, with a view of entering the 
army. He once enlisted as a private, but for some rea- 
son was not mustered. On the 19th of October, 1861, 
he was commissioned Captain of Company I, in the 
Fifth Regiment New Hampshire Volunteers, and was 
continually with his regiment, sharing its hard marches. 



FIFTH REGIMENT. 269 

bloody battles and fatigue duty until -July 9, 1862, at 
which time, having contracted a fever, in the campaign 
before Richmond, he was given leave of absence on 
surgeon's certificate. Subsequently, and before the 
expiration of his leave, Capt. Hapgpod was ordered on 
recruiting service in New Hampshire^ and was stationed 
at Concord and other places.- On the 14th of December, 
1862, immediately after the battle of Fredericksburg, in 
which the Fifth Regiment suffered so severely in the 
loss of officers and men. Captain Hapgood was promoted 
to Lieutenant Colonel, and at his own urgent request 
was ordered to join his regiment, which he did on the 
3d of February, 1863. He commanded the regiment in 
the campaign to Chancellorsville and in the great fight 
at Gettysburg, on the 2d and 3d of July, 1863. On the 
3d of July 1863, he was promoted to Colonel of his 
regiment, in place of Colonel Cross, killed in battle. 
He was continuously with his regiment until June 16, 
1864, when he was severely wounded at the battle of 
Petersburg. After he had partially recovered from his 
wound. Col. Hapgood was ordered to Philadelphia, 
August 18, 1864, by the War Department, as President 
of the Board of Inspection of Military Hospitals in the 
State of Pennsylvania. He remained on this duty until 
October 17, 1864, when he was mustered out by order 
of the War Department, by reason of expiration of his 
term of service. 

Col. Hapgood returned to N^ew Hampshire after being 
mustered out of service, in a feeble state of health, from 
his wound and the fatiguing duty of his three years' 
service with one of the most active regiments in the 
army. He was offered and urged to accept the command 
of other regiments, and also honorable and responsible 
positions on the staff of different Major Generals, all of 
which, from his enfeebled state of health, and for other 
reasons, he felt it his duty to decline. Soon after his 



270 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

return home he removed to Boston and entered as a 
partner into a substantial mercantile firm, and is now 
doing an extensive and successM business as a wool 
commission merchant in that city, under the firm name 
of Charles E. Hapgood & Co. 

Feeling that hi§ country needed him in her time of 
peril, when the constitution and laws were set at defiance, 
and the Union itself was threatened with destruction by 
misguided men at the South, Col. Hapgood entered the 
military service with the most unselfish and patriotic 
motives and sentiments, and performed every duty from 
first to last faithfully and religiously. As a Christian 
gentleman he enjoyed the unbounded respect and confi- 
dence of the men under and officers over him. As an 
officer he was brave, discreet, mindful of the comfort of 
the men in the field, and watchful and tender of sick 
and wounded in hospital, and set an example to all of 
sobriety and probity worthy of imitation. 

MAJOR EDWARD B. STURTEVANT. 

The following biographical notice of Major Sturte- 
vant is taken from the Adjutant General's Report of 
1865, and is eminently deserved, just and true: In the 
Spring of 1861, when the nation called for the services 
of her sons. Major Edward E. Sturtevant was the first 
man from l^Tew Hampshire to enlist in our second war 
for independence; and was also the first man in this 
State to receive authority to recruit under the President's 
call for seventy-five thousand three months' men. His 
biographical record is brief, but honorable in the highiest 
degree. He was born in Keene, August 7, 1826. His 
parents, George W. and Fanny "W. Sturtevant are now 
living. The deceased was bred to the occupation of a 
printer in his native town ; but removed to Concord 
soon after completing his apprenticeship, and found 



FIFTH REOIMENT. 271 

employment in the office of the ISew Hampshire Courier, 
then in charge of John C. "Wilson, Esq., in whom he 
found a generous and faithful friend. He was subse- 
quently employed in the office of the Statesman, and at 
a later period upon the columns of the Washington 
Union, and the Richmond Dispatch, everywhere estab- 
lishing a good name as a practical printer. 

He was naturally, however, of too active and venture- 
some a spirit to be content with any sedentary employ- 
ment, and in 1855 he accepted an appointment as one 
of the police force for the city of Concord, in which 
capacity he won an enviable reputation for shrewdness, 
fidelity and pluck. He held this position until the 
inauguration of civil war. Dropping without a mo- 
ment's hesitation the pursuits of civil life, he was imme- 
diately appointed a recruiting officer, and in a few days, 
by his own personal influence and example, he enlisted 
two hundred and twenty-six men and received a com- 
missioA as Captain in the First Regiment of If ew Hamp- 
shire Volunteer Infantry. 

Major Sturtevant was influenced in taking up arms, 
mainly by a correct and thorough appreciation of the 
great principles which were at issue. He had, however, 
a natural fondness and aptitude for military life. In 
former years he marched at the head of the militia of 
the State capital, where he was often especially com- 
mended for the drill and discipline of his command. 
But Major Sturtevant was no holiday soldier. He had 
little fondness for parade and show. His spirit chafed 
at the inactivity which characterized the bloodless cam- 
paign of the First New Hampshire, and immediately on 
the expiration of his first term of service, he was ready 
again to take the field. He felt that he had enlisted for 
the war. In all his letters to his friends, he manifested 
no weariness nor impatience in the service to which he 
had devoted his energies — no thought of turning his 



272 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

back to the enemy till death or victory released him 
from personal obligation to his beloved country. 

On the organization of the "Fighting Fifth "-^an 
honorable epithet which the deceased did his fall share 
to win and maintain — ^he was commissioned as Captain 
of Company A. During the protracted and harassing 
fatigue-duty of this gallant regiment, on every toilsome 
march, in every battle and skirmish, up to the hour of 
his death. Major Sturtevant was with his command. 
Could his nameless grave be identified, it could wear no 
fitter, no prouder inscription than " the Rappahannock, 
Yorktown, Fair Oaks, Peach Orchard, Savage's Station, 
White Oak Swamp, Charles City Cross Roads, Malvern 
Hill, South Mountain, Antietam, Charlestown, Freder- 
icksburgh." 

During the " seven days fight," he was in command 
of his regiment, and handled his men with conspicuous 
bMU and gallantry. Upon the resignation of Major 
Cook, in July, 1862, he received merited promotion, and 
still further distinction awaited him at the hour of his 
untimely death. 'Eo mtin more richly deserved it. In 
point of courage, personal endurance and capacity for 
securing at once the obedience and affection of his men, 
he had no superior in his regiment. On the skirmish 
line and on dangerous picket duty, he especially distin- 
guished himself. While his regiment was building .the 
" Grape Vine Bridge" over the Chickahominy, Major 
Sturtevant's company alone covered their important 
undertaking. Again, in the brief lull during the battle 
of Fair Oaks, his command was nearest the enemy. 
From South Mountain to Antietam, and again in Mc- 
Clellan's advance on Charlestown, he led the skirmish 
line. He loved this dangerous service. The excitement, 
the freedom from restraint, appealed irresistibly to his 
adventurous spirit; and his shrewdness, fertility in 



FIFTS REGIMENT. 273 

resources and strong hold on the affections of his men 
abundantly fitted him for the position. 

He entered upon the battle of Fredericksburg, acting 
as Lieut. Colonel, with sad presentiments and yet with 
cheerful alacrity. The event justified his mournful 
expectations. The Fifth left scores of her bravest and 
best men on that blood-stained field; but none braver, 
none more imbued with generous impulses and manly 
devotion than Major Edward E. Sturtevant. The man- 
ner of his death — ^the place of his burial is unknown. 
"We know only -that he was seen on that fatal field at 
dark, severely wounded by a minnie ball ; that he was 
buried where he would have chosen to be interred — on 
the field where he fell, among the nameless heroes whose 
interests he had ever made his own. As has well 
been said, " a braver man or more faithful friend, never 
yielded up his spirit amidst the clangor of arms and the 
wail of the dying. Peace to his memory," 

All the field ofiicers of the Fifth Regiment were men 
of military experience and skill. Col. Cross had seen 
service in fighting the Indians in Arazona and the far 
"West, and had recently returned from an important 
military command in Mexico. Lieut. Colonel Langley 
had been promoted from Adjutant of the Second Regi- 
ment, with which he was in the first Bull Run battle ; 
and Major Cook had held important commissions in the 
Volunteer Militia of Massachusetts, and was an accom- 
plished officer. The other officers of the staff and line 
had been selected for their peculiar qualifications for the 
positions in which they were placed. Thus organized 
the regiment gave promise of efficiency in the discharge 
of any duty that might be put upon it in the great war 
in which the country was engaged. 

The regiment left Concord on the 29th of October, 
and arrived at Bladensburg, Md., on the 31st, and went 



274 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

into camp. On tlie 3d of l^ovember, in the midst of a 
rain, with roads in a very bad condition, the regiment 
formed a portion, of Gen. Howard's Brigade ordered to 
Lower Marlborough, Md. They marched a distance of 
about fifty miles in two days, and after one day of rest, 
marched back over the same ground, and again went 
into camp at Bladensburg. 

On the 27th of November the regiment marched 
across Long Bridge into Virginia, with Howard's Brig- 
ade, and was assigned to General Sumner's Division, 
and went into camp near Alexandria, at a place which 
was afterward known as Camp California. Here the 
regiment went into winter quarters, where they remain- 
ed until the 10th of March. The regiment soon com- 
menced doing picket and out-post duty at the front, 
and established the first line of pickets fronting the 
enemy at Fairfax Court House. The men were thor- 
oughly drilled in regimental and brigade drill and in 
bayonet exercise. The commissioned officers were 
also thoroughly instructed in the practical part of their 
duties. Schools were established by the Colonel and 
Lieutenant Colonel for the theoretical instruction of 
officers and sergeants, during the winter evenings. A 
" common school" for such boys in the regiment as 
needed instruction in the elementary branches, was also 
put in operation — the necessary books being donated by 
the Sanitary Commission. 

Through the winter the regiment furnished heavy 
details to build roads, repair bridges and cut timber. 
Measles and mumps prevailed to an extraordinary 
extent, yet from six to eight hundred men were all the 
time fit for duty, which was more than any other regi- 
ment in the entire Division could turn out. 

On the 10th of March the Fifth Eegiment formed the 
advance guard of Sumner's Division, when it moved 
from Camp California on Manassas, Major Cook com- 



FIFTH REaiMENT. 275 

manding the skirmish line. The march to Warrenton 
was a severe one and very trying to the men, the weather 
being cold, much of the time rainy, and the roads in 
the most despicable condition, and almost impassable 
for the men, to say nothing of baggage trains. They 
had no tents, wagons or cooking utensils. These hard- 
ships were endured for thirty-one days, and yet there 
were but very few men in the regiment not fit for duty. 
On the 28th of March Gen. Howard commanded a 
reconnoissance in force from Warrenton Junction to the 
Rappahannock River, eight miles, for the purpose of 
forcing the enemy to cross the river and burn the rail- 
road bridge. The Fifth formed the advance, Lieut. 
Colonel Langley commanding the skirmish line. The 
enemy were driven all day, the bridge and railroad 
depot burned, and the rebel forces shelled out of their 
position. Here the regiment first came under fire — the 
skirmish line from the enemy's riflemen, and the main 
body from shot and shell. The behavior of the Fifth on 
this expedition and its important service, gained great 
praise from the commander of the forces. 

On the 4th of April the regiment embarked at Alex- 
andria for the Peninsula, without having returned to 
Camp California for tents and regimental property. On 
reaching Ship Point the men were obUged to wade from 
the vessel to the shore, and camp on the wet ground, 
without tents. The regiment detailed daily about three 
hundred men to work making corduroy road through 
a swamp, and building bridges, in which the men 
showed such good qualities as to be highly compli- 
mented by the Geneial in command. "When the siege 
of Yorktown commenced the Fifth was sent to join the 
Engineer's Brigade, under General "Woodbury, with 
which they performed much heavy work. They built 
a tower one hundred feet high and forty feet 'base, of 
heavy timber, for an observatory at General Headquar- 



276 THE ORE AT REBELLION. 

ters whicli was about completed when the enemy evacu- 
ated Yorktown, 

The next day after the evacuation of Yorktown the 
regiment marched for Williamsburg. They started just 
at dark, in the midst of a severe rainstorm, the roads 
being in the worst' possible condition. A halt was not 
made until near morning, when the tired men dropped 
down in the mud to sleep. News came that the battle 
had been won, that the enemy were in retreat, and the 
regiment marched back to Yorktown, whence on the 
11th of May they embarked on the steamer C. Vander- 
bilt, and were carried up York river to "West Point, and 
from thence marched to the Chickahominy river and 
went into camp. Here amid the pestilential vapors and 
miasma of the swamps many of the men grew sick, and 
several died. On the 28th Col. Cross was ordered to 
construct a bridge across the Chickahominy swamp and 
river, capable of bearing artillery and wagons. A Min- 
nesota regiment had commenced the work on the previ- 
ous day, but had been ordered away. The swamp was 
flooded from one to four feet deep with water ,^and 
nearly half a mile wide. On one border was the chan- 
nel of the stream, over thirty yards wide and quite deep. 
The swamp was a mass of huge trees, vines, brushwood, 
and old wrecks of trees and shrubbery. The labor was 
vigorously begun, and with some assistance from small 
detachments from two '!Sew York regiments, the bridge 
was built. It was supported by piers composed of heavy 
logs, and sevenV rods in length. It was completed 
before dark on the 30th— just in time for Sumner's Corps 
to cross the next day, in season for Sedgwick's Division 
to check the enemy. It was afterward known as' 
" Grape-vine bridge," and was the only one on the river 
above Bottom's bridge which successfally resisted the 
current swollen by rains; and on the 31st of May it 
bore, in their passage across, its builders, as they hurried 



FIFTH EFGIMFNT. 277 

to the field of Fair Oaks. During the night the enemy 
were discovered within three hundred yards, and the 
regiment took several prisoners. At daylight Col. Cross 
captured a rebel courier with important dispatches. 

On the morning of the 1st of June two or three hun- 
dred rebels were discovered close to the right flank, 
whom the skirmish line of the Fifth drove out on the 
run, — and thus opened the great battle of Fair Oaks, on 
the Ist of June, 1862. Eichardson's division moved 
forward to engage the enemy, and the lines meeting, 
the most terrible conflict ensued ; one after another all 
the other regiments of the division became engaged, 
and still the enemy held his position, until, at last, word 
came to Col. Cross that General Howard was wounded, 
and he was in command of the brigade, and the Fifth 
was wanted. The Colonel formed hia line squarely in 
rear of the spot where the fight was hottest, and as 
the line engaged in front retired, moved it forward 
through a swamp, over the rebel skirmish line, into a 
thick pine wood, where the rebel line lay, waiting for 
a new line to demolish. The Fifth immediately opened 
fire upon the enemy, and from eight hundred rifles 
death sped to the rebel ranks. The intensity of the 
musketry exceeded that of any the regiment ever 
heard afterward, and for twenty minutes, the bullets 
flew through the woods, when they missed the human 
marks, splintering and severing the trees and branches 
for hundreds of yards. Col. Cross was wounded in the 
thigh, and Major Cook was struck by a bullet in the 
leg, and one hundred and eighty-six had been killed 
and wounded, when the rebels gave way and left the 
Fifth in possession of the field. The dead of the Fifth 
lay within thirty yards of the rebel dead. Thus ended 
the battle of Fair Oaks, with twenty minutes' work 
of our regiment. The Fifth fired the first and last 
shot in this great battle, and suffered as much loss as 



278 THE OBEAT REBELLION. 

any reginieut upon the field. 'Sow under command of 
Lieut. Col. Langley, the regiment went into the trenches 
before Richmond, where it remained for a month, and 
afterward retreated with the rest of the army to Har- 
rison's Landing, fighting and skii'mishing at Savage 
Station, Peach Orchard, White Oak Swamp, Charles 
City, and Malvern Hill, in all of which the regiment 
lost over one hundred officers and men. Lieut. Colonel 
Langley being sick, the regiment was commanded inost 
of the time by Capt. Sturtevant, and behaved well on 
all occasions. 

From Harrison's Landing the Fifth marched to New- 
port News, where Col. Cross joined them and assumed 
command. The regiment soon sailed to Alexandria, 
landed, and marched to its old locality, Camp Califor- 
nia, where it arrived on the night of the 28th of August. 
On the 29th the Fifth marched to Arlington Heights, 
where the men, ragged and battered, and many without 
shoes or blankets, hoped as they pitched their tents in 
sight of "Washington, to be permitted to rest and be 
clothed; but on the 30th, the sounds of artillery being 
heard in the direction of Manassas, hurried orders were 
received in the afternoon, to leave all tents and blankets, 
and march, to re-enforce Gen. Pope. They marched 
twenty-three miles with only one halt, and then laid 
down in the rain, on wet ground to rest. Some of the 
men had no shoes, and their feet were blistered and 
bleeding. The next day they were marched to the 
front, and formed the skirmish line in face of the ene- 
my ; which position they held until the entire army 
moved away, when they fell back and joined the main 
body at Fairfax Cotirt House, being the last regiment 
that left Centerville, , From this place the regiment 
marched to within a short distance of Chain Bridge, 
twenty-six miles, without a single straggler. The next 
day they marched into Maryland and camped at Ten- 



FIFTH BEQIMENT. 279 

allytown, where a few shoes and some clothing were 
obtained for the men. On the 4th of September the 
regiment marched to Frederick, Md. After marching 
through Frederick they camped near the battle-ground 
of South Mountain but were held in reserve during 
the battle. 

BATTLE OF ANTIETAM. 

On the 15th of September Richardson's Division, of 
which the New Hampshire Fifth Regiment formed a 
part, crossed the South Mountain, in pursuit of the 
enemy. The Fifth was ordered to the front and deploy- 
ed as skirmishers. In this position they drove in the 
cavalry of the enemy and discovered the rebel line of 
battle beyond Antietam river. In the pursuit the regi- 
ment captured over sixty prisoners, and Col. Cross said 
they might have taken more, but he could not spare the 
men to pursue them. All the remainder of the day 
and until late at night, the Fifth engaged the enemy's 
sharpshooters, driving them from a strong position. 
When relieved the men were nearly exhausted. The 
next day four companies were sent to hold the enemy's 
riflemen in check, and prevent their burning an impor- 
tant bridge over the Antietam river, while other compa- 
nies were sent to destroy obstructions in the river. On 
the 17th, the day of the great battle, the Fifth went 
into the fight with three hundred rifles and nineteen 
commissioned officers. The regiment behaved nobly, 
and in the language of the official report "was entitled 
to the sole credit of discovering and defeating the 
attempt of the enemy to turn the left flank of Richard- 
son's Division. They captured the large state colors of 
the Fourth North Carolina Regiment in this fight, and 
by permission of the "War Department, it is now depos- 
ited in our own State. It was seized by Corporal 
Nettleton, of Claremont, who although wounded. 



280 THE ORE AT REBELLION. 

brought them off the field. For this act of bravery he 
was promoted to Lieutenant, and was mortally wounded 
at the battle 'of Fredericksburg, on the 13th of Decem- 
ber, and died of his wounds a few days afterward. 
During the battle the Fifth, being hardly pressed and 
Lfl:airs assuming a desperate character, Col. Cross, his 
face streaming with blood from wounds in his forehead, 
and blackened with powder, and his head bound round 
with a red handkerchief, hurrying to every part of , the 
line, bade the men "put on the war paint," by rubbing 
the torn ends of the cartridges over their faces ; and 
then calling for the "war-whoop," he raised his own 
voice into the battle cry, and was followed by every 
man, until the sound rose above that of artillery and 
musketry, carrying defiance to foe and encouragement 
to friend. The men plied the rammers, and fired as fast 
as possible, and "fire!" "fire!" "fire faster!" rang along 
the line from the ofiicers. Men became almost frantic ; 
.guns could not be loaded fast enough; those of the 
wounded were seized and eveh the arms were taken 
from the hands of the rebel dead and discharged at the 
heads of their living comrades. A rebel standard bearer 
waved his flag defiantly vnthin a few yards. " Shoot the 
man with the flag !" shouted twenty voices, and he was 
leveled to the dust with his flag. Still they pressed on, 
and more desperate grew the chances, when Col. Mc- 
Kean, of the Eighty-first Pennsylvania, seeing the situa- 
tion of the Fifth, brought his regiment from the right, 
of his own accord, and forming in a line with the Fifth, 
opened a roaring fire* of " buck and ball," on the enemy, 
which, with the unceasing fire of the Fifth, speedily drove 
the enemy off. Soon after the Fifth, being sadly cut up 
and very tired, was relieved, and placed in a position 
further to the left, behind the crest. During the after- 
noon the regiment lay under severe artillery fire, which 
the enemy continued on the left of the line, during 



FIPTS REQIMENT. 281 

which its beloved commander, General Eichardson, was 
mortally wounded while directing the fire of a battery. 
He had been among the bravest of the brave, and had 
charged on foot, sword in hand, with the front line. 
He was succeeded by General Hancock, who of all 
others, perhaps, could best fill his place. The battle 
raged from the right of the line to the left, where Burn- 
side was engaged, at intervals, until night; but the 
Fifth was not again called on. On the 18th it was only 
employed in skirmishing. A detachment of recruits 
fresh from New Hampshire, arrived on the field, and 
Ool. Cross caused them to arm themselves from the 
slain. On the 19th the rebels had retreated. 

In this battle over one hundred thousand men and 
five hundred pieces of artillery had been engaged on 
both sides, with a loss to the enemy of near fifteen 
thousand men, a number of guns and colors, and a loss 
on the Union side of twelve thousand four hundred and 
pixty men, and not a gun or color. From three hundred 
and nineteen officers and men of the Fifth, who went 
into the fight, one hundred and eight had been killed 
and wounded. Among the killed was Second Lieut. 
George A. Gay, a gallant young officer, lately promoted 
for meritorious conduct,. Among the wounded was 
Second Lieut. Charles "W". Bean, a young officer of great 
promise, who died of his wounds soon after. Gen. 
McClellan, in his report of operations, highly compli- 
mented Col. Cross and his regiment, by a personal 
notice. It was in this battle that ,the regiment earned 
the title of " The Fighting Fifth." * 

On the 21st Gen. Hancock's Division encamped on 
Boliver Heights, and 'during the rest of September and 
nearly all of October, the Fifth remained inactive, with 
the exception of marching on one reconnoissance to 
Charlestown, Va., in which it came under fire for a few 
niinutes. The time was employed in drill and picket 



282 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

duty, and the regiment was once more fally clothed and 
equipped. Major Cook resigned on account of wounds, 
and Capt. Sturtevant of Company A, was promoted to 
Major, his commission dating from July 3, 1862. 

The Fifth had now been in the service a year, and a 
most eventful year it had been During the year the 
regiment had received one hundred and forty-six re- 
cruits, making the total strength for that period eleven 
hundred and fifty-six. Two officers had been killed and 
seventeen wounded. Sixty men had lost their lives in 
battle ; two hundred and forty had been wounded, and 
sixteen were missing, making the whole loss in battle 
three hundred and thirty-five. Sixty-nine died of disease, 
twelve officers resigned, four were dismissed, one hun- 
dred and thirty-five men were discharged, and fifty-one 
had deserted. Of the eleven hundred and fifty-six who 
had belonged to the regiment during the year, four hun- 
dred and forty-nine had been lost in various ways ; and 
of the seven hundred and seven remaining on the rolls 
but three hundred and twenty-three were present for 
duty. 

On the 29th of October the march was taken up, and 
the division moved across the Shenandoah and down 
the Loudon Valley. On the 3d of l^Tovember the Fifth 
Regiment came under fire at Snicker's Oap, and about 
the 14th the tents were pitched at Falmouth. Log huts 
were built and covered with tents, and the regiment 
once more went into winter quarters. 

BATTLE OF FRBDERIOKSBUR&. 

On the 11th of December the Second Corps was 
massed opposite Fredericksburg, and a portion of it 
effected a crossing under a severe fire from the enemy's 
infantry among the houses in the city. On the 12th 
the whole Corps had crossed on pontoon bridges, which 
had been thrown over the Rappahannock river, in the 



FIFTH BEOIMENT. 283 

face of the fire of shai-pshooters and infantry. On the 
morning of the 13th commenced the great battle of 
Fredericksburg, which proved so disastrous to our 
troops under Gen. Burnside, and in which the Eifth 
New Hampshire Regiment lost many of its bravest and 
best men. Hancock's Division charged across the plain 
toward the heights where the rebels were strongly 
intrenched, under a destructive fire, while our artil- 
lery on the opposite side of the river were throwing 
shell and solid shot into the town. The advantage was 
with the rebels from the first; for their batteries, 
securely covered by works on the heights, poured the 
most accurate and rapid fire through the advancing 
lines on the plain — ^the shots often flying into the streets 
of the city, or striking the houses and scattering the 
bricks, spread death into the ranks, long before they 
were within musket shot ; while there were no batteries 
opposed which could silence them. The infantry, be- 
hind a stone wall, could not be materially harmed by 
our bullets or shells, and the only hope of success on 
our side was to reach and dislodge them with the bayo- 
net. Vainly did the brave men of Hancock's Division 
strive to accomplish this work, but its ranks melted 
away ; the colors were repeatedly leveled, and the ofli- 
cera were stricken down, until but the shattered rem- 
nants of its battalions, unable to close their ranks or 
re-form their lines, defiantly and desj)erately lay down 
in the position they had attained, and there their colors 
waved until night's pitying shades fell over the field 
and obscured the unwavering marks of shot, shell and 
bullets. The Fifth was in the front line, and sustained 
the full fiiry of the fire. A shell burst in front of Col. 
Cross, and he fell, apparently lifeless. Major Sturte- 
vant was mortally wounded, and died upon the field. 
The regiment swept on in the stern ardor to win the 
fight. In Major Sturtevant the regiment lost an honest, 



284 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

earnest patriot and soldier, and one wlio would share 
Jus blanket and his last crust with a fellow soldier. 
The colors of the regiment were shot down again and 
again ; alternately upraised by a sergeant, a corporal, 
a private, or an officer ; and in their heroic effiarts to 
keep the line closed and advancing, and the colors up, 
fell three captains — the valiant Mui'ray, the noble Perry, 
and the young and courageous Moore. Lieut. Nettleton, 
who was promoted at Antietam, was mortslUy wounded, 
and Lieut. Little,"returning from home, where he had 
been recovering from wounds, arrived on that fatal day,^ 
just as the regiment was moving forward, and hurried 
to join his company only to receive a mortal wound. 
The survivors of the re^ment reached a corn-field, 
within a few rods of the enemy, and these — a mere 
skirmish line — held their ground ; and among the fore- 
most Lieut. Ballou, an accomplished gentleman and 
brave officer, met his death. When night came the 
regiment moved to the city, without one hundred and 
eighty-six officers and men who had marched out in 
the morning to fall victims to a most unfortunate blun- 
der. Col. Cross was carried from the field, and subse- 
quently recovered from his wounds to die upon the 
field of Gettysburg. 

After the battle of Fredericksburg, and under cover 
of darkness, the division recrossed the river and went 
into camp at Falniouth, and the Fifth Eegiment employ- 
ed the succeeding months in picket duty, drill and 
recruiting its shattered strength. Col. Cross, after an 
absence of several weeks returned to the regiment with 
a set of new colors, to replace the old ones which were 
sent home. lieturning officers and men raised the 
number to near two hundred, and the regiment, which 
had resembled a company after the Fredericksburg 
battle, started on the spring campaign of 1863 with the 
semblance of a battalion. 



FIFTH REQIMUNT. 285 

Captain Charles E. Hapgood was promoted to Lievit 
Colonel, December 14, 1862, in place of Lieut. Colonel 
Langley, resigned, and Captain Kichard E. Cross was 
promoted to Major on^the same date, in place of Major 
Sturtevant, killed in battle. Early in January, 1863, 
Gen. Hooker succeeded Gen. Burnside in the command 
of the army, and reorganization and refitting were the 
order of the day. 

In the latter part of April, 1863, the Fifth Regiment 
was moved up the Rappahannock river, and distributed 
at the houses through the country in the vicinity of 
Banks' Eord, for the purpose of preventing communica- 
tion between the people and the enemy during the 
movements of the army preliminary to its passage 
across the river. The Fifth occupied twenty-seven 
houses. 

On the first of May the Fifth, with two other regi- 
ments, which had been performing similar duty, marched 
under the command of Col. Cross as a provisional brig- 
ade, arriving on the field during the progress of the 
action at the Chancellorsville House, and was at once 
placed in the line of battle. At night they slept upon 
their arms, and the next morning the Fifth supported a 
battery, the men lying between the guns. Later in the 
day a skirmish line under command of Colonel Miles, of 
the Sixty-first N'ew York Regiment in which a detail 
of the Fifth was posted, performed the extraordinary 
feat of repelling an attack of the enemy in column ; 
and toward evening, when the Eleventh Corps was 
routed by the enemy, and sent flying across the plain, 
sixty of the fugitives were caught by the Fifth, and 
retained in the ranks, and some of them were afterward 
killed or wounded. During the afternoon of the 3d the 
army retired to a position nearer the river, and during 
its movements to Col. Cross was given the arduous and 
desperate duly of holding the enemy in check at the 



286 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

Chancellorsville House, until it was accomplished. The 
enemy approached on the front, the flank and the rear, 
and threatened to envelope the small brigade which was 
in his path ; but under a severe £re it held its ground 
steadfastly, wheeling or facing to each point, as it was 
assailed. A battery which was left with the brigade, 
having lost its officers and nearly all its men and horses, 
was silenced by the severe fire of the enemy, when Col. 
Cross himself sighted and fired a piece at the approach- 
ing enemy, and was about to man the battery by men 
from the Fifth, when his brigade was ordered to follow 
the army, and the battery was brought away by hand. 
The enemy closed rapidly on the retiring column, and 
for some time shot and shell crashed through with 
destructive effect. A short distance to the rear a new 
line was taken up, where, in hastily constructed earth 
works, the army remained until the 5th, when it re- 
crossed the Eappahannoek, and although withdrawn, it 
has never acknowledged itself whipped in that battle. 
The Fifth lost nearly forty officers and men. Another 
stay of a month was made at Falmouth, the time being 
employed in preparing for the summer campaign, which 
opened in June. 

On the 9th of June a detail of a hundred and thirty 
men from the Fifth Regiment formed a part of the 
picket force of infantry which accompanied the cavalry 
of the army on a reconnoissance in force across the 
Eappahannoek. Colonel Cross commanded the detail 
from the Second Corps, which arrived at Kelley's Ford 
in the evening. Instructions were issued for the infantry 
to cross and drive the enemy away on the other side, to 
protect the crossing of the cavalry. The passage was 
effected in canvas boats before light on the next morn- 
ing, by Col. Cross' command, and the enemy were 
driven away by a skirmish line. 

The cavalry crossed and pushed for Brandy Station, 



FIFTH BEaiMENT. 287 

when there speedily ensued one of the memorable cav- 
alry battles of the war. Col. Cross' command rejoined 
its corps in a few days, and with it moved up to Thor- 
oughfare Gap, and from thence across the Potomac at 
Edward's Perry, through Poolsville, Md., to Frederick 
City. Gen. Couch was relieved and Gen. Hancock 
assumed command of the Corps, which placed Gen. 
Caldwell in command of the division and Col. Cross in 
command of the brigade — the command of the regiment 
devolved upon Lieut. Colonel Hapgood. On the 29th 
the re^ment marched thirty-two miles, and on the 1st 
of July reached the field of Gettysburg. 

BATTLE OF GETTYSBURG. 

On the morning of the 2d of July, the brigade took 
position in the line, on that well remembered crest, in 
open field, where it remained until five o'clock in the 
afternoon, when it moved toward Round Top. The 
Pifth, detached from the brigade for a short time to 
hold a road, rejoined it at six o'clock, to enter at once 
into the fight which raged on the right of Eound Top. 
The whole of Gen. Caldwell's division became engaged 
in a very sanguinary conflict, in which the rebels strove 
to drive the line back, and thereby envelope the left 
flank of the army. The Pifth stood its ground unflinch- 
ingly, and Col. Cross, ever solicitous for its good 
conduct, came from the center of the brigade to its 
front, and there encouraging his men, he fell mortally 
wounded by a bullet in the abdomen, and was 'carried 
oflFthe field. The regiment fired away all its ammunition 
but five rounds, and then being relieved, was among the 
last to leave the field. It was immeditely placed in sup- 
port of a battery, where it remained until about nine 
o'clock in the evening, when it rejoined the brigade, 
and resumed its position of the morning. 



288 TEE OBEAT REBELLION. 

On th.e morning of the 3d the regiment constructed 
a line of rude intrftndiments, and in them lay under 
the tremendous artillery fire of the day from the 
enemy's batteries, and during the attack of their in- 
fantry, which was so terribly repulsed. Its skirmishers 
'took thirty prisoners, and the regiment was first to 
discover the retreat of the enemy. On the 6th the 
regiment marched from the field, leaving four officers 
and eighty-two men killed and wounded, out of twelve 
officers and one hundred and sixty-fiye men who went 
into the fight. What remained of the Fifth marched 
down the Loudon Valley to Warrenton, and then it was 
ordered to Point Lookout, Md., on the 26th ; but at 
Washington the destination was changed to Concor4, 
N. H., where it reported at draft rendezvous, on the 3d 
of August. During a stay at Concord of nearly three 
months the regiment was recruited to the minimum 
strength, and Lieut. Colonel Hapgood was promoted 
to Colonel, Major Cross to Lieut. Colonel, and Captain 
Larkin, of Company A, to Major. The regiment again 
left the State for the seat of war early in November, 
reached Point Lookout on the 13th, and was placed 
Under command of Brigadier General Gilman Marston, 
in company with the Second and Twelfth New Hamp- 
shire Eegiments, and employed in guarding rebel 
prisoners confined at that place. 

On the 27th of May, 1864, the regiment again marched 
for the field, and joined the brigade commanded by 
Col. Miles, in the Second Army Corps, on the 1st of 
June. The army was then in the midst of that grand 
campaign from the Kapidan to the James, and on the 
night of the arrival, the Fifth marched with its Corps 
and reached Cold Harbor in the evening of the next 
day, and threw up a line of breastworks. Li the geneiral 
assault on the enemy's works on the 3d, the Fifth 
moved forward about half a mile, under a severe fire, 



FIFTH BEQIMENT. 289 

at the double quick, but refrained from firing a shot 
until it had carried the works in its front and captured 
one gun and a number of prisoners. The pursuit of 
the enemy followed at once, and continued for three 
hundred yards, when the regiment alone met a fresh 
line of the enemy, and engaged it at short range. A 
fierce struggle followed, in which the only hope of vic- 
tory was based upon the probability of the seasonable 
arrival of supports, as the enemy brought an overpower- 
ing force to bear upon the regiment ; but those on the 
flank had failed to break through the rebel lines, and 
the enemy remaining in their front turned fiercely on 
its flank, and, aided by those who had surrendered, 
treacherously taking up arms and firing into its rear, 
compelled it to retire, desperately striving to retain each 
foot of ground. But bravery and valor were unavail- 
ing, and the works were relinquished, though the fight 
did not cease until the last man was over, and Capt. 
Ricker was seen to stop, and with one cut of his sword 
Mil a rebel gunner in the midst of his section. Captain 
Goodwin, an officer of lion heart and noble bearing, 
was killed inside the works. Lieutenant Humphrey, a 
young and gallant officer, was killed between the lines, 
and Lieutenant Spaulding received a wound through 
the lungs, which caused his death afterward. He was 
a brave soldier and an honorable man. The total loss 
of the regiment in this engagement was two hundred 
and two officers and men. The recruits in the regiment 
showed great courage and steadiness throughout this 
whole affair, and were commended on all sides. A new 
line of , works was constructed close to the enemy, and 
in them the regiment constantly suffered losses from the 
unremittent fire of the enemy, until the 12th of June. 
The march was resumed and the James River was 
crossed on the 15th, and on the 16th the Fifth again 
went into action, on the right of its division, in the 



290 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

attack on the enemy's works at Petersburg, in whidi 
it lost thirty officers and men, MUed and wounded. 
Among the killed was Lieutenant Shapleigh, a reliable 
and esteemed officer. Colonel Hapgood was among the 
wounded, and the command of the regiment devolved 
on Major Larkin, under whom it moved out of the 
works on the 17th, in line of battle, and performing the 
manoeuvre, always difficult under fire, of changing front, 
moved up close to the enemy's works, and there, for two 
hours and a half, standing on a rise of ground, and 
completely exposed, maintained so accurate and rapid a 
fire on the enemy that his line was unable to remain 
standing in the works. One hundred and sixty rounds 
of ammunition per man were expended before the reg- 
iment was ordered to desist. The loss was twenty-nine 
killed and wounded. On the 18th seven men were lost 
in gaining a position on the Norfolk Railroad, and on 
the 21st the regiment aided in repelling an attack of the 
enemy on the works near the Jerusalem Plank Road. 
From the 24th of June to the 13th of July the -Fifth 
was Jcept in the works on picket, and in support of the 
cavalry ; after which time, until July 26th, it was em- 
ployed in the various operations of the siege. 

On the 27th of July the Fifth, with its brigade, was 
engaged in the action at Deep Bottom, and captured a 
line of works from the enemy, with four guns and a 
number of prisoners. The regiment received commen- 
dation from Gen. Hancock, commanding the Corps, in 
general orders, for its good conduct in the movements 
across the James. On the 30th, Captain Butler, of 
Company K, who while serving on the staff of Maj. 
Gen. "W. F. Smith, was wounded in an action near the 
Hare House, on the 30th, of June, died from his wound, 
after arriving home. He was an officer much respected 
for his valor and other soldierly and gentlemanly 
qualities. 



FIFTH BEQIMENT. 291 

On the 13th of August another march was made 
across the James river, and the Fifth with its Corps, 
was again engaged with the enemy near Charles City 
Cross Roads, the scene of one of the battles of 1862. 
The Second Corps recrossed the James, and moved out 
on the Weldon Railroad, tearing lip and destroying it 
to Ream's Station, where the enemy was again encoun- 
tered. The line of battle, formed in a half circle, was 
broken through by a sudden attack of the enemy, and 
Miles' brigade, enveloped on one flank, was driven back, 
leaving some artillery ; but its invincible commander 
led his men forward again without delay, and the Fifth 
rescued the only guns which were saved on the field. 
The regiment lost thirty-three of its number, among 
whom was Lieut. Robert H. Chase, killed. He was a 
young officer lately promoted, who as a Sergeant in the 
action of the 17th of June won for himself honorable 
notice from the commanding officer of the regiment. 

The Fifth went into the trenches in front of Peters- 
burg, where for three months it was occupied with the 
most arduous and dangerous duties of the siege, during 
which time its losses amounted to about one hundred 
and fifty officers and men. About the middle of Octo- 
ber the ranks of the regiment were again filled with a 
large number of substitutes, including many " bounty- 
jumpers," who took the earliest opportunity to desert to 
the enemy. Some of them bent their guns before leav- 
ing, which led to the belief that they were Canadian 
rebels. Some of them were afterward captured and 
made to suffer the penalty of death to expiate their 
crime. 

On the 12th of October, the three years' term of 
enlistment having expired, those men who had not 
re-enlisted, and such officers as desired, were mustered 
out of the service, and returned home to New Hamp- 
shire, under Col. Hapgood. Capt. Crafts was promoted 



292 TEE QBE AT REBELLION. 

to Lieut. Colonel, Capt. Livermore to Major, and Ass't 
Surgeon Ohilds to Surgeon. The regiment being 
reduced in number below the minimum, was organized 
into a battalion of eight companies and a fraction. 

In December the Second Corps moved to the extreme 
left of the line, and occupied Tort "Welch, which was 
at the salient angle of the left flank of the works in 
front of Petersburg. Here the regiment was drilled, 
clothed, equipped, recruits raised, a company of New 
Hampshire Sharpshooters consolidated with it, and again 
assumed its old position among the reliable regiments 
of the corps ; but through the seeming unjust opera- 
tion of the mustering regulations, the regimental or- 
ganization of ten companies could not be resumed. 

When, in the last days of March the Army of the 
Potomac commenced those operations which culminated 
in the surrender of the army of E"orthern Virginia, the 
Second Corps moved from its' intrenchments, crossing 
Hatcher's Run, and extending its lines five miles toward 
Dinwiddle Court House, Miles' Division, to which the 
Fifth belonged, forming the left of the line. For three 
days the enemy was continually encountered in the 
dense woods and thickets on the Run, and the Fifth, 
though always in the front line, fortunately sufiered but 
little. On the night after the battle of .Five Forks, 
Miles' Division moved out toward that field, and join- 
ing Gen. Sheridan, swept down the rebel works on the 
next day, where the grand assault had proved success- 
ful, and the rebels had begun their retreat; and pushing 
toward the Appomattox, in pursuit, it encountered 
three rebel divisions at "Wells' Church, where in hastily 
constructed works, they sought to arrest our advance 
until the remainder of their army on that field might 
cross the river. It was of the utmost importance that 
they should not accomplish their object, and the gallant 
General Miles, regardless of their auperiority of num- 



FIFTE REGIMENT. ?&3 

lierB, at once attacked th«ir position by assault. Twice 
be was repulsed with severe loss; but undauntedly 
moving on the third time, his gallant division poured 
over the works into twice its numbers, and captured 
five hundred prisoners, while the remainder fled toward 
the river. Half a battery was also captured, and some 
colors^ The enemy was vigorously pursued for three 
days, and on the morning of the 6th of April, when 
the whole army moved forward to attack him at Amelia 
Court House, where he was supposed to be resting, his 
rear was discovered in full retreat toward Lynchburg, 
by the Second Corps. Not a moment was lost in at- 
tacking him, and the retreat was soon changed into a 
rout. The course pursued by the enemy was a succes- 
sion of hills and valleys, which afforded eligible positions 
for resistance, which the enemy availed himself of at 
five different times during the day, when his rear guard, 
of five or six thousand men, forming its line on the 
crests, strove to retard our advance upon the trains, 
which could be seen flying over tha hills. The Second 
Corps formed in line of battle two miles in length, 
the whole front covered by skirmishers and with three 
brigades in reserve. The Fifth was in the front line 
during the whole day. The whole line moved forward 
together, and when it arrived in front of the position 
chosen by the rebels for defense, halting just long 
enough to discover the approaches, it invariably sent 
them flying after their retreating columns. The road 
for twelve miles was strewn with abandoned wagons 
and impediments of every kind, attesting to the terror 
of the fugitives. Just as the sun went down the ene- 
my's train was discovered at Sai-lor's Creek at a halt, 
with the bridge and ford blocked so that a passage was 
impossible. On either side of the creek there rose 
lolty hills. On the crest of one of them between our 
advance and the creek, the rebel rear guard made an 



294 THE GSEAT REBELLION. 

obstinate stand, but witb one grand charge the Second 
Corps swept it over the hill across the creek, and up 
the next, and triumphantly took possession of the train. 
Darkness closed on the wearied men, who in the twelve 
hours of light had marched thirteen miles, fought five 
times, and captured fifteen hundred prisoners, three 
cannon, eleven colors, and a train of near two hundred 
wagons. Some hundred thousand dollars of " Confed- 
erate" money was captured in the train, with which 
our soldiers perpetrated the pleasantry of paying off 
the prisoners in their hands. The Fifth lost twenty- 
three men killed and wounded during the day. 

The pursuit was resumed on the next morning. The 
Appomattox was crossed at High Bridge, a structure two 
thousand feet long and eighty feet high, which was set on 
fire at the west end, by the rebels, who, forming line of 
battle, endeavored to retard the advance of our troops 
until it should be materially injured ; but they were soon 
put to flight, and the bridge, which promised to be of 
the utmost importance in future operations, was saved 
by the exertions of Major Livermore, of the Fifth New 
Hampshire Eegiment, of Major General Humphrey's 
Staff. At a short distance from Farmville the rebels 
made a stand with their whole army against the Second 
Corps — ^the only infantry across the river — and the 
cavalry. They skirmished with the rebels all day, not 
having force enough to warrant a direct assault, expect- 
ing the arrival of re-enforcements. Near sundown 
all the companies of the Fifth but two, which remained 
on the skirmish line, with two other regiments, were 
selected to make a charge. The Fifth was commanded 
by Capt. Ricker, Lieut. Colonel Crafts being in com- 
mand of the skirmishers. The country between the 
enemy's works and the right flank of the corps, from 
which point the assault was to be made, was a suc- 
cession of abrupt hills and difficult ravines, presenting 



FIFTB REQIMENT. 295 

great obstacles to a rapid movement. The regiment 
moved forward, and almost immediately the enemy 
opened with both a direct and cross fire, and one of the 
most bloody battles in which the Fifth had been engaged 
during the war, ensued. Close io the works the colors 
of the regiment were taken by the enemy. Lieut. 
Ryder, a gallant officer, was killed, and Capt. Collins, a 
brave man, was mortally wounded. Both of these had 
joined the regiment from the Engineers Corps. Capt. 
Ricker, in the most persistent efforts to carry his line 
forward, fell with three wounds — one of which he had 
borne all day — after having two horses shot under him, 
and was taken prisoner close to the works. The loss of 
the Fifth on this day was six officers and one hundred 
and four men killed and wounded, and four officers and 
sixty-three men taken prisoners. The next day the regi- 
ment moved again in the pursuit, when Capt. Ricker 
was recaptured. On the 9th, the shattered remnant 
of the Fifth having followed to the surrender, received 
back its colors, which it had fairly won from the rebels, 
together with the release of the captured officers and 
men. 

After the surrender of the rebel army, the Fifth 
marched through Richmond to the vicinity of Washing- 
ton, and in May marched in grand review before the 
President. On the last of June it started for Concord, 
and was mustered out of service on the 8th of July, 
1865. 

During the three years and nine months that this regi- 
ment was in the service, it had borne upon its rolls 
the names of about twenty-six hundred men. It lost 
from the casualties of war about fifteen hundred, about 
thirteen hundred of which were in actions. Sixteen of 
its officers were killed or mortally wounded in battle. 

The foregoing sketch of the Fifth Regiment has been 
taken mostly from the Adjutant General's reports, and 



296 THE QBE AT REBELLION. 

serves to give but a faint and imperfect id«a of its val-' 
uable services during the war ; its desperate and bloody 
battles, tban wbich none from this State can show a 
longer list; its hardships in the trenches opposite Peters- 
burg and on working details ; its fatiguing marches and 
privations incident to war, all of which the men endured 
with uncomplaining patience and bravery. Were a full 
history of its operations attempted, a much larger vol- 
ume than the one in hand would be required to contain 
it. Instances of individual gallantry on the part of 
officers and men in that regiment are so numerous that 
a list of them would be too great for present limits ; 
and a roll of its killed in battle would appear almost 
incredible. May a grateful country do the Fifth New 
Hampshire Regiment of Volunteers justice — ^written 
history never can. 



8IXTS REGIMENT. 297 

SIXTH REGIMENT. 



This Regiment was recruited mainly in the western 
part of the State, under the same call and with the 
same bounty as was paid to the three preceding ones. 
It rendezvoused at Keene, and was mustered into the 
United States service on the 27th, 28th and 30th of 
November, 1861, and left the State for the seat of war 
on the 25th of December, with ten hundred and twenty- 
four officers and men. The following were its field, 
staff and company officers while in service, with the 
official record of each : 

FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS. 

Colonels — ^Nelson Converse, of Marlborough. 

Besigned Maxch 8, 1862. 
Simon G. Griffin, of Concord. 

Promoted to Brigadier General U. S. Vols. May 12, 1864. 

Phin p. Bixby, of Concord. 

Appointed Colonel II. S. Vols, by brevet, for gallant and highly meritorious 
conduct in the assault before Petersburg, Va., to date ft'om April 2, 1865. 
Mustered out July 17, 1865. 

Lieut. Colonels — ^Kelson Converse, of Marlborough. 

Promoted to Colonel Oct. 26, 1861. 

Simon G. Griffin, of Concord. 

Promoted to Colonel April 22, 1862. 

Charles Scott, of Peterborough. 

Resigned Oct. 4, 1862. 

Henry H. Pearson, of Exeter. 

Killed in action May 26, 1864. 

Phin P. Bixby, of Concord. 

Promoted to Colonel Feb. 21, 1865. 

Samuel D. Quarles, of Ossipee. 

Appointed Lieut. Colonel U. S. Vols, by brevet, for gallant and meritorious 
conduct before Petersburg, Va., to date from April 2, 1865. Mustered out 
July 17, 1865. 

Majors — Charles Scott, of Peterborough. 

Promoted to Lieut. Colonel April 22, 1862. 



298 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

Obed G. Dort, of Keene. 

Besigned Oct. 16, 1862. 

Phin P. Bixby, of Concord. 

Wounded July 15, 1864. Promoted to Lient. Colonel July 28, 1864. 

Samuel D. Quarles, of Ossipee. 

Promoted to Lieut. Colonel June 1, 1865. 

Robert L. Ela, of Concord. 

Mustered out July 17, 1865. 

Adjutants — ^Don H. Woodward, of Keene. 

Besigned Nov. 28, 1861. 

Phin p. Bixby, of Concord. " 

Promoted to Major Oct. 15, 1862. 

John S. Smith, of Peterborough. 

Wounded July 30, 1864. Mastered out March 2, 1865. 

Quartermasters — ^AlOnzo Nute, of Farmington. 

Besigned March 19, 1863. 

Eli "Wentworth, of Milton. 

Died July 18, 1863. 

Gilmore McL. Houston, of Plymouth. 

Mustered out July 17, 1865. 

Surgeons — ^William A. Tracy, of Nashua. 

Besigned March 15, 1863. 

Sherman Cooper, of Claremont. 

Mustered out November 28, 1864. 
James H. Noyes, of E"ashua. 

Mustered out July 17, 1865. 

Ass't Surgeons — Sherman Cooper, of Claremont. 

Promoted to Surgeon March 20, 1863. 

James H, Noyes, of Ifashua. 

Promoted to Surgeon Jan. 2, 1865. 

James P. "Walker, of Manchester. 

Besigned Feb. 8, 1864. 
Elihu P. Pierce, of "Winchester. 

Mustered out July 17, 1865. 

Chaplains — ^Robert Stinson, 9f Croydon. 

Besigned July 15, 1862. 
John A. Hamilton, of Keene. 

Resigned July 1, 1863. 
John S. Dore, of "Waterville, Me. 

Mustered out July 17, 1865. 

Sergeant Majors — Timothy K. Ames, of Peterborough. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. April 28, 1862. 

Charles F. "Winch, of Peterborough. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. Aug. 5, 1862. 



SIXTH BEQIMENT. 299 

John M. Dodd, of Peterborough. 
Be-enlisted Jan. 1, 1864. Promoted to Second Lieut. Jan. 1, 1864. 

Abraham Cohn, of 'Eew York City. 
Wounded July 80, 1864 Promoted to First Lieut. March 1, 1865. 

Quartermaster Sergeants — ^A. M. Kimball, of Rochester. 

Not officially accounted for. 

Gilmore McL. Houston, of Plymouth. 

Promoted to Quartermaster Aug. 1, 186S. 
Omar W. Gate, of Holderness. 

Be-enlisted Jan. 4, 1864. Promoted to First Lieut. June 1, 1866. 

Elijah T. Platts, of Fitzwilliam. 

Mustered out July 17, 1866. 

Commissary Sergeants — John H. Varney, of Milton. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. Feb. 1, 1863. 

Samuel R. Dickerman, of Nashua. 

Ke-enlisted Jan. 1, 1864. Reduced to ranks July 1, 1864. 

John A. Platts, of Fitzwilliam. 

Promoted to First Lieut. June 1, 1866. 

"William Delano, of Newport. 

Mustered out July 17, 1865. 

Hospital Stewards — James H. Noyes, of Nashua. 

Promoted to Ass't Surgeon May 18, 1862. 

Levi P. Dodge, of New London. 

Discharged for disability Feb. 1868. 

Marshall L. Brown, of Keene. 

Re-enlisted Dec. 29, 1863. Promoted to Ass't Surgeon June 1, 1865. 

Charles Gelberg, of Stark. 

Mustered out July 17, 1865. 

Principal Musicians — Shubael "White, of Keene. 

Discharged for disability March 8, 1862. 

John Currier. 

Not officially accounted for. 

Wallace Scott, af Peterborough. 

Mustered out Dec. 13, 1864. 

John G. Mason, of Tamworth. 

Mustered out July 17, 1865. 

COMPANY OFFICERS. 

Co. A. — Captains — Joseph Clark, of Plymouth, 

Resigned April 14, 1862. 

Oliver H. P. Craige, of Holderness. 

Resigned Oct 21, 1862. 



300 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

Thomas H. Dearborn of Seabrook. 

Mustered out Nov. 27, 1864. 

John S. Eowell, of Brentwood. 

Mustered out July 17, 1866. 

First Lients. — Oliver H. P. Craige, of Holderness. 

Promoted to Captain April 15, 1862. 

Thomas P. Cheeney, of Holderness. 

Bfisigned Nov. 25, 1862. 

Thomas H. Dearborn, of Seabrook. 

Promoted to Captain Dec. 24, 1863. 

John S. Eowell, of Brentwood. 

Wounded Sept. 30, 1864. Promoted to Captain Jan. 7, 1865. 

Omar "W. Gate, of Holderness. 

Mustered out July 17, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — Thos. P. Cheeney, of Holderness. 

Promoted to First Lieut. April 15, 1862. 

Alfred L. Smith, of Plymouth. 

Resigned Dec. 22, 1868. 
Frederick P. Hardy, of Groton. 

Promoted to Captain Jan. 8, 1865. 
Alvah Heald, of Temple. 

Mustered out July 17, 1865. 

Co. B. — Captains — Sam. P. Adams, of Haverhill. 

Resigned July 30, 1862. 
Samuel G. Goodwin, of Littleton. 

Wounded July 8, 1864. Appointed Major 0. S. Vols, by brevet, for gallant 
and meritorious services before Petersburg, Va., to date from April 2, 1865. 
Mustered out as Captain July 17, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Andrew J. Eoberts, of Enfield. 

Resigned May 10, 1862. 
Samuel G. Goodwin, of Littleton. 

Promoted to Captain July 31, 1862. 

Lyman Jackman, of "Woodstock. 

Promoted to Captain Aug. 1, 1864. 

Thomas J. Carlton, of Enfield. 

Wounded Sept. 80, 1864. Promoted to Captain Jan. 10, 1865. 

Frank Pierce, of Troy. 

Mustered out July 17, 1865. 

Second Lieuts.— Samuel G. Goodwin, of Littleton. 

Promoted to First Lieut. May 16, 1862. 

Lyman Jackman, of Woodstock. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Jan. 1, 1868. 

James M. Dodd, of Peterborough. 

Died of disease May 14, 1864. 



SIXTH REGIMENT. 301 

Co. C. — Captains — Henry H. Pearson, of Exeter. 

Promoted to Lieut. Colonel Oct 16, 1862. 

"William K. Crossfield, of Keene. 

Killed near Petersburg, July 30, 1864. 

Lyman Jackman, of "Woodstock. 

Taken Prisoner at Poplar Grove Church Sept. 30, 1864. Beleased Feb. 24, 
1865. Mustered out July 17, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — ^David A. Titcomb, of Seabrook. 

Promoted to Captain April 18, 1862. 

James P. Brooks, of Newmarket. 

Resigned Got. 31, 1862. 

John H. Varney, of Milton. 

Mustered out Jan. 5, 1865. 

Abraham Cohn, of New York City. 

Mustered out July 17, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — James P. Brooks, of Newmarket. 

Promoted to First Lieut. April 29, 1862. 

Matthew N. Greenleaf, of Exeter. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Sept. 12, 1862. 

Thomas H. Dearborn, of Seabrook. 

Promoted to First Lieut. July 1, 1863. 

Henry J. Griffin, of Concord. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Sept. 1, 1864. 

Henry E. Badger, of Peterborough. 

Mustered out July 17, 1865. 

Co. D. — Captains — Samuel D. Quarles, of Ossipee. 

Wounded May 18, 1864. Promoted to Major July 28, 1864. 

John "W. Hanscom, of Farmington. 

Mustered out July 17, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Josiah N. Jones, of "Wakefield. 

Promoted to Captain Aug. 4, 1862. 

Albert "W. Hayes, of Farmington. 

Promoted to Captain Oct. 24, 1862. 

Orange B. Otis, of Rochester. 

Wounded July 8, 1864. Honorably discharged Nov. 28, 1864. 

Charles "W. Thurston, of Stoddard. 

Mustered out July 17, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — ^Albert "W. Hayes, of Farmington. 
Promoted to First Lieut Aug. 4, 1862. 

Josiah Prescott, of Sandwich. 

KiUed at BuU Run, Aug. 29, 1862. 

Robert T. Brown, of Tamworth. 

Dismissed Kov. 18, 1863. 



302 THE OMEAT REBELLION. 

John W. Hanscom, of Farmington. 
Wouncled July 80, 1864. Promoted to Captain Jan. 9, 1865. 

Co. E. — Captains — Obed G. Dort, of Keene. 

Promoted to Major April 22, 1862. 

Jolin A. Cummings, of Peterborougli. 

Discharged to accept promotion, April 6, 1864. 

Edward F. Adams, of Marlborough. 

Mustered out Jan. 6, 1865. 

"William H. Keaj, of Dover. 

Mustered out July 17, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — J. H. Cummings, of Peterborough. 

Promoted to Captain April 23, 1862. 

Ceorge H. Muchmore, of Keeue. 

Died Sept. 11, 1862. 

Matthew N". Greenleaf, of Eieter. 

Promoted to Captain July 1, 1868. 

Edward F. Adams, of Marlborough. 

Promoted to Captain April 20, 1864. 

John Curtin, of Keene. 

Wounded May 6, 1864. Wounded June 3, 1864. Discharged on account 
of wounds Aug. 19, 1864. 

Sidney B. Higgins, of Chesterfield. 

Mustered out July 17, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — George H. Muchmore, of Keene. 

Promoted to First Lieut. April 23, 1862. 

William K. Crossfield, of Keene. 

Promoted to Captain Oct 16, 1862. 

John S. Smith, of Peterborough. 

Promoted to Adjutant March 20, 1868. 

John Curtin, of Keene. 

Promoted to First Lieut. April 20, 1864. 
Frank L. Gray, of Hancock. 

Wounded May 12, 1864. Not mustered. Discharged for disability as First 
Sergeant, Dec. 26, 1864. 

James O. Smith, of Holdeness. 

Mustered out July 17, 1865. 

Co. F. — Captains — George C. Starkweather, of Keene. 

Resigned Jan. 29, 1862. 

Amos D. Combs, of Swanzey. 

Resigned Aug. 2, 1862. 

Josiah N. Jones, of "Wakefield. 

Mustered out Kov. 28, 1864. 

Thomas J. Carlton, of Enfield. 

&onorably discharged June 13, 1865. 



SIXTH REGIMENT. 303 

John H. Pinkham, of Dover. 

Mustered out July 17, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Amos D. Combs, of Swanzey. 

Promoted to Captain April 2'J, 1862. 

John L. Adams, of Alstead. 

Honorably discharged March 14, 1863. 

George E. Upton. 

Killed at Petersburg July 30, 1864. 

Charles L. Clarke, of Wolfeborough. 

Mustered out July 17, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — John L. Adams, of Alstead. 

Promoted to First Lieut. April 29, 1862. 

Isaac A. Dustin, of Derry. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Feb. 1, 1863. 

Cyrus G. McClure, of Keene. 
Wounded May 18, 1864. Honorably discharged Not. 28, 1864. 

Charles C. Chesley, of Concord. 

Mustered out July 17, 1865. 

Co. G. — Captains — John "W. Putnam, of Croydon. 

Besigned Oct. 27, 1862. 

Albert W. Hayes, of Farmington. 

Honorably discharged Sept. 30, 1868. 

Isaac A, Dustin, of Derry. 

Honorably discharged May 17, 1864. 

Adams K. Tilton, of Canterbury. 

KiUed near Pegram House, Va., Sept. 30, 1864. 

Henry J. Griffin of Concord. 

Mustered out July 17, 1864. 

First Lieuts. — ^E. Darwin Comings, of Croydon. 

Promoted to Captain Aug. 2, 1862. 

Timothy K. Ames, of Peterborough. 

Killed at BuU Run, Aug. 22, 1862. 

Isaiah A. Dustin, of Derry. 

Promoted to Captain Not. 1, 1863. 

Adams K. Tilton, of Canterbury. 

Promoted to Captain July 2, 1864. 

Henry J. Griffin, of Concord. 

Promoted to Captain Jan. 11, 1865. 

Eussell Tyler, of Cornish. 

Wounded April 2, 1865. Mustered out July 17, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — C. Y. Gardner, of Sunapee. 

Resigned M«iy 15, 1862. 

Edward M. Emerson. 

Resigned Dec. 3, 1862. 



304 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

John A. Gtorge, of Newport. 

Honorably dischiurged Aug. 26, 1864. 

Sebastian L. Getchell, of "Wentworth. 

^ Honorably discharged Aug. 26, 1864. 

Moses P. Bemis, of Littleton. 

Mustered out July 17 1865. 

Co. H. — Captains — John B. Sanders, of Durham. 

Resigned Aug. 2, 1862. 

E. Darwin Comings, of Croydon. 

Resigned Oct. 81, 1862. 

Matthew iN". Greenleaf, of Exeter. 

Wounded June 30, 1864. Honorably discharged for disability Nov. 28, 
1864. Restored to rank March 1, 1865. Mustered out July 17, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Andrew J. Sides, of Portsmouth. 

Resigned July 3, 1862. 

Eli Wentworth, of Milton. 

Appointed Quartermaster March 19, 1868. 

Theodore Hanseom, of Jaffrey. 

Promoted to Captain Nov. 2, 1863. 

"William H. Keay, of Dover. 

Wounded July 26, 1864. Promoted to Captain Jan 7, 1865. 

John H. Pinkham, of Dover. 

Promoted to Captain June 1, 1866. 

Second Lieuts. — ^Eli Wentworth, of Milt'on. 

Promoted to First Lieut. July 4. 1862. 

Hosea C. Clay, of Rochester. 

Lied of disease Nov. 3, 1862. 
Theodore Hanseom, of Jaffrey. 

Promoted to First Lieut. July 2, 1863. 
Thomas J. Carlton, of Enfield. 
Wounded June 3, 1864. Promoted to First Lieut. Aug. 1, 1864. 

Co. L — Captains — ^Robert L. Ela, of Concord. 

Wounded severely Aug. 29, 1862. Wounded July 30, 1864. Re-mustered 
Captain second term three years. Promoted to Major June 1, 1865. 

Robert H. Potter, of Concord. 

Mustered out July 17, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Thomas T. Moore, of Concord. 

Killed at Bull Run Aug. 29, 1862. 

Charles J. Brown of Epsom. 

Honorably discharged Nov. 4, 1864. 

Robert H. Potter, of Concord. 

Promoted to Captain June 1, 1865. 



8IXTH REGIMENT. 305 

Second Lieuts. — ^Hubbard T. Dudley, of Concord. 

Besigned June 30, 1862. 
Charles J. Brown, of Epsom. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Sept. 1, 1862. 

Adam K. Tilton, of Canterbury. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Nov. 1, 1863. 

Joseph M. Shephard, of Gilmanton. , 
Killed in action June 9. 1864. 

Prescott Hall, of Canterbury. 

Honorably discharged Dec. 5, 1864. 

Henry K. Whi taker, of Goshen. 

Mustered out July 17, 1865. 

Co. K. Captains — ^Ebenezer H. Converse, of Rindge. 

Resigned April 24, 1862. 

David A. Titcomb, of Seabrook. 

Resigned Dec. 22, 1862. 

Theodore Hanscom, of Jaffrey. 

Discharged Nov. 26, 1864. 

Frederick P. Hardy, of Groton. 

Mustered out July 17, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Jonas Nutting, of ISew Ipswich. 

Resigned April 24, 1862. 

Charles L. Fuller, of Peterborough. 

Wounded Aug. 29, 1862. Died of wounds Sept. 2, 1862. 

Charles F. Winch, of Peterborough. 

Honorably discharged April 20, 1864. 

John A. Platts, of Fitzwilliam. 

Mustered out July 17, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — Chas. L. Fuller, of Peterborough. 

Promoted to First Lieut. April 28, 1862. 

Timothy X. Ames, of Peterborough. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Ang. 5, 1862. 

Charles F. Winch, of Peterborough. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Sept. 20, 1862. 

Charles H. Hull, of ITew Ipswich. 

Resigned Jan. 13, 1863. 

John H. Varney, of Milton. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Feb. 1, 1864 

George W. Osgood, of Nelson. 

Promoted to First Lieut. July 3, 1864. 

Addison G. Harmon, of Madison. 

Mustered out July 17, 1865. 



306 THE QBE AT REBELLION. 

COLONEL NELSON CONVERSE. 

Colonel Nelson Converse resides at Marlborough 
in Cheshire County. He has held several commissions 
in the State militia, running through a long term of 
years. In 1860, when a reorganization of the militia 
was made throughout the State, Colonel Converse was 
appointed Major General of the Third Division. In 
October, 1861, it was determined to raise the Sixth 
Regiment, and that it should rendezvous at Keene. 
Captain Mack, of the regular army, a native of Cheshire 
County, was appointed Colonel, and Nelson Converse, 
Lieut. Colonel, and was to take the general charge of 
raising the regiment and making it ready for the field. 
He was very active and efficient in the performance of 
this trust, and his extensive aquaintance enabled him 
to enlist the requisite number of men in a very short 
time. It was finally found that Captain Mack would 
not be relieved from the position he held in the regular 
army by the War Department, and Lieut. Colonel Con- 
verse was promoted to Colonel on the 26th of October. 
He went to the seat of war with his regiment, and 
commanded it until the 8th of March,, 1862, when, in con- 
sequence of ill health, he resigned. While he command- 
ed the regiment its duties were mostly in camp, at 
Hatteras Inlet, North Carolina. It was not called into 
action at all until after Colonel Converse had resigned. 

GBNEKAL SIMON G. GRIFFIN. 

General Griffin was born at Nelson, Cheshire Counly, 
New Hampshire, on the 9th of August, 1824. He re- 
ceived a thorough academical education, and for several 
years was engaged in teaching. While thus engaged 
he represented his native town two years in the popular 
branch of the New Hampshire legislature. He com- 




Bag\yQ,^E.Feaac'^ 





v-^C^^^^'^/z^^.^y^^ ^^^ 




SIXTH REQIMENT. 807 

menced the study of law with Alvah "Wood, of Exeter, 
continued with Messrs. Flint & Bryant, of Concord, was 
admitted to the bar in Merrimack County in the autumn 
of 1860, and immediately commenced practice at Con- 
cord. When news came of the assault on Fort Sumter, 
Gen. Griffin at once turned his attention to military 
affairs and commenced the study of military tactics. 
He and a number of other young men formed a com- 
pany, and at its organization he was chosen its Captain 
and commissioned by Governor Goodwin. This com- 
pany, assisted by citizens of Concord, procured Sharpe's 
breech-loading rifles, and afterward became the famous 
Company B, of the Second Eegiment, New Hampshire 
Volunteers, noted for its efficiency as skirmishers and 
sharpshooters. He commanded the Company during 
the first battle of Bull Run, on the 21st of July, 1861. 

In October, 1861, Capt. Griffin was promoted to 
Lieutenant Colonel, and transferred to the Sixth New 
Hampshire Regiment, which was then being enlisted. 
In March, 1862, Colonel Converse resigned, and the 
command of the regiment devolved upon Lieut. Col. 
Griffin. On the 7th of April he commanded an expedi- 
tion composed of six hundred men, assisted by five gun 
boats from the Navy, to Elizabeth City, North Carolina, 
which resulted in the capture of seventy-four prisoners, 
three hundred and fifty stand of arms, ammunition and 
other property, the killing of one rebel and the wound- 
ing of two others in the attack, and the breaking up of 
a rebel rendezvous at that place. He also commanded 
the regiment at the battle of Camden, N. C, on the 
19th of April, where by its conduct it won a good repu- 
tation as a fighting regiment, and was permitted, iu 
general orders, to inscribe " Camden, April 19, 1862," 
upon its colors. On the 22d of April Lieut. Colonel 
Griffin was commissioned Colonel of the Sixth Regi- 
ment. He commanded the regiment at the second battle 



308 TBE GREAT REBELLION. 

of Bull Eun, on the 29tli of August, 1862, and in the 
battle of Chantilly, on the 1st of September, on both of 
which occasions the regiment acted with great bravery. 
At the battle of Antietam, on the 17th of September, 
Col. Griffin, with his regiment and the Second Mary- 
land, charged the stone bridge across Antietam creek, 
and although checked at first by the murderous fire of 
the enemy, succeeded in carrying the bridge, and the 
Sixth, with Col. Griffin at its head, was the first to form 
its line on the height beyond. He commanded his regi- 
ment at the battle of Fredericksburg, on the 13th of 
December, where it lost seventy-five men killed and 
wounded, being about one-third of its entire strength. 
On the 20th of May, 1863, Col. Griffin was assigned 
permanently to the command of the First Brigade, 
Second Division, Ninth Army Corps. Early in June 
the brigade went, under command of Col. Griffin, to 
the assistance of Gen. Grant in his operations against 
Vicksburg, and participated in its capture. He was 
also with his command in the campaign of Gen. Sher- 
man against Gen. Joe Johnston, and the capture of the 
city of Jackson, Miss., in July, where he was in charge 
of the Ninth Corps, having three brigades under his 
command. In August the Corps returned to Kentucky, 
and a part of it immediately proceeded across the Cum- 
berland Mountains to join Gen. Bumside in his cam- 
paign in East Tennessee, Col. Griffin being in command 
of the Second Division of the Ninth Army Corps. In 
October, Col. Griffin was sent by Gen. Bumside to bring 
forward the remainder of the Ninth Corps, which had 
been left in Kentucky, but was finally assigned to the 
command of Camp Nelson, at that time a large and 
important post, as 'the rendezvous of the Tennessee 
refugees, to the number of about nine thousand, who 
were there formed into regiments. 

In the spring of 1864 the Ninth Corps was re-organ- 



8IXTS REGIMENT. 309 

zed at Annapolis, Md., and Col. Griffin was assigned 
to the command of the Second Brigade, Second Di- 
vision, composed of the Sixth, Mnth and Eleventh Ifew 
Hampshire, the Thirty-first and Thirty-second Maine, 
and the Seventeenth Vermont regiments. He com- 
manded his brigade in the battle of the Wilderness, 
May 6th, 1864, and also in the battle of Spottsylvania 
Court House, on the 12th, in the latter of which it saved 
Gen. Hancock's Corps from being routed. It was in 
this battle that Col. Griffin acted with such consummate 
skill and gallantry as to win a Brigadier General's 
commission, on the recommendation of Gen. Grant. 
He was in command of his brigade at the battles of 
I^orth Anna River, May 20th and 21st, Ptolopotamy 
Creek, May 31st, Bethesda Church, June 2d, and Cold 
Harbor, June 3d. 

On the night of the 16th of June General Griffin, 
in command of his own and Gen. Curtin's brigade, 
made an adroit and successful, attack on the enemy's 
intrenched lines in front of Petersburg, carrying their 
works for a mile in extent, capturing nearly one 
thousand prisoners, besides four pieces of artillery, 
caissons and horses, more than a thousand stand of 
small arms and a quantity of ammunition. Gen. Pot^ 
ter, commanding the division, entrusted the whole 
planning and execution of this attack to Gen. Griffin, 
and most skilfully did he carry out his part of it. He 
had made a wide breach in the enemy's lines, and there 
was nothing to prevent an advance into the city, had 
supports come up in time. But the other corps were 
not ready to advance, and when, at three o'clock in the 
afternoon, the First and Third Divisions attacked, the 
enemy was prepared to meet them, and they were 
repulsed with immense slaughter. Gen. Griffin com- 
manded his brigade in the assault on the "Mine," 
July 30th, at the battle of the "Weldon Railroad, on 



310 THE aSEAT REBELLION. 

the 20th of August, the hattle of Poplar Spring Church, 
on the 30th of September, and at the battle of Hatcher's 
Eun, on the 27th of October. 

On the Second of April, 1865, Gen. Griffin arranged 
and led the assault on the enemy's lines at " Fort HeU," 
on the part of the Second Division, Ninth Army Corps, 
which gave us Petersburg and Richmond. At the 
commencement of the action Gen. Potter, commanding 
the Division, was severely wounded, and was succeeded 
by Gen. Griffin, who exhibited throughout the greatest 
activity, bravery and skill. For " gallant conduct " in 
this battle he was breveted a Major General of U. S. 
Volunteers — a brevet that was worth something, for 
it was won sword in hand, on one of the most bloody 
fields of the entire war. He retained command of the 
Division and joined with the Corps in the pursuit and 
capture of Gen. Lee's army. He returned with the 
Division to Alexandria, and was mustered out of the 
United States servicef in_Septenil)arM865. His service 
was constantly at the ff&nt, and never, during the whole 
war, did the troops of his command make a march or 
come under fire in a single instance that he was not 
present to command them in person. 

After returning home. Gen. Griffin was offered by 
the government a position as field officer in one of the 
old regiments, and his appointment was made out and 
sent to him; but after so thorough an experience of 
the hardships and privations of the field, and after 
the war was over and there being no real call of his 
country for his services, he preferred the quiet and 
enjoyment of home, and declined the offer. Subsequent- 
ly Gen. Griffin settled in Keene, and in 1866 was elected 
in that town to a seat in the popular branch of the^ 
Legislature, was re-enlisted in 1867 and 1868, and 
served both of the last two years as Speaker of the 
House. Few men who entered the army from any 



SIXTH REGIMENT. 311 

State can show a more honorable record in the field 
than that made by Major General Simon G. Griffin. 

COLONEL PHIN P. BIXBY. 

Colonel Bixby is a native of New Hampshire. When 
the war broke out, in 1861, he was engaged in trade at 
Concord, as a member of the firm of "Webster & Bixby, 
doing a thriving business. But he felt that his country 
had claims upon him and needed his services, and de- 
termined to abandon his peaceful pursuits and enlist for 
the war in some capacity. He tendered his services to 
the Governor, and on the 30th of November, 1861, was 
commissioned Adjutant of the Sixth Regiment, New 
Hampshire Volunteers. He performed the duties of 
this position to general acceptance. He was in the 
second battle of Bull Run, on the 29th of August, 
1862, was wounded, taken prisoner and carried to Libby 
Prison, Richmond, where he was kept five or six weeks, 
and then exchanged, re-joined his regiment about the 
middle of October, on the 15th of which month. Major 
Dort having resigned, he was commissioned Major 
in his place. Major Bixby was again wounded on the 
16th of July, 1864, in front of Petersburg, in conse- 
quence of which he was absent from his regiment about 
three months, during which time, on the 28th of July, 
1864, he was promoted to Lieut. Colonel, in place of 
Lieut. Colonel Pearson, killed at North Anna River. He 
was most of the time in command of his regiment, until 
the last battle of Petersburg, when he was in command 
of a brigade. Gen. Potter was wounded, Gen. Griffin 
took command of the Division and Col. Bixby succeeded 
to the command of the brigade, which position he held 
until after the surrender of Lee. After the promotion 
of Col. Griffin, Lieut. Colonel Bixby was promoted to 
Colonel, on the 21st of February, 1865. He was also 



312 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

appointed Colonel of United States Volunteers, by 
brevet, " for gallant and highly meritorious conduct in 
the assault before Petersburg, Va., to date from April 2, 
1865." He continued with and commanded his rai- 
ment until the 17th of July, 1865, when he was mustered 
out with it. He was with his regiment in all its hard 
marches and battles from the date of his first commission 
until the close of the war, except during the three 
months that he was laid up with wounds received in 
front of Petersburg. After the close of the war Col. 
Bixby returned home, and is now in business at Con- 
cord, with his old partner, Mr. Webster. He was a 
brave soldier, and always at his post ready for duty, 

LIEUT. COLONEL HENBY H. PEARSON. 

Lieut. Colonel Pearson was bom at E'ewport, HI., on 
the 26th of F-ebruary, 1840. In 1854 he removed with 
his family to Bloomington, and soon after determined, 
if possible, to obtain a liberal education. His father 
being in moderate circumstances, young Pearson went 
resolutely to work in a lumber yard at Lincoln, on the 
St. Louis Railroad, in order to obtain means to meet the 
expenses of a preparatory college course. He had a 
great passion for study and books of almost all kinds, 
and more especially biographies and history. In 1860 
he came to Exeter and entered Phillips Academy, 
where he was soon distinguished as a close, faithful. 
and able scholar. His dignified deportment, unifo'rm 
good nature and forbearance gained for him the good 
will and respect of his instructors and associates. All 
who knew him saw that he had a purpose; that his 
mind was filled with noble aspirations, and that he 
promised to signalize himself in whatever pursuit in life 
he might adopt. 

On the breaking out of the rebellion, in April, 1861, 



SIXTH REGIMENT. 313 

young Pearson was fired with, true military ardor and 
patriotism, and determined to enlist and fight the battles 
of his country against treason and rebellion. He at 
once left the academy and started for the seat of war, 
and walked all the way from Baltimore to "Washington, 
where he at once joined a miliary company, with which 
he served until after the first disastrous battle of Bull 
Run. He then returned to Exeter, and in the autumn 
of 1861 was commissioned Captain by Gov. Berry, and 
set himself vigorously at work to raise a company, at 
the same time reading the best histories he could obtain 
of the military campaigns of I^apoleon, and making 
plans of his great battles. He was most dehghted with 
the movements on the field of "Waterloo, and drew 
diagrams of them. The war reports of McClellan, 
Mordecai and Delafield were read by him with great 
interest, and digested and remembered. In order to 
raise his company he appointed war meetings in towns 
in the neighborhood of Exeter, and addressed the peo- 
ple with modesty, simplicity and marked effect. On 
the 22d of November he left Exeter, with nearly a full 
company, for Keene, and joined the Sixth Regiment, 
then being organized there. His company was as- 
signed its proper place in the line, and lettered C. 
Soon after, and before leaving the State with his regi- 
ment, the people of Exeter presented Captain Pearson 
with a handsome sword and other substantial testimo- 
nials of their regard and esteem. 

In April, 1862, he led his company against the enemy 
at Camden, IS". C, and also at Bull Run, on the 29th 
of August, on both of which occasions he behaved with 
great coolness and bravery, and commanded his com- 
pany with consummate tact and skill. He afterward 
wrote interesting sketches of these two battles and 
made diagrams to accompany them, aU of which were 
published. These papers disclosed keen discrimination 



314 THE QBE AT REBELLION. 

and a remarkable knowledge of the principal military 
movements in those battles. At Cbantilly, South 
Mountain and Fredericksburg the Sixth was in the 
thickest of the contest, and afterward in June and July, 
1863, at Vicksburg, and Jackson, Mississippi, took a 
prominent part, on all of which occasions Capt. Pearson 
distinguishfed himself for coolness and gallantry. When 
in December, 1863, the men of the Sixth Regiment 
re-enlisted for. a second term, Capt. Pearson, for meri- 
torious conduct, was promoted to Lieut. Colonel of his 
regiment. He went into the great campaign of 1864 
with confidence and zeal. In the battle of the Wilder- 
ness he led his men with discretion and bravery. On 
the 26th of May, at North Anna E,iver, about twelve 
miles from Richmond, while reconnoitering the move- 
ments and position of the enemy with a field glass, he 
was shot by a sharpshooter, the ball entering his fore- 
head. He never spoke afterward and died in a few 
hours. 

Lieut. Colonel Pearson was a man of fine natural 
ability, good education, of commanding figure and man- 
ner; kind and attentive to the wants of his men; 
always ready tp share with them his blanket and last 
crust, which with his coolness and bravery, gained for 
him the love and respect of all. He controlled his men 
by his force of character rather than by any established 
rules of discipline. He was in every battle where his 
regiment was engaged up to the time of his death. By 
his superior officers and all others he was admitted to 
be the ablest and most accomplished officer of his rank 
in the Ninth Army Corps, and there was no one of any 
rank who enjoyed more universal respect and esteem, or 
whose death would have been more sincerely lamented, 
not only on account of his value as an officer but Ms 
worth as a man and friend. 



SIXTH REGIMENT. 315 

Soon after the arrival of the Sixth Regiment at 
Washington it was assigned to Gen. Burnside's Division 
and proceeded to Hatteras Inlet, S"orth Carolina, arriv- 
ing there on the 13th of January, 1862, amidst a most 
terrific storm. The storm continued eight days, during 
which it was impossible to land the troops or proceed 
to any other destination. The Sixth finally disembarked 
at Hatteras Inlet, and went into camp of instruction, 
with the Eleventh Connecticut, Eighty-ninth New York, 
Forty-eighth Pennsylvania, and Ninth New York — 
Hawkins' Zouaves — reporting to Brigadier General 
"Williams, commanding post and brigade. Herfe the 
regiment was attacked with a malignant fever, which 
with measles, that assumed a virulent type, in con- 
sequence of the removal of the regiment while the 
disease was in progress, carried off sixty men in as 
many days. The regiment embarked to Eoanoke Island, 
where it arrived on the 2d of March, and went into 
camp as a part of the garrison of that post, under 
Colonel Rush C. Hawkins, as brigade and post com- 
m.ander. On the 8th Colonel Converse resigned his 
commission, and Lieut. Colonel Griffin assumed com- 
msind of the regiment, 

6n the 7th of April four companies of the Sixth, 
with two companies of the Ninth New York Regiment, 
in all about six hundred men, under command of Lieut. 
Colonel Griffin, were sent to break up an encampment 
of rebels at Elizabeth City, N. C, and if possible cap- 
ture the recruits. The expedition consisted of five 
gunboats and a steamer to convey the troops. The 
expedition left Roanoke Island at night, and was to 
make the attack at daylight the next morning. In the 
attack one rebel was killed, two wounded and seventy-' 
four made prisoners, the remainder taking to the woods 
upon the first appearance of the Union forces. Three 



316 THE OBEAT REBELLION. 

hundred and fifty stand of arms, and a quantity of 
aihmunition and public property, were taken, and the 
rendezvous broken up. 

On the 19th of April, the Sixth with its brigade was 
in the battle of Camden, K C. At a critical' moment, 
after other regiments in the brigade had been repulsed 
by the enemy, the Sixth was ordered to advance and 
drive the rebels from the woods, which they occupied 
beyond an open field. The regiment moved forward in 
gallant style in line of battle, with colors flying, and 
immediately drew the fire of the enemy ; a shell swept 
through the lines, near the colors, killing Curtis Flan- 
ders, of Co. I, and wounding one other ; but the regi- 
ment mov6d steadily on without breaking its lines or 
firing a shot. When within musket range it halted and 
poured in a terrific volley, with all the coolness and pre- 
cision of regular troops. The enemy broke and fiedj 
without firing a shot. By its good conduct on this 
occasion the regiment established a character as a fight- 
ing regiment, and was permitted, in general orders, to 
inscribe "Camden, April 19, 1862," upon its colors. 
The loss of the Sixth in this affair was one man killed 
and two wounded. The success of this expedition was 
the occasion of a congratulatory and complimentary 
order from Gen. Burnside, in command of the Depart- 
ment of Iforth jOarolina. Congratulatory orders were 
also received from Gen. Keno, commanding the expe- 
dition, and Gov. Berry, of New Hampshire. 

On the 22d of April, Lieut. Colonel Griffin was com- 
missioned Colonel; Major Scott was promoted to Lieut. 
Colonel, and Capt. 0. G. Dort, of campany E, to 
Major, by the choice of the officers of the regiment. 
On the 18th of June the regiment left Eoanoke Island, 
joined Burnside's expedition at Newbern, and was 
assigned to Colonel Amory's brigade, of General Fos- 
ter's division. While at Roanoke Island the Sixth 



SIXTH REGIMENT. 317 

received such instruction in tactics and discipline as 
made it afterward one of the most efficient and reliable 
regiments in the service. When it arrived at ITewbern 
its proficiency in drill and splendid appearance as a body 
of troops called forth the encomiums of general officers, 
and other regiments stationed there. 

On the 2d of July the Sixth, with other regiments, 
was ordered to proceed to the peninsula, in Virginia, 
to join Gen. McClellan, who was retreating before Lee. 
They embarked and proceeded to N"ewport l^ews, and 
instead of going up the James, to the assistance of 
McClellan, they disembarked at this point on the 10th, 
and went into camp. While in this encampment the 
Mnth Corps was organized, with General Burnside as 
its corps and department commander, and the Sixth 
was assigned to the First Brigade, Second Division. 

On the 2d of August the Second Division, under 
General Reno, embarked on board transports, and 
proceeded up Chesapeake Bay and Potomac River, 
to Aquia Creek, where it disembarked, and after halt- 
ing some days at Fredericksburg, marched to Culpeper 
Court House, and joined the army of General Pope. 
The disastrous campaign which followed was one of 
peculiar hardship and trial, and evinced the courage 
and endurance for which the Sixth was remarkable. 
On the 29th of August the retreating army found itself 
confronting the whole rebel force for the second time 
since the war began, on the field of Bull Run. At 
three o'clock on the afternoon of that day, the first 
brigade of Reno's Division was brought up, and ordered 
to attack the enemy and drive them from the woods 
in which they were massed. The brigade was formed 
with the Second Maryland on the right, the Sixth New 
Hampshire in the center, and the Forty-eighth Penn- 
sylvania on the left, and moved forward in line of battle. 
Immediately upon entering the woods the command 



318 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

was received with a sharp and murderous fire, under 
which, however, the Sixth, and Second Maryland 
pressed steadily forward; but the Forty-eighth Penn- 
sylvania gave ground to the right, and fell behind the 
Sixth New Hampshire. The regiment pushed forward 
in the most resolute manner, driving the enemy before 
them, keeping its line perfect, not a man leaving the 
ranks, not even to care for wounded or dead. The 
regiment crossed a railroad cut, and advancing one or 
two hundred yards beyond, it found itself assailed on 
every side. The wood was very thick, and amid the 
smoke of battle nothing could be discerned more than 
a few yards. Supppsing the left to be supported and 
protected by others of our own troops, it was believed 
that the fire from the left and rear must be from friends. 
To ascertain the true state of the case. Colonel Griffin 
seized the colors, and advanced in that direction, waving 
them in the air. He was met by a murderous fire, 
which proved that there were no friends of the stars 
and stripes in that direction. Finding that his regiment 
would be sacrificed unless withdrawn immediately, the 
Colonel ordered a retreat, and brought off his men 
with all possible dispatch. Of four hundred and fifty 
officers and men who went into this engagement, thirty- 
two were killed, one hundred and ten wounded, and 
sixty-eight were missing ; making a total of two hun- 
dred and ten, or nearly one-half of the whole number 
present for duty. Of the missing nearly all were either 
killed or wounded, and the wounded were all captured, 
as the enemy occupied the ground after the fight. Of 
twenty officers present on that day, five were killed, 
six wounded and two captured. Among the killed 
were Lieutenents Fuller, Ames, Moore, Prescott and 
Muchmore, Captains Pearson and Ela, and Lieutenants 
Hayes, Adams, Jackman and Titcomb were wounded, 
and Adjutant Bixby and Lieutenant Emerson made 



SIXTS BSaiMENT. 319 

prisoners. The next day the Mnth Corps was again 
put into action on the left of the line, holding the 
enemy in check, and were the last to leave the field, 
which they did just before midnight, August 30th, and 
marched in a drenching rain to Centerville, where it 
arrived next morning, the army having made a stand 
there to cover the trains. 

On the 1st of September the enemy made an attack 
at Chantilly, . when a sharp engagement ensued, which 
resulted in his repulse. In this the Sixth was actively 
engaged and did good service. Advancing over a ridge 
of ground to support troops already engaged, they met 
the Fiftieth Pennsylvania just breaking and flying in 
confusion. Seeing the Ifew Hampshire boys moving 
gallantly forward to their assistance, in a well formed 
line of battle, with colors flying, the Pennsylvania 
troops rallied promptly, and, forming on the right of 
the Sixth, returned bravely to the attack. The two 
regiments united,' and, protected by a rail fence on the 
edge of a corn field, repulsed the attack of the enemy in 
that quarter, and held them in cheek until night put an 
end to the contest. During that night and the next day 
the army fell back to the defense of Washington, and 
the Mnth Corps encamped at Alexandria. While here 
the men were rested and supplied with needed clothing 
and camp and garrison equipage. 

Lee and Jackson having crossed the Potomac, the 
army moved out from Washington under General Mc- 
Clellan, to repel the invasion. The Sixth Regiment 
moved with its brigade on the 7th of September, and 
passing through Frederick and Middletown, was present 
at the battle of South Mountain on the 13th, in which 
the division was commanded by General Sturgis, was 
used as support, and was but slightly engaged. The 
division occupied the ground won during the fight and 
the next day moved forward toward Antietam. 



320 THE GREAT REBELLION. 



BATTLE OF ANTIETAM. 



On the morning of the 17th of September, 1862, the 
troops were under arms at daybreak, and very soon 
afterward the Ninth Corps moved forward to attack the 
enemy on the extreme left. The attempt to carry the 
Stone Bridge across Antietam Creek, by the Eleventh 
Connecticut and other regiments, having failed, Stur- 
gis' division was brought up and ordered to take the 
bridge at all hazards, and seize the bights beyond. 
The regiments selected to make this desperate charge 
were the Sixth New Hampshire and Second Maryland. 
The stream was not fordable at that point, and the road 
occupied by the Union troops, which led to the bridge, 
came down to the Creek, nearly three hundred yards 
below the bridge, then turned at right angles, and ran 
along the bank of the stream with only the narrow 
stream between it and the enemy, then turned again at 
right angles to cross the' bridge. The opposite bank 
was a steep, high bluff, covered on its top and sides with 
forest trees. Behind these trees, and behind barricades 
of stones and of logs, the enemy was strongly posted, 
their fire covering every inch of ground over which our 
troops must pass to reach the bridge. The two regi- 
ments were formed in the field below where the road 
came down to the creek, some sixty or seventy rods 
below the bridge, directly under the fire of the concealed 
enemy. The remainder of the brigade lay still farther 
down the stream, under cover of fences and corn fields, 
too far away to support promptly the attacking column, 
composed as it was of two small regiments, numbering 
about one hundred and fifty men each. But the order 
of General Sturgis was to charge at once with the regi- 
ments formed by the flank, side by side. The regiments 
fixed bayonets and moved at the double quick, passing 



SIXTH REQIMENT. 321 

througli a narrow opening in a strong ctestnut fence, 
which there was not time to remove, and charged in the 
most gallant manner directly up the road toward the 
bridge. As the attacking party, led by Colonel GriflBn, 
debouched from the field into the road, the enemy from 
their intrenched position redoubled the fury of their 
fire, sweeping the head of the column with murderous 
effect. Such sweeping destruction of course checked 
the advanced columns, but the men sheltered themselves 
behind fences, logs, and whatever cover they could find, 
and bravely held the ground already gained, without 
retreating or giving way an inch. Other troops were 
brought up and put in position behind a bluff, directly 
front of the bridge, whence such a terrible fire of mus- 
ketry was poured upon the enemy that they abandoned 
their position and fled. Four regiments now advaced 
across the bridge without opposition, and the Sixth was 
the first to advance up the bluff' beyond, and from its 
line on the top of the ridge, where it received a shower 
of shot and shell from the rebel batteries in the distance. 
The Mnth Corps crossed the creek, formed its' lines and 
advanced to attack the rebel right. During this move- 
ment, which was at first successful, some of the troops 
advanced as far as the village of Sharpsburg itself. 
The Sixth having suffered severely in the early part of 
the day, was held in reserve. The corps was finally 
driven back just in advance of the brigade, and that 
night the regiment was again put into the front line, to 
perform picket duty. In this most severe battle the 
Sixth behaved with great gallantry, and was highly 
complimented by General Burnside. It suffered a loss 
of nearly one-fifth of its whole number present, in killed 
and wounded. A few days after the battle the whole 
corps passed over Maryland Heights, and encamped in 
Pleasant Valley, where it remained for several weeks. 
On the 4th of October Lieut. Colonel Scott, who had 



S22 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

been absent, sick, since the regiment left Newport News, 
resigned, and Captain Heniy H. Pearson, of Company 
C, was promoted to fill the position. Major Dort also 
resigned, and Adjutant Bixby, who had been ex- 
changed and rejoined the regiment, was promoted to 
Major. 

On the 27th of October the army moved from Pleasant 
Valley, crossed the Potomac by pontoon bridges at 
Berlin, took up its line of March up the valley east of 
Blue Eidge, with Richmond foi* its objective point. 
Near "Waterloo ■ Bridge, the enemy appeared on the 
right flank, and Sturgis' division was sent out to hold 
them in check. Considerable skirmishing ensued, in 
which the regiment was engaged, but suffered no loss. 

On the 19th of November the army arrived at Fal- 
mouth, in front of Fredericksburg, and encamped on 
high ground north of the Phillips house. 

BATTLE OF FKBDBBICKSBTJRG, 

On the 12th of December a part of the army crossed 
the river and occupied the city of, Fredericksburg. The 
Ninth Corps bivouacked in the streets that night. The 
bloody assault upon the enemy's works commenced 
about noon on the 13th. About one o'clock, p. m., the 
Sixth Regiment advanced with its brigade under a 
shower of shot and shell, and entering the field to the 
right of the railroad, moved steadily up the slope 
against the enemy's works. That slope was completely 
swept by the rebel musketry and artillery fire, and in 
some places the ground was already covered with dead 
and wounded; yet nothing could exceed the coolness 
and gallantry with which the regiment advanced to the 
charge. Desperate and repeated attempts were made to 
advance oyer the crest and attack the enemy in their 
works, but so destructive was the fire immediately 



SIXTH EEQIMENT. 323 

upon reaching the brow of the hill, so perfect was the 
knowledge of the enemy of every movement of the 
Union troops, and so completely had the rebels the com- 
mand of the ground, that it was found to be impossible 
to get at them. Three regiments immediately on the 
right of the Sixth, broke and fled, leaving a large gap, 
yet not a man of this ;regiment left his position or 
faltered for a moment. This perilous position was held 
until dark, when the line was withdrawn and took shel- 
ter in the town, leaving only a line of pickets to hold 
the crest. "When the army withdrew across the river 
the Sixth was one of the last regiments to retire. In 
this engagement the regiment suffered a loss of seventy- 
five men, or about one-third of the number that went 
into the action, killed and wounded. 

Early in February, 1863, the Sixth regiment was 
transferred, along with its corps, to Newport News, 
where they had good quarters, were supplied with cloth- 
ing, camp and garrison equipage, a thorough system 
of drill was adopted, and the condition of the troops 
was brought up to the highest state of perfection. On 
the 18th of March Gen. Dix, commanding the Depart- 
ment, reviewed the whole corps. The display was oi^e 
of the most brilliant ones ever seen in this country. 

General Burnside having been ordered to the Depart- 
ment of the Ohio, the Mnth Corps was transferred to 
Kentucky at his request, and proceeded to Cincinnati 
and thence the Sixth Regiment, with its brigade was sent 
to Lexington, which place it reached on the first of April, 
and after encamping there for a few days, marched to 
Winchester. From "Winchester it proceeded to Rich- 
mond on the 18th ; to Paint Lick Creek on the 3d of 
May, and to Lancaster on the 10th. Here it remained 
until the 23d, encamped, enjoying the pure, fresh air 
and fragrant fields of the "Blue Grass Region" of 



324 THE GREAT BEBELLION. 

Kentucky, the finest country the soldiers had ever seen. 
On the 30th of May Gen. James Nagle resigned, and 
Ool. Griffin was permanently assigned to the command 
of the brigade, it being the First Brigade, Second 
Division, Mnth Army Corps. The brigade consisted 
of the Sixth and Mnth ISTew Hampshire, Second Mary- 
land, Forty-eighth Pennsylvania, and Seventh and 
Twelfth Rhode Island Eegiments. 

The rebel General Joseph E. Johnston, having collect- 
ed an army at Jackson, Mississippi, and advanced* to 
threaten General Grant's rear. General William T. 
Sherman was sent out with a force to watch and con- 
front him. Col. Griffin's brigade was ordered to report 
to General Sherman, and an intrenched line was formed 
along Oak Ridge, guarding the roads across Big Black 
river. A few days later the whole corps joined General 
Sherman, and a second intrenched line was formed in 
rear of the first, extending from Hayne's and Snyder's 
bluff's, through Milldale, and along the high ground 
east of Vicksburg. 

General Pemberton surrendered the city of Vicksburg 
to General Grant, on the 4th of July, 1863, and the 
same day nearly the whole of Grant's and Sherman's 
armies moved out to meet Johntson, encamping that 
night near the Big Black. Johnston, hearing of Pem- 
berton's surrender, fell back upon Jackson, closely 
pursued by Sherman. The weather was extremely 
hot, even for that climate, the streams were dry, and the 
men suffered severely from the oppressive heat and the 
want of water. Arriving at Jackson, July 10th, the 
enemy seemed disposed to defend the town. An attack 
was immediately made by the Ninth Corps, which re- 
sulted in driving him behind his intrenchments. The 
place was invested and dispositions made for the final 
assault. Early on the morning of the 13th of July, 
while Colonel Griffin was in change of the Mnth Corps, 



SIXTH REGIMENT. 325 

having three brigades under his command, the enemy 
made a sudden and furious attack, with a view to break- 
ing the Union lines ; but they were received with 
much coolness and steadiness by the Sixth New Hamp- 
shire, who deliberately poured upon them a most 
destructive fire, and they were repulsed with great 
slaughter. On the morning of the 16th the Sixth was 
sent out at two o'clock, to make a reconnoissance, 
when it was discovered that the rebels had evacuated 
the place, and our troops took possession of the town. 
After destroying the public property the army, on the 
20 th of July, commenced its march to return to 
Vicksburg. 

On the 23d the Sixth reached its old camp at Milldale, 
where the men inhaled the deadly malaria of the 
swamps of Yazoo, whose very name signifies in the 
Indian tongue, the "River of Death." The effects 
of that climate upon the regiment and upon the whole 
corps were more disastrous than that of the severest 
battle. K"early all were attacked with malarial fever, 
chills and fever, congestive chills, or some disorder 
incident to that climate, and large numbers of them 
died. On the 5th of August the regiment embarked 
with its brigade on board transports and proceeded up 
the river to Cairo, and thence b/ rail to Cincinnati, 
where it arrived on the 20th. The sickness that pre- 
vailed on board the transports was terrible, and almost 
universal. Almost every night, as the troops " lay up " 
on account of low water and the consequent danger 
from sand bars, a little party would be seen with lan- 
terns, sadly making its way on shore to bury some 
comrade who had fallen a victim to disease. Lieut. 
Eli Wentworth, Eegimental Quartermaster, was one 
of the victims, he having died at Milldale on the 18th 
of July, while the regiment was absent at Jackson. 
Halting a few days at Covington, it proceeded by rail 



326 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

to Mcholasville, and encamped near Camp JSTelsoii, offi- 
cers and men still suffering terribly from the effects 
of that southern climate. Large numbers were sent 
to the hospitals, and many died. 

On the 9th of September the brigade was divided, and 
a part of the troops were sent over the Cumberland 
mountains to join General Burnside in East Tennessee, 
while the others remained in Kentuclsy. Col. Griffin 
proceeded to East Tennessee, in command of the divis- 
ion. The Sixth Regiment was ordered to Frankfort, tc 
do provost duty, where it remained about two weeks, 
and was then sent to Russellville, to protect the inhabit- 
ants from the enemy's cavalry, who were constantly 
making incursions into the Southern portion of the 
State. "While here the regiment did valuable service, 
scouting and chasing guerillas from the country, seizing 
the horses and mules of well known rebels, and using 
them for that purpose. Lieut. Colonel Pearson was 
commander of the post and Major Bixby was in com- 
mand of the regiment. 

Colonel Griffin having been placed in command of 
Camp Nelson, a large and important post, the Sixth was 
on the 25th of October ordered there to do provost duty 
in connection with other regiments. While here the 
regiment re-enlisted for another term of three years, or 
during the war. The men re-enlisted in such numbers 
as to secure for themselves a veteran organization of ten 
companies, while many of the other regiments were 
reduced to mere battalions of two or more companies^ 
The regiment left Camp Nelson on the 16th of January, 
1864, for New Hampshire, on a thirty days' veteran 
furlough, leaving the recruits and those who did not 
re-enlist, under the command of Captain S. G. Goodwin^ 
assisted by Captain Crossfield, Adjutant Smith, Ass't 
Surgeon Noyes and Chaplain Dor4/*At Covington 
some days were spent in making out the re-enlistmeni 



SIXTH BEOIMENT. - 327 

papers, and on the 20tli of January, two hundred and 
eighty-eiglit enlisted men, or more than three-fourths of 
the whole number who had served the required length 
of time, were re-mustered into the United States service 
as veterans. The regiment arrived at Keene — ^the place 
of its original rendezvous — on the 28th, where the citi- 
zens gave the men a cordial public reception and supper, 
and provided them with comfortable quarters in the 
town hall. The next day the regiment went to Concord, 
where it received another splendid ovation — a procession, 
and dinner in Phenix Hall. The men were furloughed 
and went to their respective homes. They re-assembled 
at Concord on the 29th of February, but were immedi- 
ately given ten days extra, by order of the Secretary of 
War. On the 10th of March the men again assembled 
at Concord, under orders to return to the Department 
of the Ohio, and took cars for the west. Arriving at 
Manchester, Colonel Griffin received a telegraphic dis- 
patch from the Secretary of "War, ordering the regiment 
back to camp, to await further orders. It returned to 
Concord and remained there in camp until the 18th, 
when it proceeded, in compliance with orders, to join 
the Mnth Army Corps, which was then re-assembling 
at Annapolis, Maryland. 

At Annapolis the recruits were brought forward from 
Camp l*?'elson and assigned to companies with the 
veterans, a thorough system of drill and discipline was 
instituted, new arms were famished the men, and the 
regiment was brought up to a high standard, both as 
regarded numbers and effectiveness. Upon the re- 
organization of the Mnth Corps Colonel Griffin was 
assigned to the command of the Second Brigade, Second 
Division, composed of the^ Sixth, Mnth and Eleventh 
New Hampshire, Thirty-first and Thirty-second Maine, 
and Seventeenth Vermont Eegiments, leaving the Sixth 



328 THE OBEAT REBELLION. 

again udder command of Lieut. Colonel Pearson, one^ 
of the best officers of his rank in the service. 

On the 23d of April the Corps joined the Army oi 
the Potomac, under General Grant. Passing through 
Washington it was reviewed by President Lincoln, from 
the balcony of Willard's Hotel. After two days spent 
at Alexandria, procuring supplies and transportation, 
the Corps again moved on, by way of Fairfax Court 
House, and joined the Army of the Potomac at the 
Eapidan, and on the 5th of May crossed the river at 
Germania Ford, and bivouacked on the field, in rear 
of Sedgwick's Corps, which had been engaged during 
the day. 

At two o'clock on the morning of the 6th, the troops 
were in motion, and moved to attack the enemy in the 
direction of " Parker's Store." At daylight Griffin's 
brigade was formed for attack, with the Sixth deployed 
as skirmishers, as usual, and advanced about one mile, 
when the enemy was met in force, and a desultory fire 
kept up during the greater part of the forenoon, without 
any advantage being gained on either side. About 
eleven o'clock orders were received to move by the 
fiank, with a view to assist in repelling an advance of 
the enemy on the left of the corps. The movement 
was made with much difficulty through a dense thicket. 
The line of the brigade was formed behind those of 
other brigades of the same corps, who were holding 
the ground, but making no attempt to advance. Those 
brigades were lying down. General Burnside himself 
was present, and gave the order, " Let Griffin attack." 
The brigade advanced promptly, in line" of battle, at 
the command, and pressing directly over those who 
were lying down, charged, along the whole line. The 
other brigades rose up and followed, shouting and 
cheering. The Sixth fixed bayonets and dashed upon 
the rebels in the most gallant manner, breaking their 



aiXTS BEQIMENT. 329 

line and capturing seven commissioned officers and a 
hundred and six men. Along the whole line of this 
brigade the attack was successful, and the rebel line 
was rapidly giving way, but the line to the left did not 
advance, thus giving the enemy time and opportunity 
to turn their whole attention to this break in their line. 
Bringing up re-enforcements, and charging in their 
turn, the line was compelled to recede a short distance, 
but held the ground of their original lines, and in- 
trenched for the night. The Corps was withdrawn the 
next day and massed in rear of the Lacy House. The 
loss of the regiment in this engagement was one officer 
and forty-four men killed and wounded. 

On the 12th of May occurred the general engagement 
known as the battle of Spottsylvania Court House. 
Orders had been given to attack at four o'clock in the 
morning. The Mnth Corps held the extreme left of 
the line of the army, and was to advance to the right as 
well as to the front, and unite with Hancock's Second 
Corps. At the appointed time the corps moved off to 
the right in column by brigades — Griffin's brigade lead- 
ing, the Sixth Regiment occupying the left center of the 
brigade line. Hearing the roar of Hancock's guns, 
Griffin made for the point whence the sound proceeded. 
Advancing through the pine woods, under a sharp fire, 
and driving the enemy's skirmishers before it, the brig- 
ade swung into line along side of the Second Corps, 
united with its left, and seized a favorable position on 
the further edge of the wood, looking out upon an open 
field toward the enemy's lines, and very near their 
works. Just at this time masses of the rebels were 
seen emerging from the opposite wood at double quick, 
in a furious charge upon the left of Hancock's Corps, 
which had become somewhat disorganized from the suc- 
cessful attack it had just previously made. Taking this 
whole column of rebels in front and flank, the brigade 



THE GREAT REBELLION. 

received the terrible onset with indomitable obstinacy, 
hurling them back in^ confusion, and strewing the 
ground with dead and wounded, A murderous and 
incessant fire was kept up on both sides during nearly 
the whole day, but that position was held until the 
enemy withdrew, six days later. In this brilliant move- 
ment, in which Col. Griffin won his star, and which, 
without doubt, saved Hancock's Corps fi-om being 
routed, the Sixth Eegiment bore a conspicuous part, 
seizing an advanced position, and holding out stubborn- 
ly, when others were disposed to quail. The loss of 
the regiment in this battle was sixty-eight men killed 
and wounded. 

On the 18th, while holding this line, an advance on ' 
the enemy's lines was ordered, and the Sixth, with 
others, moved gallantly forward into the wood, seizing 
a small eminence within a few yards of the enemy's 
line, and holding this perilous position until withdrawn 
by order of General Burnside, on the afternoon of the 
same day. In this affair Captain S. D. Quarles was 
severely wounded. That night the army abandoned 
its position, and moved to the left, and on the 20th 
and 21st of May pushed on to the Iforth Anna river, 
where the regiment bore its part in the engagement, 
but was not in the front line, being held with, the 
reserves. On the 26th, while reconnoitering the move- 
ments and position of the enemy, Lieut. Colonel Pear- 
son was shot through the head by a rebel rifleman. 
There was not a more promising young officer in the 
whole corps, and the regiment mourned his loss with 
heartfelt sorrow. He had been for some time in com- 
mand of the regiment, and his loss was very severely 
felt. Major Bixby succeeded to the command, and soon 
obtained the good will of officers and men. The 
regiment was again engaged with its brigade, at Ptol- 
opotamy Creek, on the 21st, driving the enemy from 



8IXTS REGIMENT. 831 

his position. In the several engagements from the 16th 
to the 31st of May, the tegiment suffered a loss of three 
officers and thirteen men. 

On the 3d of June a general engagement took place 
at Gold Harbor, in which the Sixth was actively en- 
gaged, near Bethesda Church^Griffin's Brigade occu- 
pying the extreme left of the line of the army. The 
regiment lost-three officers and twenty-two men wound- 
ed, and four enlisted men killed. The next day the 
regiment moved to Cold Harbor, and was constantly 
under fire during the several days the army occupied 
that position. ' Lieut. Joseph M. Shephard was killed ; 
Captain S. G. Goodwin, Lieuts. Orange B. Otis and 
John Curtin wounded. 

On the night of the 12th of June the army withdrew 
from Cold Harbor, and moved for Petersburg, where 
It arrived on the afternoon of the 16th. On that night 
the Mnth Corps was ordered to attack at dayUght next 
morning. Griffin's brigade was selected for this duty, 
supported by Curtin's brigade of the same division. 
General Potter commanding the division, entrusted 
the planning and execution of the attack to General 
Griffiji. The troops were led under cover of darkness, 
to a ravine within ai hundred yards of the enemy's 
works, and there formed for attack. So near was the 
position to the rebels that all orders had to be given 
in whispers. The leading regiments were ordered to 
observe the strictest silence, and to advance without 
firing a shot, carrying the works at the point of the 
bayonet. As day began to dawn the order was given 
to advance. The men moved quickly and noiselessly 
upon the rebel lines, took the enemy completely by 
surprise, capturing or putting to flight the whole force, 
and sweeping their line for a mile in extent. By this 
movement nearly one thousand prisoners fell into the 
hands of tiie Union troops, besides four pieces of artil- 



332 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

lery, caissons and horses, more than a thousand stand 
of small arms, and a quantity of ammunition. A wide 
breach was made in the enemy's lines, and there was 
nothing to prevent an advance into the city, had sup- 
ports come up in time. But the other corps did not 
advance, and when the First and Third Divisions at- 
tacked, at three o'clock in the afternoon, the enemy 
was prepared to meet them, and they were repulsed 
with immense slaughter. 

On the 18th the enemy was driven back to Ms inner 
line of fortifications, and the army took up that line 
from the Appomattox, running south, which it fortified 
with much labor and skill, and occupied with some 
slight changes during the succeeding ten months, ex- 
tending it at different times to the south and west, 
until it nearly encompassed the city. The Ninth Corps 
occupied this part of the line until the 20th of August, 
and during the whole of that time the picket firing was 
incessant, both day and night. It was one continual 
engagement, and the troops were constantly under fire 
for nine weeks — alternately laboring on the intrench- 
ments, or watching the enemy with musket in hand, 
and firing whenever there was a head to be seen in the 
opposing line. The loss, in consequence, was very 
heavy, amounting to two officers and sixteen men killed, 
and six officers and one hundred and two men wounded. 
So arduous was the duty from the 5th of May to thp 
20th of August, that both officers and men were so 
completely exhausted and worn out, from constant 
hardship, watching and exertion, that they could lie 
down and sleep soundly under the booming of cannon, 
the rattle of musketry and the whistle of bullets. 
While lying in this position, on the 15th of July, Lieut. 
Colonel Bixby received a wound in the shoulder, which 
disabled him for three months. During this time the 
command devolved upon Capt. Eobert L. Ela. 



SIXTH BEQIMENT. 333 

The "Mine" in front of Petersburg was excavated 
by the Second Division of the Mnth Corps, the labor 
being performed principally by the Forty-eighth Penn- 
sylvania. The place of the Sixth Regiment in the line 
of intrenchments was directly in front of and covering 
the mouth of the mine. On the night of the 29th of 
July, every thing being in readiness, the troops were 
put in position for the assault, and just after daylight 
on the morning of the 30th, the mine was sprung. The 
assault was led by the First Division, General Ledlie, 
which failed to do the work assigned to it. The Second 
Division, and particularly the brigade to which the 
Sixth belonged, did every thing that could be done; 
pushing on in advance of all other troops, and driving 
the rebels before them by hand to hand fighting. But 
the first hour being lost by the halting of Ledlie's 
division in the " crater," thus blocking the way and 
giving the enemy time to collect their force and con- 
ftentrate their fire, it was too late to retrieve the day, 
despite the most strenuous exertions. The troops were 
withdrawn in the afternoon of the same day, by order 
of General Grant. In this disastrous affair the Sixth 
Regiment bore a brave and conspicuous part, losing 
Capt. Crossfield and Lieut. Upton, killed, and Captains 
Ela and Greenleaf, Adjutant Smith and Lieut. Hans- 
comb, wounded. The entire loss of the regiment was 
fifty-two killed and wounded. 

Among those coi^spicuous for gallantry on this occa- 
sion was Sergeant Major Abraham Cohn, who was 
wounded, and who afterward received one of the medals 
of honor authorized by Congress to be given to merito- 
rious soldiers. The medal was awarded by the Secretary 
of War, on recommendation of the brigade, division and 
corps commanders, approved by General Meade, and 
transcribed by Adjutant General Townsend, with quite 
a flattering letter accompanying. The medal bears the 



834 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

following inscription: "The Congress, to Sergeant 
Major Abraham Cohn, Sixth New Hampshire Vet. 
Vols." On the 20th of August the Ninth -Corps was 
engaged in the battle of the Weldon Railroad, aiding 
in repulsing a furious attack of the enemy on the Fifth 
Corps. The Sixth Regiment sustained itself handsome- 
ly, losing one man killed and several wounded. 

On the 30th of September the battle of Poplar Spring 
Church took place, in which theMnth Corps partici- 
pated. The Sixth Regiment was in the thickest of the 
fight, and lost in killed, wounded and missing, four 
officers and eighty-seven men. The field was held, and 
a new line of intrenchments was thrown up, in which 
the regiment remained until December, On the 19th 
of October Capt. S. D. Quarles, who had been absent 
on account of severe wounds received on the 18th of 
May, returned to the regiment, and was immediately 
mustered as Major. 

The Ninth Corps returned to its original position in 
front of Petersburg, early in December, holding the 
right of the line of the army of the Potomac, next to 
the Appomattox river. Griffin's brigade occupied the 
left of the Corps, including Forts Sedgwick, " Hell," 
Davis, and Alexander Hayes, and batteries No. 24 and 
25. The Sixth Regiment lay in rear of Fort Alexander 
Hayes, occupying this camp until the final assault on 
the 2d of April, 1865, which gave us Petersburg, and 
consequently Richmond. On the evening of the 1st 
of April orders were received to be prepared to unite 
in a general attack on the enemy's lines the next morn- 
ing, at four o'clock. At ten o'clock the same evening, 
orders were received to attack the enemy's picket line 
at once, and the Sixth and other regiments of its brig- 
ade marched out and attacked that night to the left of 
Fort Davis, capturing eight officers and two hundred 
and forty-one men, and carrying their picket line for 



SIXTH BEQIMENT. 335 

more than half a mile in extent. The troops were 
withdrawn, and transferred in the darkness to the 
Jerusalem plank road, and massed to the left of and 
near Fort Sedgwick. The ditches of the Union in- 
trenched line were filled with water; as well as those 
of the enemy. Both these were to be passed, then the 
strong abcdtis of their main line was to be cut away or 
^removed, their main ditches passed, their parapets 
scaled, and their works carried. The brigade was 
formed in column by regiments in line of battle, and 
the Sixth was near the head of the column. Just at 
daybreak, at a preconcerted signal, the column advanced 
to the charge. Nothing could exceed the coolness and 
intrepidity with which both officers and men, under a 
terrific fire of grape, canister and musketry, advanced 
to the assault. Capturing the rebel pickets as they 
passed, they dashed upon the enemy's main works, 
tearing away their abattis, sweeping over their parapets, 
and carrying all before them. Hundreds of prisoners 
were sent to the rear, and their complete line of works 
in front of Fort Sedgwick, with many pieces of artil- 
lery, fell into our hands. The Sixth Regiment dashed 
upon a small fort, near Fort Mahone, planted its colors 
on the parapet, captured four pieces of artillery, and 
turned them upon the enemy. The rebels brought 
up re-enforcements, and made a furious counter charge, 
but the works were firmly held. During the night the 
enemy withdrew, and the next morning at daybreak 
our forces entered the city without opposition. For 
gallant and highly meritorious conduct in this affair, 
Lieut. Colonel Bixby was brevetted Colonel, Major 
Quarles Lieut. Colonel, and Captain S. G-. Goodwin 
Major. The regiment lost six men killed and twenty- 
five wounded. 

From Petersburg the Sixth Eegiment marched with its 
corps in pursuit of Lee and his army, arriving at Burks- 



336 THE OBEAT REBELLION. 

ville on the 9tli of April. On the 20tli, the rebel' forces 
having been captured or dispersed, and the war being at 
an end, the regiment marched to City Point, and from 
there sailed for Alexandria, where it arrived on the 27th. 
On the Ist of June Lieut. Col. Bixby was promoted to 
Colonel, Major Quarles to Lieut. Colonel, and Captain 
Robert L. Ela to Major. On the 17th of July the regi- 
ment was mustered out of the United States service, 
being the last remaining regiment of the Second Divis- 
ion, Mnth Corps, of which Gen. Griffin was then in 
command. 

It has been said of it that " ISo regiment from the 
. State and none in the army had won a prouder name, or 
made a more honorable record than the gallant old veter- 
an Sixth. N'o regiment had seen more severe cam- 
paigning, done more or better service, or been oftener 
under fire. Few regiments went through the war with 
so little internal dissension and so much harmony among 
officers. Few regiments endured the hardships of the 
service with so much fortitude and so little grumbling; 
for they were men whose hearts were in the^ work of 
crushing out the rebellion. When, at various times, 
calls were made for the names of men to whom medals 
should be awarded for gallant conduct upon the field, 
few names were ever given, for the reason that so many 
had done well it was hard to designate a small number. 
Captains would report that almost every one of their 
men might be recommended, but it would be invidious 
to name a few." 

The Sixth Eegiment was actively engaged in the fol- 
lowing battles : 

Camden, l!?'orth Carolina, April 19, 1862. 

Second Bull Run, Va., August 29, 1862. 

Chantilly, Va., September 1, 1862. 

South Mountain, Md., September 13, 1862. 



SIXTH REGIMENT. 337 

Antietam, Md., September 17, 1862. 

Fredericksburg, Va., December 13, 1862. 
Siege of Vicksburg, Mississippi, 
Jackson, Mississippi, 

Wilderness, Va., May 6, 1864. 
Spottsylvania Court House, Va., May 12 and 18, 1864. 

North Anna Eiver, Va., May 24, 1864. 

Ptolopotamy Creek, " May 31, 1864. 

Betbesda Church, " June 2, 1864. 

Cold Harbor, " June 3, 1864. 

Petersburg, ^ ^" June 16, 17 and 18, 1864. 

"Weldon Railroad, S July 30, 1864. 

Poplar Spring Church, *** September 30, 1864. 

Hatcher's Run, " October 27, 1864. 

Petersburg, " April 2, 1865. 

In addition to these the regiment participated in a 
great number of reconnoissances and skirmishes, in 
which it lost no men. Many days during the campaign 
in the "Wilderness, and for nine weeks before Petersburg, 
the regiment was constantly under fire and lost men 
almost every day, making a large aggregate. The Sixth 
was more often sent forward as skirmishers than any 
other regiment. It always did the skirmishing for its 
brigade, and often for its division. Company C almost 
always skirmished for the regiment. The regiment was 
particularly well drilled for this especial duty. While 
at Roanoke and Hatteras Islands the men were drilled 
and practiced every day for three months as sharp- 
shooters, and they were considered the best shots in 
the Mnth Army Corps. 

The Sixth Regiment arrived at Concord on the 22d of 
July, 1865, where it was given a formal reception by the 
State authorities and citizens, and the men were imme- 
diately paid off and discharged. 



338 TEE QBE AT REBELLION. 



SEVENTH REGIMENT. 



On the 2d of September, 1861, Joseph C. Abbott, 
of Manchester, late Adjutant General of the State, 
received authority directly from the War Department 
at Washington, to raise a regiment of infantry in New 
Hampshire, and uniform, arm, equip and make it ready 
for the field. At that time and very soon after, the 
State ordered the raising of four regiments of infantry, 
a battery, a company of sharpshooters, and a battalion 
of cavalry. The raising of the Seventh was regardea 
somewhat in the light of an individual enterprise, and 
was therefore surrounded by many difficulties and em- 
barrassments, and its success was thought by some to 
be quite doubtful. The State authorities offered to 
men enlisting in this the same bounty, ten dollars, that 
they paid those entering other regiments, and in other 
ways gave to the undertaking such encouragement as 
they could without interfering with their own imme- 
diate plans. The headquarters of the regiment were 
established at Manchester, and on the 2d of October 
General Abbott was commissioned Lieut. Colonel — ^he 
waving his right to the position of Colonel only on, con- 
dition that it should be given to some graduate of "West 
Point. There was an understanding between the State 
authorities and General Abbott, from the first, that 
such men should be commissioned as he should desig- 
nate. He nominated First Lieut. H. S. Putnam, of 
the United States Topographical Engineers and a native 
of the State, as Colonel, and Daniel Smith, of Dover, 
as Major, and they were commissioned by the Governor. 
The requisite number of tnen were enlisted and the 



SEVENTH BEaiMENT. ^89 

organization and muster in of tlie regiment was com- 
pleted on the 14tli of December. The following were 
the field, staff and company officers of the regiment, 
and their official record, during the whole period of 
its service ■ 

FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS. 

Colonels — Haldimand S. Putnam, of Cornish. 

KUled at Fort Wagner, S. C, July 18, 1863. 

Joseph C: Abbott, of Manchester. 

Appointed Brigadier General U. S. Vols, by brevet, for gallant services at 
the capture of Fort Fisher, N. C, to slate from Jan. 15, 1865. Mustered out 
July 20, 1865. 

Lieut. Colonels — Joseph C. Abbott, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Colonel July 22, 1868. 

Thomas A. Henderson, of Dover. 

Killed at Deep Run, Va., Aug. 16, 1864. 

Augustus "W. E-ollins, of RoUinsford. 

Wounded Oct. 7, 1864. Appointed Colonel U. S. Vols., by brevet, for gal- 
lant and meritorious conduct at the storming of Fort Fisher, N. C, to date 
from March 13, 1865. Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

Majors — ^Daniel Smith, of Dover. 

Died of disease Aug. 26, 1862. 

Thomas A. Henderson, of Dover. 

Promoted to Lieut. Colonel July 22, 1863. 

Augustus "W. Rolhns, of RoUinsford. 

Promoted to Lieut. Colonel Sept. 30, 1864. 

Jeremiah S. Durgin, of Fisherville. 

Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

Adjutants — Thomas ^. Henderson, of Dover. 

Promoted to Major Aug. 26, 1862. 

Henry G. Webber, of Charlestown. 

Dismissed Nov. 12, 1864. 

John Greene, of Concord. 

Appointed Captain U. S. Vols, by brevet, for gallant and meritorious 
conduct at the storming of Fort Fisher, N. C. , to date from March 13, 1865. 
Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

Quartermasters — Andrew H. Young, of Dover. 

Promoted to Captain and A. Q. M., Nov. 25, 1862. 

George S. Hanson, of Dover. 

Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

Surgeons — ^William "W. Brown, of Manchester. 

Resigned July 22, 1864. 



340 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

Sylvanus Bunton, of Manchester. 

Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

Ass't Surgeons — ^Henry Boynton, of "Woodstock, Vt. 

Resigned Jan. 24, 1864. 

William H. Smart, jr., of Concord. 

Resigned Not. 20, 1862. 

Moses S. "Wilson, of Salisbury. 

Honorably discharged June 17, 1864. 

Sylvanus Bunton, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Surgeon Aug. 24, 1864. 

George T. Perry, of Manchester. 

Mustered out July 20, 1865. 
Chaplain — Joseph C. Emerson, of Fisherville. 

Captured at Newmarket Roads, Va., Sept. 20, 1864. Returned Jon. 14, 
1865. Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

Sergeant Majors — George H. Elliott. 

Discharged for disability Nov. 1862. 

George F. McCabe, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Second Lieut July 20, 1863. 

WiUiam McLeod Moore. 
Re-enlisted Feb. 22, 1864. Discharged for disability July 2, 1864. 

Edwin D. Rand, of Rye. 

Promoted to Captain Jan. 1, 1865. 

Augustus L. Litchfield. 

Mustered out July 2rf, 1865. 
Quartermaster Sergeants — George S. Hanson, of Dover. 

Promoted to Quartermaster Nov. 26, 1862. 

Darius Merrill, of Manchester. 

Mustered out Dec. 22, 1864. 

James A. Hills. 

Mustered but July 20, 1865. 
Commissary Sergeants — ^Henry G. LoweU. 

Re-enlisted Feb. 28, 1864. Promoted to Second Lieut, to date from Feb. 6. 
1864. 

James M. Seavey, of Dover. 

Promoted to First Lieut May 1, 1865. 

Thomas Bush. 

Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

Hospital Stewards — ^William G. Brown. 

Mustered out Dec. 22, 1864. 

Henry S. Bunton, of Manchester. 

Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

Principal Musicians — ^Hiram S. Clifford. 

Reduced to ranks and assigned to Co. 0. 



SEVENTH BEOIMENT. 341 

Avery Bixby. 

Re-enlisted Feb. 27, 1864. Mustered out July 20, 1865. 
Horace P. Buel. 

Mustered out Dec. 22, 1864. 
Patrick McKenna. 

Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

COMPANY OFFICERS. 

Co. A. — Captaias — Jona. F. Cotton, of Strafford. 

Resigned Feb. 8, 1864. 
Charles Hooper, of Somersworth. 

Wounded May 16, 1864. Mustered out Dec. 22, 1864. 

Charles P. Dennison. 

Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

•j^ First Lieuts. — Granville P. Mason, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Captain Not. 1, 1862. 

Charles Hooper, of Somersworth. 

Promoted to Captain Feb. 6, 1864. 

Paul Whipple, of N'ew Boston. 

Promoted to Captain Dec. 12, 1864. 

Charles P. Dennison. 

Promoted to Captain Dec. 22, 1864. 

James M. Seavey, of Dover. 

Mustered out July 20, 1866. 

Second Lieuts. — ^Virgil H. Gate, of Manchester. 

Promoted t» First Lieut. July 23, 1862. 

Calvin Shedd, of Enfield. 

Resigned Dec. 31, 1863. 

Mansel Otis, of Claremont. 

Mustered out Dec. 22, 1864. 

Co. B. — Captains — Orlando Lawrence, of !Cfashua. 

Dismissed Oct. 28, 1862. 

Granville P. Mason, of Manchester. 

Mustered out Oct 81, 1864. 

Charles A. Lawrence, of Nashua. 

Transferred to Co. G. 

Edwin D. Eand, of Rye. 

Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — ^David B. Currier, of Danville. 

Resigned April 28, 1862. 

Ezra Davis, of Nashua. 

Wounded July 18, 1863. Died of wounds Aug. 6, 1863. 



342 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

George "W. Taylor, of Salem. 

KiUed at OluBtee, Fla„ Feb. 20, 1864. 

Heber J. Davis, of Hancock. 
Wounded BeTarely May 14, 1864. Wounded severely Oct. 27, 1864. 
Honorably discharged on account of wounds, March 27, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — Ezra Davis, of IN'ashua. 

Promoted to First Lieut. April 29, 1862. 

George "W. Taylor, of Salem. 
Wounded at Fort Wagner, S. C, July 18, 1868. Promoted to First Lieut. 
Aug. 7, 1863. 

James A. Cobb, of Nashua. 

Mustered out Dec. 22, 1864. 

Co. C. — Captains — Jesse E. George, of Plaistow. 

Promoted to First Lieut. April 28, 1862. 

Jerome B. House, of Lebanon. 

Wounded July 18, 1868. Died of wounds Oct. 25. 1863. 

"William C. Knowlton, of Mancbeste^, 

Cashiered Jan. T, 1864. 

Joseph E. Clifford, of Loudon. 
Wounded severely F«b. 20, 1864. Honorably discharged Oct 29, 1864. 
George if. McCabe, of Manchester. 

Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Jerome B. House, of Lebanon, 

Promoted to Captain April 29, 1862. 

Samuel Williams, of Enfield. 

Resigned July 23, 1862. 

Virgil H. Gate, of Manchester. 
Captured Jan. 9, 1863. Exchanged June 12, 1863. Killed at Fort Wag- 
ner, S. C, July 18, 1863. 

"William E. Spaulding, of HoUis. 

Mustered out Dec. 22, 1864. 

Clement E. S. Ames, of Manchester. 

Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — Samuel "Williams, of Enfield. 

Promoted to First Lieut. April 29, 1862. 

Andrew J. Lane. 

Killed at Fort Wagner, S. C, July 18, 1863. 
George F. McCabe, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Captain Nov. 80, 1864. 

Co. D. — Captains — James M. Chase, of HopMnton. 

Wounded sUghtly Feb. 20, 1864. Mustered out Dec. 22, 1864. 
Grovenor A. Curtice, of Hopkinton. 

Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Wm. C. Knowlton, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Captain Oct. 26, 1863. 



SEVENTH REQIMENT. 343 

Ferdinand Davis, of Lebanon. 

Wounded severely Feb. 20, 1864. Mustered out Dec. 22. 1864. 

Frank Robie, of Manchester. 

Transferred from Co. G. Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — Cbas. Hooper, of Somersworth. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Not. 1, 1862. 

Alfred N". Bennett, of Nashua. 

Killed at Fort Wagner, S. C, July 18, 1863. 

Charles A. Lawrence, of Nashua. 

Wounded June 18, 1864. Wounded Sept. 15, 1864. Promoted to Captain 
Not. 2, 1864 

X 

Co. E. — Captains — Jeremiah S. Dui:gin, of Fisherville. 

Promoted to Major Sept. 30, 1864. 

John A. Coburn, of HoUis. 

Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Timothy Dow, of Concord. 

Resigned Aug. 22, 1863. 

Robert Burt, of Concord. 

Wounded severely Feb. 20, 1864. Mustered out Dec. 22, 1864. 

Charles B. Wallace, of Concord. 

Mustered out July 20, 1866, 

Second Lieuts. — Henry A. Baker, of Boscawen. 

Killed at Fort Wagner, S. C, July 18, 1863. 

True "W. Arhn, of Canterbury. 

Wounded severely Feb. 20, 1864. Died of wounds March 23, 1864. 

Co. F. — Captains — ^Augustus W. Rollins, of RoUinsford. 

Promoted to Major July 23, 1863. 

Charles Cain, of Manchester. 

Mustered out Deo. 22, 1864. 

First Lieuts. — Oliver M. Clark, of Dover. 

Resigned Aug. 22, 1863. 

Francis "White, of Antrim. 

) Honorably discharged Dec. 29, 1864. 

John A. Rand, of Rye. 

Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — F. Q-. Wentworth, of RoUinsford. 

Resigned June 3, 1863. 

George Roberts, of Dover, 
Wounded and captured Feb. 20, 1864. Released. Promoted to Captain 
Dec. 22, 1864. 

Co. G. Captains — ^Henry B. Leavitt, of Pittsfield. 

Wounded and captured July 18, 1863. Died of wounds at Charleston, S. C, 
July 21. 1863. 



344 THE GREAT BEBELLA)N. 

Penuel C. Ham, of IfTew Durham, 

Mustered out Dec. 22, 1864. 

Charles A. Lawrence, of ITashua. 

Transferred to Co. B. Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Penuel C. Ham, of New Durham. 

Promoted to Captain July 22, 1863. 

Joseph E. Clifford, of Loudon. 

Promoted to Captain Jan. 1, 1864. 

William W. W. Walker. 

Promoted to Captain Oct. 28, 1864. 

Frank Eobie, of Manchester. 

Transferred to Co. D. 

George "W. Dicey, of Gilmanton. 

Mustered out July 20, 1866. 

Second Lieuts. — Joseph E. Clifford, of Loudon. 

( Promoted to First Lieut. July 23, 1863. 

Joseph A. Jacobs. 

Honorably discharged Sept. 24, 1864. 

Calvin Brown. 

Promoted to First Lieut Dec. 13, 1864. 

Co. H. — Captains — ^Nathan M. Ames, of Hollis. 

Mustered out Dec. 22, 1864. 

First Lieuts. — Alvah K. Potter, of Concord. 

Besigned June 30, 1862. 

John H. "Worcester, of Hollis. 

Wounded July 18, 1863. Died of wounds July 25, 1868. 

Charles H. Farley, of Hollis. 

Wounded severely Feb. 20, 1864. Died of wounds Feb. 24, 1864. 

John A. Coburn, of Hollis. 

Promoted t» Captain Deo. 12, 1864. 
Calvin Brown, of Ossipee. 

Transferred to Co. 1. 
Second Lieuts. — John H. Worcester, of Hollis. 

Promoted to First Lieut. June 80, 1862. 

Charles H. Farley, of Hollis. 

Promoted to First Lieut. August 6, 1863. 

Francis Lovejoy, of Hollis. 

Honorably discharged Ap^^ 28, 1864. 

Charles P. Dennison, of Lancaster. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Dec. 13, 1864. 

Co. I. — Captains — Joseph Freschl, of Manchester. 

Honorably discharged July 7, 1864. 

Paul Whipple, of New Boston. 

Transferred to Co. K, 



BEVENTE BEGIMENT. 345 

First Lieuts. — Charles Oraine, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Captain July 24, 1863. 

Hazen G-. Dodge, of Merrimack. 

Mustered out Dec. 22, 1864. 

Calvin Brown, of Ossipee. 

Transferred from Co. H. Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — ^Perley B. Bryant, of Dover. 

KiUed at Fort Wagner, S. C, July 18, 1863. 

Heber J. Davis, of Hancock. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Feb. 6, 1864. 

Henry G. Lowell. 

Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

Co. K. — Captains — ^Warren E. F. Brown, of Manchester. 

Killed at Fort Wagner, S. C, July 18, 1863. 

Leander W. Fogg, of Dover. 

Mustered out Dec. 22, 1864. 

Paul Whipple, of New Boston. 

Transferred from Co. I. Mustered out July 20, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Leander W. Fogg, of New Boston. 

Promoted to Captain July 19, 1864. 

William A. Hill, of Derry. 
Wounded severely June 17, 1864. Clustered out Dec. 22, 1864. 

Second Lieuts. — William A. Hill, of 'Sew Boston. 

Promoted to First Lieut. July 20, 1863. 

George M. Chase, of Cornish. 

Mustered out Dec. 22, 1864. 

Josiah H. Gage, of 'Sew Boston. 

Died of wounds. 



COLONEL HALDIMAND SUMNEK PUTNAM. 

Colonel Putnam was born at Cornish, Sullivan County, 
New Hampshire, on the 15th of October, 1835. He was 
a son of Hon. John L. Putnam, of that town, who "vy^as 
for many years previous to 1855 Judge of Probate for 
Sullivan County, a good farmer and highly respected 
citizen. Young Putnam received a good public school 
and academic education, and when about sixteen years 
old, entered the Military Academy at West Point, from 
which institution he graduated with high honors in 
July, 1857. Soon after receiving his degree, he was 



346 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

brevetted a Second Lieutenant in the Corps of Topo- 
graphical Engineers, and at once entered the United 
States service, and was assigned to duty at different 
points on the Western frontier. His merits were soon 
known and appreciated, and for faithful services he was 
commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the Engineer 
Corps, and subsequently promoted to Eirst Lieutenant. 
His education, ability, character and devotion to duty 
were such as to gain the respect of his superior officers 
and the confidence of the government. While on the 
Western frontier his marches were often arduous and 
his privations severe. On one journey from the western 
coast to the Utah country, in the winter, the troops of 
Lieut. Putnam's command suffered intensely from cold, 
and subsequently from hunger. They consumed their 
last ration the day before they reached the vicinity of 
Salt Lake City, where their necessities could be sup- 
plied, Li all times of hardship and privation young 
Putnam exhibited great cheerfulness, courage and deter- 
mination to overcome every obstacle and danger which 
might gather in his pathway or interfere with the per- 
formance of duty. 

Early in the year 1861, when the spirit of secession 
began to assume the hideous form and shape of treason 
to the government of the country, Lieut. Putnam was 
summoned to Washington, and entrusted with special 
messages of the greatest importance, to convey to Port 
Pickens. He traveled by railroad through the seceded 
and disaffected States, accomplished his mission, and 
was returning to Washington, when he was arrested, at 
Montgomery, Alabama, by the miUtary authorities, and 
there kept in prison several days. He was finally per- 
mitted to resume his journey, and reported to the Sec- 
retary of War, He was then assigned to an important 
and responsible position on General McDowell's staff, 
where he remained until relieved to accept the Colonel- 



SEVENTH REGIMENT. 347 

cy of the Seventh Regiment, New Hampshire Volun- 
teers. While on the staff of General McDowell Lieut. 
Putnam performed many arduous and important duties 
with a fidelity, faithfulness and skill which attracted 
the notice of his superiors in rank and evinced his great 
military ahility. In the first hattle of Bull Eun he was 
in the thickest of the fight, showed great coolness and 
hravery, but came out unharmed. 

During the first few months of the war, when treason 
in the regular army was the rule rather than the excep- 
tion, a patriotic and faithful young officer, with the edu- 
cation and ability to command was appreciated, and his 
services were sorely needed to lead the troops from 
every New England state. Young Putnam had taken 
his position upon the side of the Union, and shown most 
emphatically that he hated treason and was willing, if 
need be, to seal his loyalty with his blood. Governor 
Berry offered him the command of the Seventh Regi- 
ment, which responsibility he at first hesitated about 
accepting, feeling that he was too young for So important 
a position, but on being further urged consented at 
last to the proposition, and was commissioned on the 
15th of October, 1861. Soon after, with permission 
from the War Department, Colonel Putnam joined his 
regiment, which had been raised by Lieut. Colonel 
Joseph C. Abbott, at Manchester, assumed command, 
and entered with zeal upon the discharge of his duties, 
which were by no means light or easy, and soon brought 
his command into a high state of discipline and drill. 
On the 14th of January, 1862, Colonel Putnam left New 
Hampshire with his regiment for the seat of war. After 
four weeks passed in barracks in New York City, the 
regiment was ordered to Tortugas Island, situated on 
one of the Florida Keys, and was at that time the prin- 
cipal depot for the distribution of rations and munitions 
of war to the forts and military posts of the South. 



348 THE ORE AT REBELLION. 

Colonel Putnam immediately on his arrival there asr 
sumed command of the post, the regiment being the 
only troops at that point, except a few regulars. Here 
the regiment remained, stationed, at Fort Jefferson, 
four months. Afterward the command was located at 
St. Augustine, Fla., Port Eoyal, S. C, and in the vicin- 
ity of Charleston. The first important action in which 
the Seventh Regiment was engaged was the memorable 
assault upon Fort "Wagner. For several months preced- 
ing iiiis engagement Colonel Putnam had been an acting 
Brigadier General, and was fighting with that rank at 
the time he was killed. His command consisted of his 
own and several regiments from the middle States. In 
the terrible assault upon Fort "Wagner he displayed the 
most sublime courage -and bravery,' leading his command 
through a most deadly storm of shot and shell, encourag- 
ing his men by his own gallant example, until he fell 
mortally wounded, close up to the enemy's works. 

In March, 1863, Colonel Putnam was commissioned a 
Captain in the United States Army. He was a strict 
disciplinarian, but always so dignified, candid and just 
in his relations and intercourse .with his officers and men 
as ■ to secure and retain their unbounded respect and 
warmest affections. In his death the army lost one of 
its bravest and ablest commanders, and his regiment a 
gallant, honored and beloved Colonel. He united with 
the highest military talent a spotless character and many 
endearing qualities of head and heart. He was among 
the dearest sacrifices made by the government to put 
down a wicked rebellion. 

BRIGADIER GENERAL JOSEPH 0. ABBOTT. 

General Joseph C. Abbott is a son of Aaron Abbott, 
of Concord, Merrimack County, New Hampshire, and 
was born in that city on the 15th of July^ 1825. He 




^Qg ?-bTGeo-E Pen^® 



^A-t^^.^ ^ , Min/M-^ 



Col 7^ N.H Vols Brevet Brig. Geii'- U S-Vols. 



SEVENTH REGIMENT. 349 

attended the public schools of Concord, and subse- 
quently fitted for college under a private instructor and 
at Phillips Academy, Andover, Mass. Instead of enter- 
ing college, as he had designed, he read law with Hon. 
L. D. Stevens, the present Mayor of Concord, for a time, 
and afterward with Hon. David Cross, of Manchester, and 
Hon. Asa Fowler, of Concord. Having a very decided 
taste for literary pursuits, he was employed as editor of 
the Manchester American for six months from April, 
1851, and for the following six months was editor of the 
New Hampshire Statesman, published at Concord. On 
the 1st of May, 1852, he removed to Manchester, where 
he continued his residence until after the close of the 
war, and became permanently connected with the Amer- 
ican as its editor and proprietor until 1857, when he 
disposed of his interest in the paper and the printing 
establishment connected therewith. In May, 1859, 
General Abbott became one of the editors and proprie- 
tors of the Boston Atlas and Bee, and so continued until 
May, 1861. He was chairman of the committee that 
reported the resolutions in the Whig Presidential State 
Convention of New Hampshire in 1852, and was a 
member of the Whig State Central Committee two 
years, the last of which he was chairman. 

In July, 1855, General Abbott was appointed by 
the Governor and Council, Adjutant General of the 
State, which office he held until July, 1861, when he 
resigned. For several years he was an active and useful 
member of the New Hampshire Historical Society, and 
always took a lively interest in whatever related to the 
welfare of the State. In 1857, while Adjutant General — 
the State being without any effective military organi- 
zation, and feeling that in time of peace we should 
prepare for war, — he drafted an elaborate bill providing 
for a thorough organization of the volunteer militia of 
the State, and through his activity and influence secured 



350 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

its enactment into a law;, which is, with some slight 
modifications, the law of New Hampshire upon that 
subject still. 

On the 2d day of September, 1861, General Abbott 
received authority from the "War Department to raise 
a regiment of infantry in the State of IsTew Hampshire. 
About that time the State authorities were organizing 
four regiments of infantry, a battery, a company of 
sharpshooters, and a battalion of cavalry, making a 
very heavy draft upon its available men. It was with 
some difficulty that General Abbott could get the Gov- 
ernor and Council to extend to him such assistance as 
was absolutely necessary to secure the success of his 
undertaking, absorbed as they were in other matters 
more immediately pressing upon them; By his indom- 
itable perseverance, however, he succeeded "in securing 
the requisite number of men, and established the head- 
quarters of his regiment, which had been numbered 
the Seventh, at Manchester. Determined as he was 
that his should be the model regiment from the State, 
he desired that it should be commanded by a man with 
a thorough military education, who had seen service 
in the field : hence he asked only for the Lieut. Colonel- 
cy for himself, and nominated Lieut. Haldimand S. 
Putnam, a graduate of "West Point, a native of Cornish, 
in this State, and who had been in a responsible position 
on the stafl^ of General McDowell since the breakine 
out of the" rebellion, to the Governor, for Colonel. 
Lieut. Putnam was accordingly commissioned, and 
Gen. Abbott was commissioned Lieut. Colonel. Early 
in 1863 Colonel Putnam was placed in command of a 
brigade, and Lieut. Colonel Abbott commanded the 
Seventh Regiment. At the assault on Fort "Wagner, 
on the 18th, of July, 1863, while leading his brigade. 
Colonel Putnam was killed. The Seventh Regiment 
was in his brigade, under command of the Lieut. Col- 



SEVENTH REQIMENT. 351 

onel, and suffered a loss of two hundred and twelve 
officers and men, killed, wounded and missing. On the 
22d of July, soon after this disastrous engagement, 
Lieut. Colonel Abbott was promoted to Colonel of his 
regiment, and commanded it in most of its severe 
marches and bloody battles, until the summer of 1864, 
when he assumed command of a brigade ; after which 
he was nearly all of the time, until the close of the war, 
acting Brigadier General. He commanded a brigade 
at the capture of Fort Fisher, Ifprth Carolina, and was 
" appointed Brigadier General United States Volun- 
teers, by brevet, for gallant services " on that occasion, 
to date from January 15, 1865. General Abbott was 
mustered out of the United States service with his regi- 
ment, returned to New Hampshire with it, and was dis- 
charged in August, 1865. 

After the close of the war, General Abbott, in com- 
pany with some other gentlemen, purchased valuable 
timber lands in l^orth Carolina, and he removed to 
Wilmington and engaged actively in the land and lum- 
ber business. He was a member of the North Carolina 
Constitutional Convention, which assembled at Raleigh, 
in November, 1867, and took a leading part on commit- 
tees and in debates, showing an intimate knowledge of 
the political affairs of the country and a deep interest in 
the action of his adopted State in the condition in which 
the war had left it. In April, 1868, he was elected to 
the Legislature, and in June, 1868, General Abbott was 
elected United States Senator from North Carolina, for 
the term ending March 4, 1871, in which capacity he is 
now serving the country. 

As a political and general newspaper, writer General 
Abbott had few superiors in New England; as a politi- 
cian he was active, careful and conservative; as Adjutant 
General of the State, when the war first broke out, he 
exhibited true patriotism, the utmost energy and perse- 



352 THE aHEAT REBELLION. 

verance in raising and putting into the field, in the best 
possible condition for efficient service, the troops called 
for by the President; as a regimental and brigade com- 
mander in the field he was always cool, prudent, careM 
of his ' troops, gallant and fearless of consequences 
to himself, and scrupulously faithful in the discharge 
of every duty. As a true friend and high toned gentle- 
man he had no superiors in New Hampshire. 

LIEUT. COLONEL THOMAS ALBERT HENDERSON. 

Lieut. Colonel Henderson was a son of Oapt. Samuel 
H. Henderson, and was born at Dover, Strafford County, 
New Hampshire, December 1st, 1833. He completed 
the preparatory studies at Grilmanton Academy, and 
entered Bowdoin College in the fall of 1851, and gradu- 
ated with distinction, at the head of his class in 1855. 
For the three succeeding years he was principal of 
Franklin Academy in Dover, where he was a popular 
and successfal teacher. He read law in the office of 
Messrs. Woodman and Doe, of Dover, and finished his 
course at Harvard Law School in 1861, where he exhibit- 
ed marked ability as a scholar and debater. He won 
the highest prize for a legal essay, and received the 
degree of LL. B. Soon after his graduation he was 
admitted to the Suffolk Bar of Massachusetts, with 
every prospect of success and eminence in his profession 
before him. But the country was in a war with rebels, 
and believing that every good citizen owed his first duty 
to his government he determined to enter the army. 
"With this end in view he went to Norwich Vermont, 
where he remained several months, under military in- 
struction and drill, and then in November, 1861, ac- 
cepted the position of Adjutant of the Seventh Regi- 
ment, New Hampshire Volunteers. 

Upon the death of Major Smith, in August, 1862, on 



SEVENTH BEQIMENT. 353 

the urgent recommendation of Colonel Putnam, Adju- 
tant Henderson was commissioned Major. In the 
bloody assault upon Fort "Wagner, on the 18th of July, 
1863, Major Henderson acted as aid to Colonel Putnam, 
who was in command of a brigade, and was killed while 
leading a storming column, and in consequence of whose 
death Lieut. Colonel Abbott was promoted to Colonel, 
and Major Henderson to Lieut Colonel, on the 22d of 
the same month. He subsequently served on the staff 
of General Seymour, and was Provost Marshal of 
Florida during the campaign which resulted in the dis- 
astrous battle of Olustee. In the spring of 1864, the 
Seventh Regiment was transferred to Virginia, and 
Lieut. Colonel Henderson led his command in the battle 
of Drury's Bluff, where his skill and gallantry elicited 
the highest commendations from the commanding Gen- 
eral. He also commanded his regiment in the engage- 
ment at Deep Bottom, near Richmond, on the 16th of 
August, 1864, and received a mortal wound in the hip, 
which severed the principal artery, from which, despite 
all that surgical skill and attention could do, he died in 
a few hoursi His body was embalmed and sent home 
in charge of Chaplain Emerson, and was buried on the 
2d of September, in Pine Hill Cemetery, in the City of 
Dover, amid the mourning of a large circle of relatives 
and friends. Thus perished, while in the faithful dis- 
charge of duty another brave and talented officer and 
pure and earnest patriot. 

Lieut. Colonel Henderson was a man of very superior 
ability and fine attainments; of inflexible morality, and 
stainless purity of life. In the army he discharged 
every duty with fidelity and patriotic devotion, which 
with his uniform cheerfiilness and kindness made him a 
favorite with all, of whatever rank or degree. In his 
death, glorious though it was, the city of his birth, the 
State, his regiment and the nation met with a sad loss. 



354 THE aBEAT REBELLION. 



MAJOR DANIEL SMITH. 

Major Daniel Smith was a son of Winthrop Smith, 
Esq., of Durham, StraflEbrd County, New Hampshire. 
He was born at that place on the 27th of January, 1823. 
After attendance at the public schools of his native 
town he attended the academies at Grreenland and 
Pittsfield several terms. In early life he adopted the 
business of a land surveyor, and was eminently success- 
ful in it. In 1850 he was commissioned Lieutenant 
Colonel of the Twenty-fifth Eegiment New Hampshire 
Militia, and filled many positions of honor and trust 
in his native town. In 1854 he removed to Dover, and 
from 1865 to 1860, he was a Deputy Sheriff for Strafford 
County, City Marshal three years, and Representative 
from that city in the popular branch of the New Hamp- 
shire Legislature in 1860 and 1861. For his character 
as a man and many desirable qualities for the position 
he was appointed and commissioned Major of the 
Seventh Regiment on the 15th of October, 1861. He 
went with his regiment to New York City, thence^ to 
Tortugas Islands, where he served ably and acceptably 
as Provost Marshal, until the regiment moved to Flori- 
da, and thence to Beaufort, South Carolina, where he 
was seized with fever, when he came home in a very 
feeble state, and died on the 26th of August, 1862, 
leaving a widow and four children. As a citizen. Major 
Smith was highly respected, and discharged all official 
and public duties with intelligence and fidelity. While 
in the army his promptness, valor, kindness to the men 
and uniform cheerfulness won for him the confidence, 
respect and affection of his fellow officers and soldiers. 

The Seventh Regiment left Manchester on cars on the 
morning of the 14th of January, 1862. The Governor 



SEVENTH REGIMENT. 355 

and Council were present to bid them farewell, and 
Governor Berry made a short address to which the 
officers and men responded with three hearty cheers for 
New Hampshire and her GTovernor. On arrival at Il^ew 
York, the morning after its departure from Manchester, 
the regiment was ordered into quarters at White 
Street Barracks, where it passed a month of compar- 
ative inactivity, relieved only by an occasional dress 
parade or drill in one of the city squares. On the 13th 
of February orders were received to embark for the 
Dry Tortugas. Six companies, under command of Col. 
Putnam, embarked on the ship S. E.. Mallory, and the 
remaining four companies,"under Lieut. Colonel Abbott, 
on the barque Tycoon, and both sailed the same day. 
The latter vessel reached Tortugas after sixteen, and the 
former after twenty-one days' sail. The yellow fever 
broke out on the Tycoon, and two men of the Seventh 
Regiment fell victims to the disease before reaching 
their destination. 

Tortugas is situated on one of the Florida Keys, 
and at that time was the principal depot for the distri- 
bution of rations and munition of war to the forts, 
and military posts of the South. Colonel Putnam 
assumed command of the post, his regiment being the 
only troops at that point except a few regulars. The 
Seventh was stationed at Fort Jefferson, a well built 
fortification, nearly covering one of the small keys 
which rise above the coral reefs east of the Florida 
coast. Good quarters were arranged and other prepara- 
tions made for the comfort of officers and men. Here 
the duty consisted mainly of garrison and fatigue duty, 
and drill, both as infantry and heavy artillery, in which 
the men made good proficiency. 

On the 16th of June the regiment again embarked, 
and sailed for Port Royal, South Carolina, where it 
arrived on the 22d, and was ordered into camp at Beau- 



356 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

fort, where it remained, doing picket and guard duty, 
until the 15th of September, when it was ordered to St. 
Augustine, Florida, on light duty, that the men might 
recruit — two hundred having been lost to the regiment 
since leaving Manchester, by death and discharge, on 
account of disease produced by change of habits and 
climate and the long confinement in bad barracks in 
K'ew York, and on ship board. Major Smith was among 
those who died while the regiment was at Beaufort. 
While at St. Augustine the entire government of the 
town fell to the lot of the officers of the camp. The 
regiment remained there, except that detachments were 
occasionally sent on fruitless 'expeditions, until the 10th 
of May, 1863, when it was ordered to Fernandina, to 
relieve the Seventh Connecticut. After a month passed 
at that place, the regiment was ordered to Hilton Head, 
preparatory to an attempt to take Charleston. On the 
1st of June, 1863, the regiment had received about a 
hundred recruits since entering the service, notwith- 
standing which only five hundred and thirty-three men 
reported for duty. The whole number borne upon the 
rolls, at that date, out of an aggregate, including re- 
cruits, of over eleven hundred, was seven hundred and 
twenty-nine officers and men, making a loss of nearly 
four hundred, without having been under fire. 

On the 18th of June, the regiment left behind all 
superfluous baggage and camp equipage, and sailed from 
Hilton Head to Folly Island, the same night entered 
Stono Inlet in a heavy sea, by the aid of scows, 
efifected a landing about midnight,^ marched nearly 
to the northern end of the island, and went into camp 
in the range of the enemy's guns. From this time until 
the 10th of July the Seventh was constantly at work on 
the batteries which afterward covered the landing of 
Strong's forces, and carried consternation into the city 
of Charleston. 



EVENTE BEOIMENT. 357 



ASSAULT ON FORT WAGNER. 

On the morning of the 10th of July at daylight, the 
Union batteries erected on the northern point of Folly 
Island, opened upon the enemy's works on Morris Island, 
and soon. Strong's column having secured a landing, 
the remaining troops passed over. The Seventh New 
Hampshire passed over in the second column, and was 
at once moved to the northern part of Morris Island, 
relieved the force already there, threw out pickets, and 
when darkness came, threw up slight earth works. 
The first unsuccessful assault on Fort "Wagner took 
place on the morning of the 11th, and that evening 
moving up still nearer to the work, the Seventh com- 
menced what was afterward the second parallel in that 
siege. On the 18th of July the second assault on Fort 
Wagner was made. Colonel Putnam had been assigned 
to the command of the Second Brigade of Seymour's 
Division, and the command of his regiment devolved 
upon Lieut. Colonel Abbott. After a furious bombard- 
ment, which lasted during the entire day. Strong's 
brigade, just at twilig^it, advanced upon the works. It 
staggered back, leaving a few on and near the parapets ; 
Putnam's brigade, in which was the Seventh New 
Hampshire, followed close upon Strong's, in the face of 
a most deadly fire. The attempt to take the work was, 
in less than an hour, seen to be a failure, and such 
oflB.cers and men as had gained the works were with- 
drawn. In this attack Colonel Putnam, Capt. Brown, 
and Lieutenants Baker, Gate, Bennett and Bryant were 
killed. Capt. Leavitt was so severely wounded that he 
died within three days. Capt. House died the following 
October, Lieuts. Davis and Worcester died in a few days 
after the assault, while Lieuts. Ham and Taylor, both 
severely wounded, recovered and returned to duty. 



358 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

The loss to the regiment in this action was two hundred 
and twelve, killed, wounded and missing. The regi- 
ment remained on Morris Island, on duty in the trenches, 
on picket and on fatigue, five months, during which the 
weather was intensely warm. 

On the 20th of December the regiment left Morris 
Island, and the next day landed at St. Helena and 
reported to Colonel Joseph R. Hawley, into whose 
brigade it was incorporated. Here it remained until 
the 4th of Tebruary, 1864, during which time it received 
an accession of more than three hundred recruits. On 
the above date the regiment, with six hundred men for 
duty, embarked in the expedition of Gen. Seymour to 
Florida, landing at Jacksonville on the 8th. It then 
marched with the whole force, to Sanderson, a small 
station about fifty miles from Jacksonville. On the 12th 
the Seventh Regiment marched toward Lake City, to 
support a mounted regiment which had beeli previously 
sent out in that direction, and which was understood 
to be closely pressed by the enemy. After advancing 
about ten miles they fell in with the cavalry scouts of 
the enemy, who retired after a light skirmish. After 
completing the purposes for which it was sent out the 
regiment returned to Sanderson, the same night. The 
next day the whole force fell back to a place called Bar- 
ber's Plantation, where it remained until the 20th, when 
the whole of Seymour's force moved again toward Lake 
City. After marching about fourteen miles the enemy's 
skirmishers were met, and in two miles farther they 
were found in force near Olustee. A fierce battle en- 
sued, closing only with the approaching night, and in 
the defeat of the Union troops. The Seventh New 
Hampshire was in the advance, and was led within two 
hundred yards of the enemy's line, by flank and left in 
front. At that point they were brought into column 
and massed. The deployment had not commenced 



SEVENTH REGIMENT. 359 

before the enemy opened a very severe fire of artillery 
and musketry. The column faltered, and at last broke 
in a good deal of confusion. They were rallied again, 
however, and during the remainder of the battle did 
good service. The loss of the regiment in this engage- 
ment was in the aggregate two hundred and nine 
killed, wounded and missing. 

After the disastrous termination of the battle of 
Olustee, the whole force retreated to Jacksonville, where 
the Seventh remained until the 14th of April, almost 
constantly on duty, when it embarked for Gloucester 
Point, Va., which place it reached seven days afterward, 
disembarked and became a part of the army of the 
James, under Gen. Butler. It again embarked and 
landed at Bermuda Hundred on the 6th of May, and at 
once advanced into the country. A halt was made 
about seven miles from Bermuda Landing, at a place 
known as "Ware Bottom Church, and subsequently, as a 
part of the Tenth Army Corps, joined in the final 
advance on B;ichmond, which after long months of 
tenacious holding and heroic struggling, ended in the 
capture of that city and the downfall of the Rebellion. 

On the morning of the 9th of May the Tenth and 
Eighteenth Corps again advanced, reaching the Peters- 
burg and Richmond railroad, cutting it, and passing the 
northern fortifications of Petersburg. The regiment 
bivouacked for the night on the railroad, but in the 
morning the enemy pressed down from Drury's Bluff, 
and the brigade in which was the Seventh New Hamp- 
shire, was moved forward to repel them. On account 
of the sudden illness of Colonel Hawley, commanding 
the brigade, that command devolved upon Colonel 
Abbott of the Seventh, leaving Lieut. Colonel Hender- 
son in command of the regiment. Colonel Abbott sent 
the Seventh to the extreme left of the. line upon a small 
elevation, with instructions to hold it as long as possible. 



360 TEE QBEAT REBELLION. 

Very soon a brigade of the enemy advanced and attempt- 
ed to charge, but were met by a fire so steady and rapid 
that it recoiled again. Three times it attempted to 
charge, and each time was driven back, and the regi- 
ment held undisputed possession of the groimd until it 
was withdrawn with the rest of the brigade. For its 
conduct on that day the regiment was complimented 
upon the field by General Terry, commanding the 
division, and especial credit was awarded to Lieut. 
Colonel Henderson for his coolness and determination. 
At the close of this action the regiment returned to 
camp near "Ware Bottom Church. 

On the 12th the advance was made upon Drury's 
Bluff. The next day the Seventh supported the Third 
New Hampshire in the bloody assault made by them on 
the right of the enemy's works, and afterward skir- 
mished beyond the works up to other batteries. On the 
next day it advanced on the main works of the enemy, 
investing them, and was heavily engaged all day. The 
next day was Sunday, and the troops were allowed to 
rest. On Monday they again advanced until the whole 
line retired, when halting from time to time to repel 
attacks of the enemy, it fell back upon its camp at Ber- 
muda Hundred. 

From this time until the 9th of June, the regiment 
was on constant and severe duty, on what was then the 
disturbed and threatened front at Bermuda Hundred, 
and nearly every day under fire. On that day the regi- 
ment marched across the Appomattox, thence toward 
Petersburg, being a part of the force commanded by 
Major General Gillmore on that day. The skirmishing 
was light, though the artillery fire of the enemy was 
considerable; but the attempt to assault the works 
being abandoned, the regiment returned to camp at Ber- 
muda Hundred, that night. 



SEVENTH BEOIMENT. 361' 

On the 16tli of June, the Seventh under command of 
Lieut. Colonel Henderson, was engaged in a very spirit- 
ed fight in front of Bermuda Hundred, in which less 
than two brigades held in check irearly all day the main 
column of the enemy in its transit from the north to the 
south of the James. From this date followed picket 
and fatigue duty until August 15th, when the Seventh 
was in that force which crossed to Deep Bottom, first 
pressed upon ISTew Market Heights, and afterward 
assaulted and carried a part of the enemy^s works at 
Deep Run. The Seventh was in this assault, and was 
one of the last to retire from the field, which had been 
nearly won. Here Lieut. Colonel Henderson fell mor- 
tally wounded — an officer of the rarest qualities, admired 
and loved while living, and deeply mourned while dead. 

On the 21st the regiment again reached camp, and 
rested until the 24th, when it was moved across the 
Appomattox, into the intrenchments before Petersburg. 
There it remained until September 28th, in severe duty 
and under almost constant fire, when it was again a part 
of the column which advanced north of the James. On 
the 29th of September, the advance was made upon New 
Market Heights, which were carried, and the troops con- 
tinued to advance, first to Laurel Hill, then up the 
Darbytown Eoad, to within three miles of Richmond, 
thence Terry's division retiring, rested within intrench- 
ments at Laurel HiU. 

On the 1st of October, Terry's division again advanc- 
ed toward Richmond on the Darbytown Road, and the 
Seventh, which had been under command of Lieut. 
Colonel Rollins for several days, Colonel Abbott being 
again in command of the brigade, occupied the left of 
the line of skirmishers, which advanced, within two 
miles of the rebel capital, under a severe fire of artillery, 
and was one of the five regiments which had at that 
time, and ibr some months afterward, advanced nearest 



•362 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

to Richmond. Returning Again that night, the regiment 
rested until the 7th, when the enemy attacked furiously 
General Berney's right at Laurel Hill. In that attack 
the Seventh Regiment was in line, with no intrench- 
ments before thdm, and with the rest of the Second 
brigade of Terry's division, withstood nearly the whole 
of the heavy onset of the rebel division under General 
■Field, driving them back, after a severe fight, with 
heavy loss. The regiment rested until the 18th, 
when it was again engaged in the reconnoissance on the 
Darbytown Road, lasting during a day of sharp fighting. 
On the 27th it was in another reconnoissance on the 
Darbytown Road, lasting until night of the 28th, the 
fighting being almost entirely on the skirmish line, 
when it returned to camp. 

The Seventh IS'ew Hampshire was one of the regi- 
ments selected for the expedition to New York City, on 
the occasion of the Presidential election. On the 3d of 
November it broke camp, marched to Deep Bottom, 
and took transports for Fortress Monroe, where it 
arrived on the evening of the 4th. The whole force 
took transports and arrived at New York on the 7th, 
and the Seventh disembarked at Fort Richmond- On 
the morning of the 8th they were taken to the city, 
lying on board the army transport, in East River, near 
Fulton Ferry, three days, prepared for any emergency 
■jvhich might arise to require their services. Bnt they 
were not called upon, and on the 11th the Seventh 
returned to Fort Richmond, and on the 14th re-em- 
barked, and returned to their old camp ground, near 
Laurel Hill, on the 17th, where the men at once com- 
menced erecting winter quarters. In December one 
hundred and ninety-five men, having served their full 
term of enlistment, were mustered out, and one hundred 
and eleven recruits were received. These were most of 



SEVENTH REGIMENT. 363 

them substitutes, who had enlisted for the high bounties 
then being paid, and thirty-five of them deserted during 
the winter. 

On the 4th of January, 1865, the Seventh Eegiment 
marched to Bermuda Hundred, and there embarked on 
board transports and proceeded to Fortress Monroe, and 
there received sealed orders to be opened ofi" Cape 
Henry. The orders directed that the fleet should ren- 
dezvous twenty-five miles off Beaufort, N. C, and it was 
then known that the expedition was a second trial 
against Fort Fisher. On the morning of the 12th of 
January the monitors and ironclads made their way 
southward, followed by the frigates and gunboats, and 
they by thirty transports. The next morning the con- 
tinuous mounds of Fort Fisher appeared in view. The 
transports made the beach in a smooth sea, and General 
Terry's force disembarked. The movements of the 
troops have been given in the sketches of the Third and 
Fourth Regiments, and need not be repeated here. The 
brigade in which was the Seventh was not ordered up 
until five o'clock in the afternoon. It did not enter the 
fort until dark, and was not brought fairly into action 
until ten o'clock. At that hour, the regiment com- 
manded by Lieut. Colonel Rollins, led the assault on the 
sea angle of the fort, and half an hour later planted its 
colors on the bastion of the surrendered work. "While 
innumerable rockets from the fleet lighted up the sky 
to the eastward, cheer on cheer went up from the victo- 
rious troops within the fort. The Seventh, with one 
other regiment, formed in line southward of the fort, 
and pressed on toward battery Buchanan, which, with 
about a thousand prisoners, soon surrendered, and 
the whole of the immense fortifications, which had been 
considered impregnable, fell into the possession of the 
Union army. 

After the conquest of Fort Fisher the Seventh was 



364 TEE OBEAT REBELLION. 

occupied in strengthening the works in front of "Wil- 
mington, in making reconnoissances, and in picket duty, 
until the 19th of February, when tlie enemy commenced 
retiring aiid Terry to pursue. Reaching Wilmington 
on the 22d, the enemy, dispirited and disheartened, was 
still followed ten miles further, to a place called ]!^orth- 
east Ferry. The regiment, with the rest of its brigade, 
was then ordered back, to Wilmington, and assigned to 
the garrison of that place. Early in June it was sent 
to Goldsborough, where it remained until ordered to 
be discharged. The Regiment was mustered out of 
the United States service on the 20th of July. At 
Manchester they were received by the citizens with 
many demonstrations of respect and given a warm wel- 
come by a large concourse of people. At Concord an 
escort and refreshments awaited them, and Governor 
Smyth, on behalf of the State, addressed the regiment, 
thanking them for the good service they had performed 
and the honor they had won. Three hundred and 
twenty men and twenty-two officers returned. Of these 
less than one hundred were among those who left the 
State with the regiment in January, 1862. Of the orig- 
inal field and staff only one remained. The first 
colonel and the second lieutenant colonel had Mien in 
battle. 



EIGHTS REGIMENT. 365 



EIGHTH REGIMENT. 



The Eighth Regiment New Hampshire Volunteer 
Infantry was raised simultaneously with the Sixth and 
Seventh, and the men who enlisted to make up its 
quota were paid the same bounty, ten dollars, by the 
State as those in the five preceding ones had been paid. 
The rendezvous was established at Manchester. Hawkes 
Fearing, jr., was commissioned Colonel of this regiment 
on the 24th of September, 1861. The companies went 
into camp as fast as they were filled up, on the Eair 
Ground north of the City. The encampment was 
named " Camp Currier," in compliment to Hon. Moody 
Currier, of Manchester, one of the members of the 
Grovernor's Council, who had in various ways, officially 
and individually, shown his patriotism in aiding and 
encouraging enlistments for the war. The organization 
was completed and the regiment mustered into the 
United States service on the 23d of December, 1861. 
The following is a list of the field, staff and company 
officers of this regiment, while in the service, and the 
official record of each : 

FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS. 

Colonel — ^Hawkes Fearing, jr., of Manchester. 

Mustered out Jan. 18, 1865. 

Lieut, Colonels — Oliver W. Lull, of Milford. 

KiUed at Port Hudson May 27, 1863. 

George A. Flanders, of Sanbornton. 

Mustered out Jan. 18, 1865. 

Majors — Morrill B. Smith, of Concord. 

Resigned July 15, 1863. 

Thomas Connolly, of Manchester. 

Mustered out Jan. 18, 1865. 



366 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

Jolm K. Stokes, of Concord. 

Honorably discharged May 25, 1864. 

Adjutants — Orrin M. Head, of Exeter. 

Honorably discharged March 19, 1864. 

Thomas C. Prescott, of Strafford. 

Promoted to Captain May 25, 1864. 

James H. Marshall, of N'ashua. 

Transferred to Company C, Vet. Bat., 8th N. H. V., Jan. 2, 1865. 

Quartermasters — Charles A. Putney, of Manchester. 

Besigned August 20, 1862. 

Charles A. Bowen, of Concord. 

Transferred to Company B, Vet. Bat., 8th N. H. V., Jan. 2, 1865. 
Commissary — Tyler M. Shattuck. 

Mustered out Sept. 15, 1864. 

Surgeons — Samuel G-. Dearborn, of Milford. 

Besigned August 12, 1862. 

Andrew J Thompson, of Laconia. 

Besigned May 20, 1863. 

EUery C. Clarke, of Hollis. 

Honc^rably discharged Aug. 29, 1864. 

Andrew J. Thompson, of Laconia. 

Transferred to Veteran BattaUon, 8th N. H. V., Jan. 2, 1865. 

Ass't Surgeons — William B. Reynolds. 

Besigned Dec. 14, 1861. 

EUery C. Clarke, of Hollis. 

Promoted to Surgeon June 5, 1863. 

Charles B. Moulton, of Hopkinton. 

Died at New Orleans, Aug. 24, 1864. 

Hosea H. Smith, of Meredith. 

Honorably discharged Aug. 7, 1863. 

David p. Stowell, of Brookline. 

Honorably discharged June 24, 1864. 

Chaplain — ^Daniel P. Cilley, of Farmington. 

Transferred to Veteran Battalion, 8th N. H. V., Jan. 1, 1865. 

Sergeant Majors — Henry G. Cashing. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. Deo. 20, 1861. 

Luther T. Hosley, of Pepperell, Mass. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. Sept. 30, 1862. 
James M. Blanchard, of Milford. 

Discharged to accept pro. TJ. S. C. T. Sept 2, 1868. 

James H. Marshall, of Nashua. 

Be-enlisted Jan. 4, 1864. Promoted to Adjutant Nov. 13, 1864. 

Spencer Lane, of Sanbornton. 

Mustered out Jan. 18, 1865. 



EIQHTH REGIMENT. 367 

Quartermaster Sergeants — ^William H. Morrill, 

Beduced to ranks and assigned to Co. H, Sept. 26, 1863. 

Frank D. Woodbury, of Concord. 

Mustered out Jan. 18, 1865. 
Commissary Sergeants — ^Ira A. Brown. 

Discharged for disability July 8, 1862. 
Tyler M. Shattuck, of Nashua. 

E©-enlisted Jan. 4, 1864. Promoted to Second Lieut. March 1, 1864. 
Edward W. Pillsbury, of Nashua. 

Re-enlisted Jaji. 4, 1864. Mustered out Jan. 18, 1865. 

Hospital Stewards — ^Benjamin P. Emmons. 

Promoted to First Lieut. 1st La. Cav. Aug. 9, 1863. 

Henry N. Chapman, of Washington. 

Be-enlisted Jan. 4, 1864. Mustered out Jan. 18, 1866. 
Principal Musicians — ^William P. Munsey. 

Discharged at Carrollton, La. Deo. 3, 1862. 
Henry J. Durgin, of Laconia. 
Be-enlisted Jan. 4, 1864t Captured at Sabine Cross Boads, La., April 8, 
1864. Released Oct. 23, 1864. Mustered out Jan. 18, 1865. 

'Ezra D. Franklin, of Nashua. 

Reduced to ranks and assigned to Co. E, Dec. 18, 1862. 

James H. Marshall, of Nashua. 

Promoted to Sergeant Major Sept. 2, 1863. 
George H. Dunbar of Manchester. 

Be-enlisted Jan. 4, 1864. Mustered out Jan. 18, 1865. 

COMPANY OFFICERS. 

Co. A. — Captains — ^William M. Barrett, of Nashua. 

Discharged Oct. 24, 1868. 

Dana W. King, of Nashua. 

Transferred to Co. B, Veteran Battalion, 8th N. H. V., Jan. 2, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — John Q. A. Warren, of Nashua. 

Promoted to Captain April 14, 1862. 

Dana W. King, of Nashua. 

Promoted to Captain Dec. 16, 1868. 

Second Lieuts — ^Dana W. King, of Nashua. 

Promoted to First Lieut. April 14, 1862. 

James L. Hardy, of Amherst. 

Eesigned Dec. 31, 1862. 

Nestor Haines, of Nashua. 

Besigned Sept. 2, 1863. 

Nelson H. Peterson, of Nashua. 
Transferred to Co. A, Veteran Battalion, 8th N. H. V., Jan. 2, 1865. 



368 TEE aBEAT REBELLION. 

Co. B. — Captains — John Stanyan, of Milford. 

Resigned Oct. 16, 1863. 

George 8. Eayrs, of I^ashua. 

Mustered out Jan. 18, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Charles H. Camp, of Milford. 

Resigned Aug. 6, 1863. 

Daniel B. Newell, of Concord. 

Mustered out Jan. 18, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — George S. Eayrs, of ]S"ashua. 

Promoted to Captain Deo. 16, 1863. 

George S. Cohbs, of Exeter. 

Killed in action May 14, 1864. 

Co. C. — Captains — Thomas Connolly, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Major Dec. 16, 1863. 

William J. Gannon, of Manchester. 

Mustered out Jan. 18, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Cornelius Healy, jr., of Manchester. 

Promoted to Captain Oct. 28, 1862. 

"William J. Gannon, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Captain, Deo. 16 1863. 

Lawrence Foley, of Manchester. 

Mustered out Jan. 18, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — ^Wm. J. Gannon, of Manchester. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Oct. 28,-1862. 

William- Jones, of Manchester. 

Honorably discharged Dec. 28, 1863. 

Lawrence Foley, of Manchester. 

Promoted to First Lieut. June 22, 1864; 

Co. D. — ^Captains — .Joseph J. Ladd, of Manchester. 

Dismissed June 22, 1868. Disability fl\)m dismissal removed. Nov. 26. 
1864. • 

First Lieuts.— Wm. E. Hubbard, of Manchester. 

Dismissed Oct. 25, 1862. 
Henry G. Cushing, of Manchester. 

Resigned March 7, 1863. 

Irving G. WiUdns, of Nashua. 

Resigned Sept. 19, 1863. 

George E. Messer, of Greenfield. 

Honorably discharged Feb. 18, 1864. 

James Miles, of Manchester. 

Mustered out Jan. 18, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — H. G. Cushing, of Manchester. 
Promoted to First Lieut Oct. 80, 1862. 



EiaSTH REGIMENT. 369 

Irviiig G. Wilkins, of ITashua. 

Promoted to First Lieut. March 8, 1863. 

George E. Messer, of Greenfield. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Deo. 16, 1863. 

Newell 0. Carr, of Epping. 

Resigned May 26^, 1864. 

James Miles, of Manchester. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Sept. 1, 1864. 

Newell 0. Carr, of Epping. 

Promoted to First Lieut. April 1, 1864. 

Co. E. — Captains — Daniel M. Fisk, of Nashua. 

Resigned April 12, 1862. 

John Q. A. "Warren, of Nashua. 
I Killed at Georgia Landing, La., Oct. 27, 1862. 

George F. Richardson, of Moultonborough. 

Resigned Feb. 14, 1863. 

Nathan H. Pierce, of Manchester. 

Resigned Feb. 25, 1864. 

James R. Newell, of "Wolfeborough. 

Transferred ia Co. C, Veteran Battalion, 8th N. H. V., -Jan. 2, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Alonzo "W". Putney, of Nashua. 

Resigned Dec. 4, 1862. 

Nathan H. Pierce, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Captain Feb. 15, 1868. 

George W. Thompson, of Nashua. 

Killed at Port Hudson, La., May 24, 1863. 

William B. Emerson, of Nashua. 

Resigned Deo. 6, 1863. 

William H. Barnes, of Nashua. 

Mustered out Jan. 18, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — ^Nathan H, Pierce, of Manchester. 

Promoted to First Lieut Deo. 5, 1862. 

George W. Thompson, of Nashua. 

Promoted to First Lieut Feb. 15, 1863. 

William B. Emerson, of Nashua. 

Promoted to First Lieut June 1, 1863. 

Wilham H. Barnes, of Nashua. 

Promoted to First Lieut Dec. 16, 1863. 

James F. W. Fletcher, of Manchester. 
Transferred to Co. B, Veteran Battalion, 8th N. H. V., Jan. 2, 1865. 

Co. F. — Captains — George A. Flanders, of Sanbornton. 

Promoted to Lieut Colonel Dec. 16, 1863. 

Ezra B. Bell, of Laconia. 

Mustered out Jan. 18, 1866. 



870 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

First Lieuts. — Ezra B. Bell, of Laconia. 

Promoted to Captain Dec. 16, 1863. 
Joseph "Wallace, of Sanbornton. 

Killed at Fort Hudson, La., June, 14, 1863. 

William A. Beckford, of Salem. 

Wounded May 17, 1864. Mustered out Jan. 18, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — Cyrus S. Burpee, of Manchester. 

Resigned Dec. 81, 1862. 

Joseph Wallace, of Sanbornton 

Promoted to First Lieut. Dec. 16, 1863. 

William A. Beckford, of Salem., 

Promoted to First Lieut. Dec. 16, 1863. 

Charles E. Rowe, of Manchester. 

Mustered out Jan. 18, 1865. 

Co. Qi. — Captains — Henry H. Huse, of Barnstead. 

Honorably discharged Sept. 22, 1863. 

Lyman Locke, of Barrington. 

Honorably discharged Sept. 29, 1864. 

John H. Prescott, of Strafford. , 

Mustered out Jan. 18, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Jacob C. Main, of Rochester. 

Besigned March 3, 1863. 
Lyman Locke, of Barrington. 

Promoted to Captain Dee. 16, 1863. 

Thomas C. Prescott, of Strafford. 

Promoted to Adjutant April 1, 1864. 

John H. Prescott, of Strafford. 

Promoted to Captain Sept. 29, 1864. 

Elijah H. Blaisdell. 

Mustered out Jan. 18, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — ^Lyman Locke, of Barrington. 

Promoted to First Lieut. March 4, 1863. 

John F. Greenwood, of Barnstead. 

Killed April 13, 1863. 
Thomas C. Prescott, of Strafford. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Deo. 16, 1863. 
John H. Prescott, of Strafford. 

Promoted to First Lieut. April 1, 1864. 

John H. Marshall, of JS'ashua. 

Promoted to Adjutant Sept. 1, 1864. 

Co. H. — Captains— Aaron Q-. Estabrook, of Concord. 

Resigned Sept. 29, 1862. 

Benjamin F. Wells, of Lisbon. 

Resigned Deo. 81, 1862. 



SIGHTS REGIMENT. 371 

Jolm K. Stokes, of Concord. 

Promoted to Major Jan. 1, 1864. 

Thomas C. Prescott, of Strafford. 

Mustered out Jan. 18, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — ^Benjamin F. Wells, of Lisbon. 

Promoted to Captain Sept. 30, 1862. 

John K. Stokes, of Concord. 

Promoted to Captain Jan. 8, 1863. 

Luther P. Hosley, of ISTashua. 

Wounded May 27, 1863. KlUed at Port Hudson, La. June 14, 1863. 

James M. Langley, of Concord. 

Resigned Feb. 26, 1864. 

Edward K. Russ, of Lisbon. 

Honorably discharged Aug. 23, 1864. 

John C. French, of Concord. 

Mustered out Jan. 18, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — John K. Stokes, of Concord. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Sept. 30, 1862. 

Luther P. Hosley, of Ifashua. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Jan. 3, 1863. 

James M. Langley, of Concord. 

Promoted to First Lieut. June 15, 1863. 

John C. French, of Concord. 

Promoted to First Lieut., Aug. 23, 1864 

Co. L — Captains — Elphonzo G. Colby, of Wolfeborough. 

Discharged May 5, 1863. 

James H. Landers, of Concord. 
Transferred to Co. A, Veteran BattaUon, 8th N. H. V., Jan. 2, 1865. 

First Lieuts.^G. F. Eichardson, of Moultonboro'. 

Promoted to Captain Oct. 28, 1862. 

James H. Landers, of Concord. 

Promoted to Captain May 6, 1868. 

James R. iCIfewell, of Wolfeborough. 

Promoted to Captain June 22, 1864. 

George B. Johnson, of Farmington. 
Transferred to Co. A, Veteran Battalion, 8th N. H. V., Jan. 2, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — James H. Landers, of Concord. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Oct. 28, 1862. 

James R. N'ewell, of Wolfeborough. 

Promoted to First Lieut. May 6, 1863. 

George B. Johnson, of Farmingtoi;. 

Promoted to First Lieut. June 22, 1864. 

Co. K. — Captains — John Kelleher, of Manchester. 

EiUed at Labadieville, La., Oct. 27, 1862. 



372 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

Cornelius Healey, Jr., of Manchester. 

Honorably dieoharged Not. 3, 1864. 

First Lieuts. — Eobert Swiney, of Manchester. 

Committed suicide at Berwick City, La., April 9, 1863. 

Michael O'Grady, of Manchester. 

Honorably discharged March 14, 1864. 

Frank H. Connor. 

Mustered out Jan. 18, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — Michael O'Grady, of Manchester. 

Promoted to First Lieut. April 10, 1863. 

Patrick Doherty, of N"ashua. 

Honorably discharged March 7, 1864. 

John Nolan. 
Transferred to Co. C, Veteran Battalion, 8Ui N. H. V., Jan. 2, 1865. 



COLONEL HAWKES FEARING, JK. 

When the war of the rebellion broke out, in April, 
1861, Colonel Fearing was engaged in a considerable 
mercantile business at Manchester. Early in September, 
1861, he was tendered the command of the Eighth New 
Hampshire Regiment Volunteer Infantry, which he 
accepted, and was commissioned by the Governor on 
the 24th of that month. He organized his regiment at 
Manchester, took it to the field, and remained with it, 
either in immediate command of the regiment or the 
brigade of which it formed a part, during the whole 
three years term of its enlistment, except when detailed 
for temporary duty elsewhere. For some time previous 
and at the assault on Port Hudson, on the 27th of May, 
1863, Colonel Fearing was in comm.and of the brigade, 
on which occasion he exhibited coolness and bravery, 
and handled his command, which made a most gallant 
charge, with much skill. Had his brigade been sup- 
ported by other troops. Port Hudson would undoubtedly 
have fallen into the hands of the Union army at that 
time, instead of five or six weeks later. While the 
Eighth Regiment was at Natchez, Miss., during the fall 



EIGMTH REGIMENT. 373 

and winter of 1864, Colonel Fearing was on duty as 
chief of staff at General Brayman's headquarters. The 
term of service of the regiment expired on the 23d of 
December, 1864, shortly after which the original mem- 
bers, who had not re-enhsted, and a majority of the offi- 
cers, under the command of Colonel Fearing, returned 
to New Hampshire and were discharged. Colonel Fear- 
ing being mustered out on the 18th of January, 1865. 
He was an intelligent, active, faithful and popular officer, 
and enjoyed the respect and confidence of soldiers, and 
officers of every grade. After being discharged from 
the service Colonel Fearing returned to mercantile 
pursuits, and is interested in an establishment at Man- 
chester, and another in Massachusetts. 

LIEUT. COLONEL OLIVER WOODBURY LULL. 

Lieut. Colonel Lull, of the Eighth Regiment New 
Hampshire Volunteers, was another in the long list of 
noble and brave men from the State who fell while gal- 
lantly fighting to uphold the stars and stripes. He was 
born in Weare, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, 
on the 14th of January, 1826. He attended the public 
schools of his native town, at intervals, until eighteen 
years of age, when in 1844, he removed to Manchester, 
entered the high school in that city, and passed throifeh 
a thorough academic course of study. On accounf^f 
limited means he was obliged to abandon his most 
fond hopes of a collegiate course. Soon after leaving 
the Manchester high school he engaged for a time in 
teaching at Framingham, Mass., and subsequently com- 
menced reading law there, and completed the course in 
the office of Hon. David Cross, of Manchester. He was 
admitted to the bar of Hillsborough County, in May, 
1851, and soon after removed to Milford, where he 
established himself in the practice of his profession, and 



374 TEE aBEAT REBELLION. 

for his perseverance and industry was rewarded wifh a 
good business. 

Lieut. Colonel Lull had always had considerable taste 
for military duty, and manifested quite an interest in 
the Volunteer Militia of the State. He became a mem- 
ber of the Governor's Horse Guards, soon after its 
organization, and in January, 1861, was elected one of 
its Lieutenants. When the war broke out he aided in 
various ways the enlistment of men for the different 
regiments, and finally on the 1st of October, 1861, was 
commissioned Lieutenant Colonel of the Eighth Regi- 
ment, and at once entered upon the duty of recruiting 
and organizing that regiment, and went with it to the 
field. To speak particularly of his service while with 
that regiment, would be but a repetition of its history. 
He was always faithful to his duty and to his country, 
fearless of consequences to himself, cool and gallant in 
battle, and considerate of his men in field and camp, 
and commanded their highest respect. Li the actions of 
Bisland, Georgia Landing, Labadieville and Opelousas, 
he displayed great courage and heroism. 

At the time of the terrible assault upon the fortifica- 
tions of Port Hudson, on the 27th of May, 1863, Lieut. 
Colonel Lull was temporarily serving on the etaff of 
General Emery, but Colonel Fearing being in charge of 
aAtirigade, he voluntarily returned and took command 
of liis own men. The Eighth Regiment was among the 
forces at the head of the column when the advance was 
ordered, and with unequalled heroism the brave men 
charged directly upon the rebel forces. The conflict 
was desperate, but at length the enemy began to retreat 
with heavy loss. Lieut. Colonel Lull was constantly at 
the head of his command, and the fourth rebel line had 
just been passed, when in the act of cheering his men 
he fell pierced with a rebel rifle ball. The wound 
though very severe was not instantly fatal. He was 



EiaSTH BEGIMENT. 375 

immediately carried to the rear where after a few hours 
of intense suffering he expired. His body was carried 
to l^Tew Orleans and placed in a receiving tomb, and 
there remained until the following autumn, when it was 
brought home to Milford for burial. The funeral ser- 
vices were held !N'ovember 17th, in the church where 
the deceased was accustomed to worship, the building 
being filled to its utmost capacity with sorrowing kin- 
dred and friends. A detachment of the Governor's 
Horse G-uards was present and performed military hon- 
ors. Hon. David Cross, of Manchester, made an address, 
relating many incidents in the life of the deceased. 
The remains were deposited in the village cemetary, and 
his grave will long be remembered and honored as that 
of a man who nobly sacrificed his hfe for his country. 

While in the service Lieut. Colonel Lull discharged 
many important and responsible duties. For a time 
he served upon the staff of General "Weitzel, and after- 
ward for several months on that of General Emery, in 
both of which positions he won the highest respect and 
confidence of his superior officers. Before leaving the 
State he was presented by his friends with a valuable 
horse and sword as testimonials of their regard. In 
a letter to his. wife Lieut. Colonel Lull wrote: "I wish 
much to see you all, but I cannot leave my command. 
There is a great work before us, and I have no desire 
to go from the field until it is accomplished. If my 
life is spared till the rebellion is overcome, how much 
happier yoTi will be to think that in my humble way 
I was instrumental in restoring the country to peace 
and prosperity." On the morning preceding his death, 
before the battle opened, he wrote in his diary: "In 
one hour we commence the storming of Port Hudson. 
Many of us will not see another day. If I shall be one 
of that number, I will have done my duty." 



376 TBE GREAT REBELLION. 

The Eightli Regiment left Camp Currier, Manchester, 
on the 24th of January, 1862, in the midst of a driving 
snow storm, for Fort Independence, Boston Harbor. 
They were hospitably received and entertained at Fan- 
euil Hall, Boston, by the authorities of the city, and 
arrived at Fort Independence the next day. The regi- 
ment remained there three weeks, di'illing and waiting 
transportation, when on the 15th of February six com- 
panies. Tinder command of Col. Fearing, embarked on 
the ship E. WilS.er Farley, for Ship Island, Mississippi, 
the rendezvous of General Butler's expedition, and were 
followed a few days after by the four remaining com- 
panies, under command of Lieut. Colonel Lull, on the 
ship Eliza and Ella. After a long and tedious voyage 
the Farley arrived at Ship Island on the iSth, and the 
Eliza and Ella on the 27th of March. 

Forts Jackson and St. Philip having fallen before 
the irresistible valor of the navy, under the gallant 
Farragut, it remained for the army to follow up and 
complete the victory, by the occupation of New Orleans. 
The large part of Greneral Butler's force was conveyed 
from Ship Island up the Mississippi river ; the remain- 
der were to approach the city by way of Lake Ponchar- 
train. The Eighth New Hampshire were of this latter 
force, and four companies of the regiment were the 
first to seize and occupy Ports "Wood and Pike, by 
which the entrance to the Lake was defended — the 
rebels retreating precipitately on the approach of the 
expedition. 

The summer of 1862 was spent by the regiment at 
Camp Parapet, Louisiana, performing the usual routine 
of camp duty. The location was very malarious and 
unhealthy, from which the regiment suiffered severely, 
its ranks being decimated by disease and death. In 
October the Eighth formed a part of GTeneral Weitzel's 
expedition to expel the rebels from the occupation of the 



EIGHTS REGIMENT 377 

district of Lafourclie-^ne of the most productive and 
wealthy sections of Louisiana. The troops were con- 
veyed up the Mississippi on steamers, and landed at 
Donaldsonville, at the head of Bayou Lafourche. Prom 
this Point the Union troops moved down the Bayou, 
the Eighth with a squadron of cavalry and two pieces 
of artillery, marching on the right bank of the stream, 
the remainder of the troops upon the left. With the 
exception of a night skirmish between the pickets of 
the Eighth and a scouting party of rebel cavalry, no 
opposition was met vdth, until a little beyond the village 
of Labadieville, the enemy were discovered in force 
under General Morton, advantageously posted on both 
sides of the Bayou, sheltered by a hedge and ditch. 
Companies E and F were deployed as skirmishers, to 
ascertain the position of the enemy. Soon the sharp 
crack of their rifles told that they had discovered them, 
and that the action had commenced. Almost at the 
first fire the gallant Captain "Warren was killed — the 
first man in the regiment to fall in action. General 
Weitzel threw reinforcements across the Bayou, and the 
line advanced upon the enemy, the Eighth in the van. 
A short but sharp conflict ensued, ending in a charge 
which scattered the rebels in confusion, many being 
killed and wounded, and about three hundred taken 
prisoners, and one piece of artillery and a large number 
of small arms captured. Being ii^ the advance, and the 
first to charge the enemy's batteries, the Eighth suffiered 
more severely than all the other regiments engaged, 
losing sixteen killed and forty-six wounded — among the 
former being the brave Captain Killiher, who fell at the 
head of his men in the charge, l^o further opposition 
was encountered, the enemy having evacuated the 
Laroufche country and crossed over Berwick Bay into 
Attakapas. 

The next day but one after this affair, the Eighth; 



378 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

with a squadron of cavalry an(f a section of artillery, 
were sent under command of Colonel Fearing to take 
possession of ITew Orleans and Opelousas Railway. At 
Tigersville, Louisiana, the expedition captured an im- 
mense quantity of sugar which the rebels had been 
obliged to abandon upon the advance of the Union 
forces. On reconnoitering the railroad it was found 
that a bridge about one hundred and twenty feet long, 
across Bayou Boeuf, had been destroyed, while a mile 
of the track was covered with the ruins of engines and 
cars, burned to prevent their falling into the hands of 
the Union troops. Yankee skill and ingenuity were 
called into requisition, a detail was made from the regi- 
ment, the bridge rebuilt, the track relaid, an engine ptit 
in running order, and in one week trains were passing 
over the road, bringing stores and ammunition from 
New Orleans, ninety-three miles distant. 

During the winter of 1862-63 Lieut. Colonel Lull was 
detached as Provost Judge of the Parish of Lafourche, 
with Company B as provost guard. In the spring of 
1868 the regiment took part in General Banks' demon- 
stration against Port Hudson, at the termination of 
which the troops were rapidly conveyed to Brasher City, 
and the campaign through central Louisiana, which 
terminated in the investment and capture of Port Hud- 
son, commenced. The enemy, under General Dick 
Taylor, were first encountered in force, at Camp Bis- 
land, on Bayou Teche, intrenched behind breastworks, 
mounting heavy guns and aided by an iron-clad gunboat 
on the Bayou. On the 13th and 15th of April the 
battle of Camp Bisland was fought, resulting in the 
hasty retreat of the rebels, a large number of whom 
were killed and wounded ; the capture of ten pieces of 
artillery, two colors, and two thousand prisoners, and 
the destruction of the gunboat and three transports. 
Li this engagement the regiment was advanced within 



EIGETH REOIMENT. 379 

two hundred yards of the works, sheltered by a shallow 
ditch from the ceaseless storm of ball, grape and shell 
that filled the air, not only from the enemy's works in 
front, but from the Union batteries in the rear. So 
close was the fire that the bullets constantly struck the 
bayonets that projected above the edge of the ditch, 
and the lance that ornamented the flag-staff was carried 
away by a fragment of shell. The loss of the regiment in 
this encounter was only two killed and nine wounded — 
their close proximity to the enemy and the shelter of 
the ditch saving the men from the effects of the terribl§ 
fire. 

In the march of two hundred and thirty miles to 
Alexandria, Louisiana, the regiment suffered severely 
from the heat, dust, and want of water, but bore these 
hardships so cheerfully as to elicit frequent commenda- 
tions from the commanding general. When GTeneral 
Banks transferred his forces from B,ed River to the east 
bank of the Mississippi, preparatory to the attack on 
Port Hudson, the Eighth regiment was among the first 
to arrive at and invest that celebrated strong-hold. 

PORT HUDSON. 

Port Hudson proper is nierely a landing at the foot 
of the bluff, on the top of which were a few houses and 
a church. This bluff, like many others along the river, 
had been fortified with an extensive earthwork, encir- 
cling it from the river above to the river below; and 
for a quarter of a mile in front the heavy forest trees 
had been felled and made into an almost impenetrable 
ahatiis, or slashing, at the same time affording free range 
for the guns of the enemy. On the top of the bluff 
were the batteries commanding the river, to hold which 
scores of similar though not so extensive works had 
been erected all along from Vicksburg to Port Hudson, 



380 TBM GREAT REBELLION. 

and into the lattei- had been driven by the Union army 
iabout seven thousand rebels, under command of General 
Gardner. The capture of these and the works they 
held was the object aimed at. The number of the be- 
sieging army was said to be about twenty-two thousand 
effective men, with a hundred and and fifty pieces of 
artillery. The plan of attack was to open with the 
artillery at daylight, and for the infantry to advance at 
the same time and drive the outlying rebels inside their 
works, and enter them, if possible. The attacking 
party was formed in five lines, with distances of thirty 
paces, and the starting point a mile and a half from the 
works — the rebels lying in the woods between. 

Colonel Fearing was in command of the Second 
Brigade, ThiTd Division, Mneteenth Army Corps, and 
the Eighth Regiment formed a part of his brigade. 
Lieut. Colonel Lull had returned to the regiment from 
his long detail on staff duty. The night before the 
assault, made on th« 27th of May, 1863, the regiment 
bivouacked in the woods vrithin rifle-shot of the concealed 
but watchfal enemy. At dawn, after a hasiy breakfast, 
ammunition was distributed and all preparations for 
the assault made. The Eighth was posted on the right 
center, in the second line of battle. The order to 
advance was given, the enemy soon encountered, and 
fighting commenced. Shot and shell, grape and can- 
ister, crashed through the woods from the batteries 
on either side, and the rebels, from behind stumps and 
trees, replied to the volleys of musketry d«livered by 
the Union , advancing lines. The first line was soon 
broken and scattered by the withering fire of the enemy, 
and Colonel Fearing's brigade was ordered to charge. 
With a wild yell the line swept forward as fast as possi- 
ble over the bodies of the fallen — the Eighth New 
Hampshire and the Fourth Wisconsin moving shoulder 
to shoulder, driving the rebels through the woods, over 



EIGHTS MEGIMJSNT. 381 

their outer works, across the slashing and broken 
ground in front of the elaborate defenses of Port 
Hudson ; many of the men advancing into the ditch, 
planting the regimental colors on the very walls, and 
slaughtering the rebel gunners as they endeavored to 
work their pieces. Supports failed to come up, and 
the most advanced troops were compelled to withdraw 
to a more sheltered position, whence all day they poured 
sucb a deadly fire on the works that the guns were 
silenced, and all who attempted to near them were cut 
down the instant they appeared. It was a most gallant 
charge, though it did not accomplish all that was de- 
sired, and the success gained was achieved with fearful 
loss. The Eighth suffered more than any other regi- 
ment in the army; the Eourth Wisconsin, which fought 
next the Eighth in line, being next in order. The 
slaughter was terrific, much of the fighting being hand 
to hand. The Tenth Arkansas, rebel re^ment, which 
occupied the position in front of the Ifew Hampshire 
Eighth, was almost annihilated. Lieut Colonel Lull 
fell mortally wounded, by a minnie ball, early in the 
charge, while cheering on his men. His loss was deep- 
ly deplored. Captain Flanders and Lieutenants Jones 
and Langley were wounded. All of the color guard, 
excepting a single corporal, were killed or wounded; 
but the gallant survivor kept fast hold of his flag, and 
planted it triumphantly on the outer slope of the works, 
where it remained till night, riddled with grape, canister 
and bullets. The number taken into the fight was two 
hundred and ninety-eight, and of these one hundred 
and twenty-four were killed or wounded. 

From this time followed the usual events of a siege. 
A constant fire was kept up between the pickets, and 
many men were killed on both sides. Lieut. Geo. "W. 
Thompson was killed' while in the rifie pits, two days 



382 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

after the assault. The regimental return for May 
showed three hundred and seventeen men present for 
duty. 

On the 12th of June the following order was issued: 

Headquaktbks Third Division, ) 
Before Port Hudson, June 12th, 1863. j 

GrENBRAL ORDERS : Ifo. 64. 

COLUMN OF ATTACK. 

Eighth New Hampshire, Fourth Wisconsin, as skirmish- 
ers, intervals two paces. 
Five companies, Fourth Massachusetts and One Hun- 
dred and Tenth New York, with hand grenades. 
Four companies from Third Isrigade, with 400 cotton 

bags. 

Third Brigade. 

Second Brigade. 

First Brigade. 

50 Pioneers, to level parapet for artillery. 

Nims' Battery. 

1. The hand grenade men carry their pieces on their 
backs, and carry each one grenade. They march three 
paces in rear of their line of skirmishers. Having 
thrown their grenades they go on as skirmishers. 

2. The cotton-bag bearers march at the head of 
column, two hundred paces in rear of skirmishers. 
They fill the ditch to company front. Having deposited 
the bags, they take arms, and march at the head of 
column. 

3. The whole movement will be in quick time; no 
double-quick ; but in case the skirmishers encounter 
batteries which they can take by a double-quick ad- 
vance, they will move in that step. 

4. The skirmishers will clamber upon the parapet, 
followed by the hand grenades, which Avill be thrown 
over into the works as soon as the skirmishers are on 
the outer slope of- the parapets. The skirmishers will 
then rush in and gain ground forward, fighting, lying 
down, etc., according to circumstances. 

5. As soon as the column is within the works, each 
brigade will form line of battle, and lie down until the 



EIGHTH REGIMENT. 383 

artillery is brought up, unless circumstances should 
necessitate different orders. ' 

6. Each regimental commander will read these instruc- 
tions to his command, and will carefully explain to his 
own troops their particular duties. 

7. Each regiment, when forming in the night, will 
move silently, the officers speaking in a low tone. 

8. The men will carry two days' rations of hard bread 
in their haversacks, forty rounds of ammunition in their 
cartridge-boxes, and twenty rounds in their pockets. 
The knapsacks will be left in camp under a guard of 
convalescents. 

By command of Brigadier General Paine, 

Geoege "W". Dursin, a. a. a. g. 
Official: E. B. Bell, a^ a. a. g. 

The storming column was formed in accordance with 
the foregoing order, behind a hedge, about eight 
hundred yards from the works, and separated from them 
by an uneven open field. When within eighty yards of 
the works sheets of flame ran around the parapet, and 
the cannon poured in their double shotted charges of 
canister cutting through the ranks of the column like 
hail in a field of ripe wheat. Yet they advanced at a 
double-quick until the rebels, thinking the day lost, 
began to retire from their guns. Cheered by the hope 
of victory the ISem Hampshire Eighth and Fourth Wis- 
consin scaled the parapets, and had the supports come 
up promptly the place would have been captured. 
Many of these, however, were nine months men, and 
they halted, wavered, and finally fell back, leaving the 
handful of brave men to the mercy of the besieged, 
who now rallied and captured all who had entered the 
work, and poured a murderous fire into the remnant 
remaining in front, who escaped, if they escaped at all, 
by crawling back into the ditches and ravines. General 
Paine was shot through the leg early in the action, and 
could not be moved from the field till after dark. To 



384 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

his wound may perhaps in a great measure be attributed 
the failure of the attack. The Eighth was commanded 
by Captain Barrett. It was reported to have entered the 
fight with two hundred and seventeen men, and to have 
lost one hundred and twenty-two. Capt. J. M, Stanyan 
was wounded and taken prisoner. Lieuts. Wallace, 
Hosley and Newell were missing. Captain Elanders 
and Lieuts. Gannon, Locke, Prescott, and O'Grady, 
were all wounded. Wo flag of truce was allowed by 
the rebels for three days, and nothing could be known 
of the condition of the wounded lying between the 
lines. The rebels refused to allow the Union stretcher- 
bearers to go upon tlie field, and scores of poor fellows 
perished of thirst, under the scorching sun, who might 
have been saved. On the 17th the stench from the 
putrefying corpses had become so intolerable to the 
enemy that they raised a white flag, and proposed to 
pick up the'Union dead and wounded and deliver them 
at a given point. This was accepted, and one hundred 
and thirteen dead and one wounded were brought in, 
most of them so discolored as to be unrecognizable. 

The siege was continued, the Union works being 
constantly advanced, until the 4th of July, when Vicks- 
burg surrendered. Dispatches were received from 
General Grant, announcing the grand result at the 
headquarters of General Banks, on the morning of the 
7th, and soon the joyful news was communicated to 
every regiment, battalion and detachment in the army. 
General Banks issued a general order, directing a salute 
of one hundred shotted guns to be fired from each 
battery, and ordering all the regimental bands to as- 
semble at his headquarters at noon. The salutes were 
fired and two hundred instruments performed some of 
our most stirring melodies, and there were other demon- 
strations of joy, which the rebels at Port Hudson did 
not understand. They soon, however, learned of the 



EIGHTH REGIMENT. 385 

surrender of Vieksburg through the Union troops, 
doubting the truth of which General Gardner the next 
day sent a flag of truce to ascertain if the report was 
indeed true. General Banks returned official copies 
of General Grant's dispatches, upon receipt of which 
the rebel commander, Gardner, again sent out to know 
upon what terms General Banks would receive his 
surrender. Terms were arranged and Port Hudson 
was surrendered on the 9th of July. The scenes and 
ceremonies attending the surrender and transfer of the 
second great strategic point on our vast continental 
river to its rightful owners, were most imposing. From 
morning till high noon was seen the grand and tri- 
umphal march of the Union victorious columns, treading 
with joyous steps the paths to that famous place. In 
the column the !New Hampshire Eighth was assigned 
to a position of honor, in recognition of the ^gallant 
service it had performed in the siege, and was further 
complimented by assignment to a camping ground on 
that high bluff midway of the river front, and directly 
under the stars and stripes it had done so much to 
defend. The rebel General Gardner surrendered his 
sword to General Andrews; unwilling hands lowered 
the banner of secession ; a squad Of sailors from the 
fleet drew up to the same point the glorious stars and 
stripes; salutes and cheers were given with a will, 
and the Mississippi river, from its mouth to its source, 
was free ! 

On the 22d of August the Eighth marched back to 
Baton Rouge. On the way two of the men were gob- 
bled up by the rebel cavalry, they having stopped to 
bring along a disabled wagon. The regiment remained 
in camp north of the capital city of Louisiana, where 
it continued until the 2d of September, when it embarked 
on transports and sailed with an expedition to Sabine 
Pass, Texas, at the mouth of the Sabine river. The pass 



386 TSE QBE AT REBELLION. 

was defended by heavy guns, by which was disabled the 
two gunboats Sachem and Clifton, and the rebels made 
prisoners of all on board, numbering about one hundred 
and eighty men. After some farther mishaps the object 
of the expedition was abandoned and it returned to New 
Orleans. About the middle of September the Eighth 
returned to Camp Bisland— the old battle ground of the 
13th of April. 

Colonel Fearing was absent with two or three officers 
for the purpose of bringing on conscripts, and Captain 
Flanders, who had been promoted to Lieut. Colonel, 
was in command of the regiment. Early in October 
they moved to Opelousas ; and in December were 
ordered to Franklin, where the regiment was mounted 
and the name of the organization changed to the Second 
New Hampshire Cavalry. They were armed with 
sabers, carbines and revolvers, and drilled in the oi;di- 
nary cavalry tactics. During the month Colonel Fear- 
ing returned with upward of three hundred and fifty 
recruits for the regiment. On the 4th of January, 1864, 
two hundred and nineteen of the old men re-enlisted, 
and without th« usual thirty days' furlough they were 
ordered at once into the field. 

At the commencement of th^ Red River campaign, 
the Eighth, with the rest of the cavalry division — about 
fifteen thousand men — marched fi'om New Orleans to 
Alexandria — three hundred and eighty miles — where 
they joined General A. J. Smith's forces, who had 
ascended the river. The Second New Hampshire Cav- 
alry, as the regiment was now designated, was brigaded 
with five regiments under Colonel Davis. From Alexan- 
dria the cavalry pushed the enemy's rear-guard closely, 
having quite a skirmish at Natchitoches, where the regi- 
ment charged through the streets of the town, killing 
and caj)turing a number of the enemy. 



EIGHTS BE&IMENT. 387 

On the 8th of April the cavalry came unexpectedly 
upon the enemy at Sahine Cross ;Roads, where the 
Second New Hampshire Cavalry at once charged on a 
brigade and put them to flight. This movement un- 
naasked two divisions of rebel infantry, but they, ap- 
parently bewildered by the very audacity of the move- 
ment, allowed the regiment to escape unmolested. lu 
the action which followed, a part of the regiment was 
dismounted and deployed as skirmishers in front of the 
infantry. These were nearly all captured, numbering 
forty-seven men — together with Captain Dana "W". King, 
whose horse was shot in the charge — and were carried 
to the famous prison pen at Tyler, Texas, where they 
suffered the common lot of Union prisoners of war for 
several months. A disastrous battle followed, after 
which the regiment covered the retreat of the infantry, 
almost continually skirmishing with the enemy. On the 
march from Alexandria to Morganzia, the regiment saw 
its hardest experience. Skirmishing by day and march- 
ing by night to reach the army whose retreat it was 
following, without sleep or rest, both men and horses 
were well nigh exhausted. In one of the numerous 
skirmishes with the rebels, Lieut. Cobbs, of Company B, 
was captured, dismounted and disarmed ; but before he 
dould be taken to the rear, the regiment made a counter 
charge to recapture him. Seeing that he was about to 
be lost to them, a rebel officer shot him with his own 
pistol. His body fell into the hands of his regiment, 
and was buried on the banks of the Red river. 

At Yellow Bayou, on the 17th of May, the brigade 
was attacked by about six thousand of the enemy, and 
were nearly surrounded. They succeeded in cutting 
their way out by presenting a bold front, and by un- 
daunted courage. At Bayou de Glace, where they 
stopped to build a bridge over the Atchafalaya river, 
they were fiercely attacked by the enemy, under General 



388 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

Dick Taylor. The enemy were resolutely met and quick- 
ly routed, losing two hundred and fifty prisoners and two 
pi«ces of artillery, and did not afterward disturb the 
Union army on its march. During the whole of the 
campaign the Second N'ew Hampshire Cavalry lost 
ninety-six men killed, wounded and missing. Lieuts. 
Bickford, Newhall and Haskins were wounded in the 
last two fights. 

After arriving at Morganzia the regiment was ordered 
to ]!^ew Orleans, to proceed on its, veteran furlough. 
The re-enlisted men started up the Mississippi on the 
11th, and arrived at Concord on the 23d of July, where 
they met with a warm reception. They remained at 
home until the 29th of August, when they started for 
Louisiana, and joined their comrades at Camp Parapet, 
and were soon ordered to N"atchez, Miss., where they 
remained during the fall, doing picket and garrison 
duty. While stationed here a detachment of the regi- 
ment, under command of Major Connolly, participated 
in an expedition into Louisiana, capturing large quanti- 
ties of stores and provisions, and bringing in many 
horses and mules. 

Late in the fall the regiment was ordered into Fort 
McPherson — an extensive earth-work, commanding the 
city and its approaches. Here the men constructed 
comfortable winter quarters, cook-houses, etc., out of 
the debris of houses pulled down to give range to the 
guns^ and the regiment had time for putting their 
clothing and equipments in good order, and soon pre- 
sented so fine an appearance as to elicit the high com- 
mendations of inspecting officers. 

The time of service of the regiment expired on the 
23d of December, 1864, shortly after which the non- 
veterans, and a majority of the officers, under command 
of Colonel Fearing, were ordered home to be mustered 
out of service. They reached Concord early in January, 



EIGHTH REGIMENT. 389 

1865, were handsomely welcomed by the State author- 
ities, mustered out, paid, and the regimental organizar 
lion of the Eighth New Hampshire Volunteers ceased 
to exist. 



VETERAN BATTALION. 



At the expiration of the original term of the Eighth 
Regiment, there remained in service three hundred 
and five veteran volunteers, and recruits joined sub- 
sequent to the original muster-in of the regiment. 
These, under regulation of the "War Department, were 
organized into three companies of the maximum 
strength, and designated -the "Veteran Battalion, 
Eighth New Hampshire Volunteers." Though there 
was no regimental organization, Surgeon Andrew J. 
Thompson was retained in the service to attend to the 
health of the battalion. The command dates its organ- 
ization from January 1st, 1865. Captain Landers 
assumed command of. the battalion by virtue of su- 
periority of rank. ^ 

On the 9th of January the battalion was ordered 
to Vidalia, on the Louisiana shore, directly opposite 
Natchez. The post was commanded by Brigadier General 
M. Brayman — ^Lieut. Marshall, of the Veteran Battalion, 
being his adjutant general. The defenses of Vidalia 
consisted of a square redoubt, with bastions at the 
inland angles, inclosing the court house and jail of the 
parish, which were used for officers' quarters and for 
the storage of quartermaster's and ordnance stores. 
The work mounted four ten pounder rifles and two 
howitzers, and was garrisoned by the Veteran Battalion, 



390 THE OBEAT REBELLION. 

a squadron of the New Jersey Cavalry, and a section 
of artillery. All the territory in federal possession was 
included in a picket line two miles in length, curving 
in a semi-circle from the river to the river again. In 
the stream, a little above the fort, lay the huge iron-clad 
Benton, whose hundred-pounders and eleven-inch Dahl- 
grens commanded a wide sweep of country in rear of 
the post. The nearest post of the enemy was at Har- 
risonburg, about forty miles distant, with an outpost at 
Trinity, twenty-five miles from Vidalia. The country 
between was a sort of " debatable ground," being raided 
over by either party in turn. The Union forces would 
sweep the rebel plantations along Black river of all 
the horses, mules and corn that could be found, while 
small parties of the enemy would make midnight forays 
upon the government lessees, most of whom were 
northern men, who trusting to their contiguity to the 
Federal Unes for protection, had engaged in cotton- 
planting around Vidalia. The rebel jay-hawkers would 
plunder them and shoot them down remorselessly. On 
one occasion a party of sixty of these rebel marauders 
dashed into a plantation within plain sight of the post, 
upon which was a picket of a sergeant and six men of 
the Veteran Battalion. The sergeant drew up his little 
force in line of battle across the road, and as the enemy 
came charging down, received them with a volley from 
his six rifles, which sent them precipitately to the "right 
about." Plunder and not fighting being their object, 
they retreated at the slightest show of resistance. 
These raids became quite frequent during the month 
of February, but the enemy never ventured to attack 
the post. 

It being ascertained that most of the raiding and 
plundering about Vidalia was done by deserters from 
the rebel army east of the Mississippi, who were living 
at their homes along Black river, and subsisting upon 



EIGHTS REGIMENT. 391 

the spoils of their guerilla warfare, General Brayman 
decided to send out a party to kill or capture them if 
possible ; or at any rate to seize their horses and mules, 
which would deprive them of the means of carrying on 
their depredations. By his order, on the 4th of Febru- 
ary, Captain James R. ISTewell, of Company C, with a 
party of fifteen men, mounted for the occasion, started 
for Black river. They were accompanied by four scouts, 
Union men of the south, who, hunted like wild beasts, 
their crops and buildings burned, and their wives and 
children turned houseless into the woods to starve, had 
entered the Union service. These scouts were clad in 
" rebel gray," armed to the teeth ; and, being rendered 
desperate by their grievances, had sworn never to be 
taken alive, all preparations having been made, the party 
started from Vidalia before daylight, and striking across 
the fields, the little cavalcade entered the.wooded swamp 
which skirts the strip of cultivated land along the river, 
guided only by the compass, and marks upon trees — 
unnoticeable by ordinary observers, but easily seen and 
recognized by the keen-eyed scouts. The party at last 
reached Black river where it empties into Red river, 
and commenced operations, and, swooping down upon 
the haunts of the guerillas, captured their horses and 
horse equipments ; but the guerillas themselves escaped 
by plunging into the swamp. Two or three of these 
rebel rendezvous were broken up in as many days, when 
one of the scouts, who, in his rebel gray had ridden 
out toward Harrisonburg, returned with the intelligence 
that their movements were known to the rebel com- 
mander, and that a force of about three hundred rebel 
cavalry were in hot pursuit. So, leaving Blaick river, 
Captain Newell struck into the swamp once more, driv- 
ing before the party the captured stock, and heading for 
Vidalia. A furious rain-storm set in, and soon the 
rising water warned them that an overflow of the Mis- 



392 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

sissippi was at hand, and that their only safely lay in 
reaching higher ground. The water rose rapidly until 
it reached the men's styrrups; the enemy behind, the 
flood for miles before and around them, they splashed 
on in silence through the gloomy forest, always dark in 
the sunniest days, now doubly so that the sky was over- 
cast and the air filled with sheets of driving rain. It 
was at this time that the scouts' knowledge of the coun- 
try saved the whole party. Guided by them they 
arrived at nightfall on a ridge of land in the midst of 
the swamps, ten miles from ^ny clearing or human 
habitation. Here they bivouacked, and passed a most 
miserable and uncomfortable night, in a pelting rain, 
without shelter, and almost entirely destitute of food 
for man or horse. The water continued to rise through 
the next day, but toward night the rain slackened, and 
Captain Newell, with one of the scouts, set out to dis- 
cover some means of escape from the watery blockade. 
They pushed out into the water, which grew deeper and 
deeper until the horses had to swim. Finally the scout's 
horse gave out, sank and was drowned, while he took 
to a log. Captain K'ewell's horse began to show signs 
of failing strength, when he threw off his saber, pistol, 
boots and overcoat, and plunging into the water seized 
his horse's mane, and after an hour's swimming the 
noble animal landed him again upon the ridge, when he 
fell insensible to the ground — ^the blood rushing from 
his nostrils from the violence of his exertions. He was 
taken to the fire and resuscitated. The darkness 
rendered a search for the scout that night impracticable. 
At daylight next morning Captain Newell and two men 
started out and found him a mile and a half from the 
ridge, chnging to the log almost lifeless, from cold and 
exhaustion. He was rescued and carried to the ridge, 
where he was taken care of and restored. The men, 
being upon the verge of starvation, killed a horse and a 



EiaSTH REGIMENT. 393 

mule, and feasted upon steaks and cutlets, seasoned with 
gunpowder in lieu of salt. After another day passed 
on the ridge, the swamp being still impassable, it was 
determined to make a bold push for the Union lines by 
the nearest road, which after some sharp practice and 
amusing adventures they reached on the 10th, having 
been absent six days. 

On the 6th of March the battalion returned to 
Natchez, where they were engaged in provost duty. 
They soon became the favorites of the commanding 
general, J. "W. Davidson, an old regular army officer, 
through whose exertions they were fitted out with new 
uniforms, shoulder scales, etc., in which the battalion 
presented quite a hohday appearance. During the 
month of March a detachment from the battalion pro- 
ceeded by steamboat to Gaines' Landing, about twenty- 
five miles up the river from whence they marched into 
the interior and captured a rebel depot of supplies and 
a few prisoners. Lieut. Greorge B. Johnson was detailed 
as assistant provost marshal of Natchez, and Lieut. 
John J. Nolan to command the military prison. 

On the reception of the news of the surrender of 
Lee's army and the capture of Richmond, a general 
illumination of the city and a torch-light procession 
were ordered by the provost marshal. Both were grand, 
and the right of the column was assigned to the Veteran 
Battalion. Li May Surgeon A. J. Thompson was as- 
signed to duty as surgeon in charge of the district, 
which position he occupied until the command was 
mustered out. Captain James H. Landers was detached 
as assistant commissary of musters, leaving Captain 
James R. Newell in command of the battalion. On 
the 5th of June Lieut. Charles A. Bowen, of Company 
B, formerly regimental quartermaster of the old organ- 
ization, was detached as post quartermaster at Natchez, 



394 TSE ORE AT REBELLION. 

having charge of several million dollars worth of prop- 
erty of every description, from a steamboat to a mule 
shoe. About this time over ninety enlisted men of the 
battalion were employed upon various kinds of detached 
service, as clerks, orderlies, &c., a fact which speaks 
well for the trustworthiness of the rank and file. On 
the 12th of August Lieut. James H. Marshall was de- 
tached as Acting Assistant Adjutant General upon the 
staff of Major General H. "W. Slocum, commanding the 
Department of Mississippi, where he served until the 
battalion was mustered out. 

The battalion was ordered to Vicksburg for that 
purpose, and the men were mustered out of the United 
tates service on the 29th of October, left for N'ew Hamp- 
shire, under command of Capt. Dana "W. King, and 
arrived at Concord on the evening of the 6th of iN^ovem- 
ber, where they were received by Adjutant General 
I^att Head, and Governor Frederick Smyth, who ad- 
dressed them in a few appropriate words, tendered the 
thanks of the State, and invited them to a hot supper 
at the hotels. On Friday, the 9th of November, the 
battalion was paid off and discharged. One hundred 
and seventy-nine enlisted men returned, the last repre- 
sentatives of over one thousand seven hundred men 
who had served in the Eighth Kegiment. Captains 
Newell and Landers, Surgeon Thompson, and Lieuts. 
Bowen and Fletcher, with about twenty-five enlisted 
men, were left at the South, preferring to be discharged 
there to returning with the battalion. The officers who 
returned with the command were Captain Dana W. 
King, commanding the battalion ; and Lieutenants 
George B. Johnson, James H. Marshall and Nelson H. 
Peterson. 

As a recognition of their services the officers of the 
battalion were presented with brevet commissions by 
the Governor, making the roster as follows : 



EIQETE REGIMENT. 395 

'^"1^'^el, James H. Landers; 

Colonel, Dana W. King ; 

James R. Newell ; 

)n, Andrew J. Thompson; 
Company A — Captain, George B. Johnson ; 

First Lieut. Nelson H. Peterson ; 
Company B — Captain, Charles A. Bowen ; 

First Lieut. James F. W. Fletcher ; 
Company C — Captain, James H. Marshall ; 

First Lieut. James L. "Wheeler. 

The Eighth Eegiment was actively engaged in the 
following battles : 

Georgia Landing, October ^7, 1862. 

Camp Bisland, April 12 and 13, 1863. 
Port Hudson, May 27 and June 14, 1863. 

Sabine Cross Roads, April 8, 1864. 

Cane River, April 23, 1864. 

Moreauville, May 17, 1864. 

Yellow Bayou, May 18, 1864. 

Besides these the regiment was engaged in fifty-three 
distinct skirmishes, some of which, previous to the war 
of the rebellion, would have been considered sanguinary 
battles, and in all of them was distinguished for coolness 
and bravery. 



396 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 



NIKTH REGIMENT. 



After the Eighth Regiment had been sent to the field, 
recruiting in ^Rew Hampshire ceased, and by order of 
the "War Department all recruiting offices for volunteers 
were closed and their furniture sold. In May, 1862, an 
order was received from the "War Department, request- 
ing iN'ew Hampshire to furnish an additional regiment 
of infantry. A bounty of twenty dollars was offered — 
which was subsequently increased to fifty dollars — ^by 
the State to each person who might enlist in any new 
regiment, and sixty dollars to those who would enlist 
in either of the regiments then in the service. The men 
rendezvoused at Concord, and during the month of July 
a large portion of the regiment was mustered into the 
United States service. The organization was finally 
completed on the 23d, and left the State for the seat of 
war on the 25th of August, under command of Colonel 
Enoch Q. Fellows, who had previously resigned his com- 
mission in the Third Regiment. The following were 
the field, staff and company officers, with their official 
record, during the whole term of the service of the 
regiment : 

FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS. 

Colonels — ^Enoch Q. Fellows, of Sandwicn. 

Resigned Nov. 21, 1862. 
Herbert B. Titus, of Chesterfield. 

Discharged Sept. 27, 1864. Reinstated by Special Order No. 377, War 
Department, Not. 1, 1864. Mustered out June 10, 1865. 

Lieut. Colonels — Josiah Stevens, Jr., of Concord. 

Resigned June 14, 1862. 

Herbert B. Titus, of Chesterfield. 

Promoted to Colonel Nov. 22, 1862. 



NINTH BEOIMENT. 397 

John W. Babbitt, of Keene. 
Wounded May 12, 1864. Discharged on account of wounds Deo. 5, 1864. 

Majors— Herbert B. Titus, of Chesterfield. 

Promoted to Lieut. Colonel Aug. 26, 1862. 

George "W. Everett, of N'ew London. 

Died August 27, 1863. 
George H. Chandler, of Concord. 

Wounded May 12, 1864. Mustered out June 10, 1865. . 

Adjutants — ^William N. Cook, of Wakefield. 

Died August 9, 1862. 
George H. Chandler, of Concord. 

Promoted to Major Sept. 1, 1863. 
"William I. Brown, of Fisherville. 

Promoted to Major 18th N. H. Vols., Oct. 13, 1864. 

Oscar D. Robinson, of Plainfield. 

Promoted to Captain May 1, 1865. 

Quartermasters — Carlton B. Hutchinson, of Lisbon. 

Besigned Not. 12, 1862. 

William Pitt Moses, of Great Tails. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 

Surgeons — ^William A. Webster, of Manchester. 

Honorably discharged Jan. 6, 1866. 

Francis IST. Gibson, of Alstead. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 

Ass't Surgeons — John S. Emerson, of Sandwich. 

Promoted to Surgeon 18th Eegt. N. H. Vols., March 22, 1865. 

Francis IN". Gibson, of Alstead. 

Promoted to Surgeon Jan. 18, 1865. 

Chaplain — Edward M. Gushee, of Dover. 

Resigned Oct. 20, 1863. 

Sergeant Majors — ^Edwin Greene, of Concord. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. Sept 29, 1862. 

George P. Sylvester, of Gilmanton. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. March 1, 1863. 

Franklin H. Foster, of Exeter. 

Captured near Petersburg, Va., July 30, 1864. Died of disease at Salis- 
bury, N. C, Dec. 14, 1864. 

N'ewell T. Button, of Claremont. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 

Quartermaster Sergeants — James B. Perry, of Nashua. 

Discharged for disability Nov. 26, 1862. 

S. Henrv Sprague, of Keene. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Nov. 12, 1862. 



THE ajREAT REBELLION. 
Charles P. Hill, of Somersworth. 

Discharged for disability at Concord, Sept. 18, 1868. 

Charles E. Kugg. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 

Commissary Sergeants — H. M. Hanson, of Great Falls. - 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 

Hospital Stewards — ^Aaron W. Shepard, of Nashua. 

Promoted to Ass't Surgeon 18th N. H. Vols., Nov. 10, 1864. 

Sylvester J. Hill, of Manchester. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 

Principal Musicians — Sylvanus Adams, of Milford. 

Mustered out Nov. 25, 1862. 

Alden B. Bennett, of Milford. 

Mustered out Nov. 25, 1862. 

COMPANY OFEICBRS. 

Co. A. — Captains — ^L. H. Pillsbury, of Londonderry. 

Resigned Aug. 7, 1863. 

Ludo B. Little, of Lyman. 

Wounded severely July 2, 1864. Honorably discharged Oct. 24, 1864. 

Ekst Lieuts. — ^Wm. S. Pillsbury, of Londonderry. 

Resigned Oct. 9. 1862. 
Oliver P. Newcomb, of Orford. 

Resigned Jan. 11, 1863. 
Lndo B. Little, of Orford. 

Promoted to Captain Jan. 1, 1864. 
George "W. Emery, of Dover. 

Killed near Poplar Grove Church, Va., Sept. 30, 1864. 

Charles J. Simons, of Epping. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 
Second Lieuts. — Oliver P. IS'ewcomb, of Orford. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Oct. 9, 1862. 

John Mooney, of Holderness. 

Resigned March 2, 1863. 
Henry 0. Sargent, of Manchester. 
' Resigned Dec. 22, 1863. 

George H. Drevy, of Milford. 

Captured July 30, 1864. Exchanged. Mustered out June 10, 1865. 

Co. B. — Captains — Samuel J. Alexander, of Concord. 

Wounded severely in action July 13, 1863, at Jacksonville, Miss. Died of 
wounds July 28, 1863. 

Orville Smith, of Lempster. 

Killed at Spottsylvania, Va., May 12, 1864. 



NINTH REGIMENT. 399 

First Lieuts. — Wm. N. Haradon, of Manchester. 

Resigned Jan. 11, 1863. 

William I. Brown, of Fisherville. 

Promoted to Adjutant Nov. 1, 1863. 

H. Baxter Quimby, of Lisbon. 
Captured at Poplar Grove Church, Va., Sept. 30, 1864. Escaped. Promot- 
ed to Captain May 1, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — T. Melville Chisholm, of Milton. 

Resigned Oct. 9, 1862. 

Horace Rolfe, of Concord. 

Resigned March 11, 1863. 

John C. Sampson, of Rochester. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Jan. 1, 1864. 

Henry E. Hubbard, of Keene. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 

Co. C. — Captains — ^Augustus S. Edgerly, of Nashua. 

Wounded slightly Sec. 13, 1862. Killed May 6, 1864. 

Charles D. Copp, of ISTashua. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Charles "W". Tilton, of Sanbornton. 

Resigned Dec. 5, 1862. 

Charles D. Copp, of Nashua. 

Promoted to Captain July 28, 1864. 

Jerome Kelley, of Salem. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — Charles D. Capp, of Nashua. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Jan. 1, 1863. 

David F. Cheney, of Franklin. 

I Promoted to First Lieut. May 1, 1864. 

Co. D. — Captains — Chester C. Stevens, of Exeter. 

Resigned Dec. 25, 1862. 

Asa T. Hutchinson, of Manchester. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — ^Andrew J. Hough, of Dover. 

Promoted to Captain Nov. 22, 1862. 

John E. Mason, of Manchester. 

Discharged for ^lisability March 9, 1865. 

John Thompson, of Swanzey. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — Albert G. Merrill, of Conway. 

Resigned Dec. 22, 1862. 

George "W". Emery, of Dover. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Jan. 1, 1864. 



400 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

John Donovan, of Dover. 

Discharged for disability Feb. 17, 1866. 

Co. E, — Captains — Daniel C. Buswell, of Lebanon. 

Wounded July 22, 1864. Died of wounds Aug. 8, 1864. 

Oscar D. Kobinson, of Plainfield. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Asa T. Hutchinson, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Captain Jan. 1, 1863. 

Charles A. Harnden, of Hillsborough. 

Resigned July 29, 1863. 

John C. Sampson, of Rochester. 

Killed near Petersburg, Va., July 30, 1864. 

Oscar D. Robinson, of Plainfield. 

Promoted to Adjutant March,!, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — James K". Edminster, of Cornish. 

Resigned Oct. 27, 1862. 

H. Baxter Quimby, of Lisbon. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Not. 1, 1864. 

Oscar D. Robinson, of Plainfield. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Nov. 1, 1864. 

Co. E. — Captains — Andrew J. Stone, of Dunbarton. 

Wounded May 18, 1864. Died of wounds May 20, 1864. 

Ervin T. Case, of Ifewport. 

Mustered out June 10, 1866. 

First Lieuts. — ^William Pitt Moses, of Great Falls. 

Appointed Quartermaster Nov. 13, 1862. 
S. Henry Sprague, of Keene. 

Died at Cincinnati, Ohio, Aug. 17, 1863. 

Edward C. Babb, of Concord. 

Promoted to Captain Feb. 1, 1868. 

Second Lieuts. — John E. Mason, of Manchester. 

Promoted to First Lieut Nov. 22, 1862. 

Ludo B. Little, of Lyman. 

Wounded severely Dec. 13, 1862. Promoted to First Lieut. May 1, 1863. 

Charles W. Wilcox. 

Captured May 12, 1864. Exchanged. Honorably discharged May 15, 1865. 

Co. G.— Captains— Smith 0. Whitfield, of Francestown. 

Wounded Sept. 17, 1862. Promoted to Lieut. Colonel 123d U S C T 
Oct. 7, 1864. ■ ' 

Edward C. Babb, of Concord. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 

First Lieuts.— Orville Smith, of Lempster. 

Promoted to Captain Nov. 1, 1863. 



NINTH JREOIMENT. 401 

S. Horace Perry, of Keeue. 

Honorably discharged April 20, 1864. 

Stacy W. Hall, of Dover. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — C. A. Harnden, of Hillsborough. 
Wounded Dec. 13, 1863. Promoted to First Lieut. Jan. 1, 1864. 

William D. Rice, of Clareraont. 
Wounded May 12, 1864. Killed at Poplar Grove Church, Va., Sept. 30, 1804. 

Co. H. — Captains — Charles "W. Edgerjv, of Rochester. 

"Resigned Feb. 17, 1863. 

James Blaisdell, of Rochester. 

Dismissed August 4, 1864. 

Benjamin R. Allen, of ^Newport. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — John C Lewis, of Lancaster. 

Killed at Fredericksburg, Va., Deo. 13, 1862. 

James Blaisdell, of Rochester. 

Promoted to Captain Feb. 28, 1863. 

Edwin Greene, of Concord. 

Wounded July 30, 1864. Mustered out June 10, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — James Blaisdell, of Rochester. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Jan. 1, 1863. 

Edward C. Babb, of Concord. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Jan. 1, 1864. 

L Leonard Harlow, of Lisbon. 

Honorably discharged Dec. 19, 1864. 

Co. L — Captains — John W. Babbitt, of Keene. 

Promoted to Lieut. Colonel Nov. 22, 1862. 

Andrew J. Hough, of Dover. 
Wounded severely and captured July 30, 1864. Paroled. Discharged on 
account of wounds June 22, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Jacob Greene, of Keene. 

Besigned March 8, 1864. 

David F. Cheney, of Franklin. 

Wounded July 30, 1864. Discharged for disability Nov. 30, 1884. 

Charles J. Richards, of Great Falls. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — ^Nelson If. Sawyer, of Keene. 

Besigned Sept. 29, 1862. 

Edwin Greene, of Concord. 

Promoted to First Lieut. March 1, 1863. 
George P. Sylvester, of Gilmanton. 
Woonded May 12, 1864. Died of wounds at Washington, D. C, June 5, 1864. 



402 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

Oo. K. — Captain — Jolm B. Cooper, of ll^^ewport. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — ^Ervin T. Case, of Newport. 

Promoted to Captain July 28, 1864. 

Benjamin R. Allen, of 2*J"ewport. 

Wounded Sept. 30, 1864. Promoted to Captain Feb. 1, 1865. 

Franklin J. Burnham, of Plainfield. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — "William I. Brown, of Fistierville. 

Promoted to First Lieut. March 1, 1863. 

Benjamin E.. Allen, of ifTewport. 

Promoted to First Lieut Sept. 16, 1864. 
COLONEL ENOCH Q. FELLOWS. 

Cglonel Fellows was born at Sandwich, Carroll Coun- 
ty, New Hampshire, on the 20th of June, 1825. His 
father was a respectable farmer, in humble circum- 
stances. He attended public schools in his native town 
until old enough to go to an academy, from which time 
until he was nineteen years old he attended different 
academies and taught school alternately. He had nearly 
completed his preparatory college course when he re- 
ceived an appointment to the United States Military 
Academy at "West Point, where he entered in 1844, and 
remained about two and a half years, standing, when 
he left fifth in his class in conduct, and eight in general 
standing. Among his school fellows there were George 
B. McClellan, Ambrose E. Burnside, D. N. Couch and 
Jesse L. Eeno, all of whom were Major Generals in the 
Union army, the famous Stonewall Jackson, of the rebel 
army, and many others who were prominent actors 
during the war. 

After leaving West point Colonel Fellows' returned 
to his native town, and for years took an active part in 
the militia of the State. He held several commissions 
and rose to the rank of Brigadier General. In 1854 
ihe was appointed Inspector in the Boston Custom 




•tyGEPeriM,! 



.jr-fc* 



tfi-e-ct^-e-A ^ ^^i^^J^x^A/ 



ENOCH O FELLOM^'S, 
Col 9*NHV 



NINTH BEQIMENT. 403 

House, whicli position lie held three years. When the 
rebellion broke out, in 1861, Colonel Fellows was -the first 
man in the State, north of Concord, to volunteer, and 
one of the very first to take an active part in enlisting 
and organizing the three months volunteers, called for 
by President Lincoln, immediately after the surrender 
of Fort Sumter to the rebels. He acted as Adjutant 
during the organization of the First Regiment, was 
commissioned to that place by Governor Goodwin, 
served with the regiment during its term of enlistment, 
returned with it to the State, and the next day after 
being mustered out was commissioned Colonel of the 
Third Regiment. He organized this regiment and 
commanded it about a year — except about three months, 
when he was acting Brigadier General. When General 
T. W. Sherman was getting up his great [N'aval Expedi- 
tion he came to Concord and obtained the promise of 
the Governor that the Third Regiment, then being 
organized, should form a part of it. Colonel Fellows 
was the first Colonel of the fifteen regiments composing 
that expedition to be mustered in, and the Third was 
the first regiment to report to General Sherman in 'Eew 
York City, and he was consequently the ranking Colonel 
of the Expedition. The Expedition took Port Royal 
on the 7th of llifovember, 1861. During the months of 
December, 1861, and January, 1862, all the brigadier 
generals were assigned to duty elsewhere, and Colonel 
Fellows was appointed the first commandant at Hilton 
Head, S. C. He enjoyed the most unbounded confidence 
of General Sherman, both as an officer and a gentleman, 
till he was relieved in March, 1862. Having been 
absent from his home about a year he then asked for 
a furlough, and General Sherman endorsed his applica^ 
tion as follows — ^he having been relieved : " The valua- 
ble service performed in the Expeditionery Corps by 
Colonel Fellows, and his long and close attention to 



404 TEE OBEAT REBELLION. 

Ms important duties here, renders the indulgence 
asked for a very reasonable one, which I intended to 
grant him." Colonel Fellows' request was granted at 
onc^, but just then there was a disturbance at Edisto 
Island, and General Benham asked General Sherman 
which was the best regiment to send, and was answered, 
the Third ISTew Hampshire, and that regiment was ac- 
cordingly ordered there. Colonel Fellows then told 
General Benham that, under the circumstances, he did 
not wish to avail himself of his furlough at that time, 
if he could be of service. The General expressed many 
thanks for the offer, and immediately placed Colonel 
Fellows in~ command of all the troops at Edisto and 
vicinity, consisting of three and a half regiments of 
infantry, one company of cavalry, four pieces of artil- 
lery, and one gunboat. He remained there three or 
four weeks, and drove the rebels from Jehosse Island, 
and after the capture of Fort Pulaski, and all had 
become quiet. Colonel Fellows was relieved and received 
his furlough. 

While at home, without his knowledge, the Governor 
tod Council, the Adjutant General and Secretary of 
State recommended him to President Lincoln for an 
appointment as Brigadier General of United States Vol- 
unteers, as a man well qualified by education, ability 
and experience to fill the position with honor to the 
state and benefit to the service. When the N^inth Regi- 
ment was being enlisted, about this time. Governor 
Berry offered the command of it to Colonel Fellpws, 
which he said he would accept, if the Governor thought 
best. He accordingly resigned his commission as 
Colonel of the Third, and accepted that of Colonel of 
the Mnth, on the 14th of June, 1862. On arrival in 
Washington with the Mnth Regiment, Colonel Fellows 
was immediately assigned to the command of a brigade, 
though not the ranking colonel. This was about the 



NINTB REGIMENT. 405 

time of General Pope's defeat^ and in a few days the 
army was reorganized under General McCIeMan, and the 
Ninth Regiment was assigned to an old brigade ; and in 
less than three weeks from the time the regiment left 
New Hampshire it was engaged in the battles of South 
Mountain and Antietam. At South Mountain the Ninth 
Regiment, under Colonel Fellows, made one of the most 
brilliant bayonet ■ charges of the whole war, drove a 
rebel battery from the field, capturing several prisoners, 
and he was especially complimented on the field by 
Brigadier General Nagle, in command of the brigade, 
and Major General Reno,' in command of the corps. 
General Reno had scarcely turned his horse from 
Colonel Fellows to depart, after congratulating him 
upon the good behavior of his men, when he received 
his death wound. Soon after the battle of Antietam, 
Colonel Fellows broke down in health and resigned. 
He was undoubtedly one of the most capable of&cers in 
the army from New Hampshire during the four years 
continuance of the war. He was always faithful and 
attentive to duty and cool and skillful in action. His 
military education and experience, at a time when 
there were but few men in the State who knew any 
thing about the requirements of troops fitting for the 
field, were of great benefit to the service. 

At the close of his military service Colonel Fellows 
returned to his native town. Sandwich, where he has 
since resided. In 1868 and 1869 he was an active and 
valuable member of the popular branch of the New 
Hampshire Legislature from Sandwich; and in the 
latter year was appointed a United States Assistant 
Ass'essor of Internal Revenue in the First District. 
His principal business is that of private banker, at St. 
Paul, Minnesota, where he has a partner, and from 
which he derives a handsome income. 



406 THE GREAT BEBELLION. 



COLONEL HEKBEKT B. TITUS. 

At the time the rebellion broke out Colonel Titus was 
engaged in teaching, at Chesterfield, Cheshire County, 
New Hampshire, and was among the first men in that 
County to enlist under the call of the President for 
seveniy-five thousand volunteers for three months, and 
was on the 4th of June, 1861, commissioned Second 
Lieutenant of Company A, in the Second Regiment, in 
which position he served, sharing the fortunes of that 
regiment, until June, 1862, when he was promoted to 
Major of the Ninth New -Hampshire Regiment. He 
was promoted to Lieut. Colonel of the same on the 26th 
of August, of the same year, and on the resignation of 
Colonel Fellows, was promoted to Colonel on the 22d of 
November, in which position he continued until the 
muster out of his regiment, June 10, 1865. He was , 
wounded in the battle of Antietam by a rifle ball, while 
he was himself using a musket. His loss to the regi- 
ment was very severely felt, for he had already won the 
confidence of the men, and Colonel Fellows was the 
only field officer left — Major Everett not yet having join- 
ed the command. On this occasion, and also at South 
Mountain, a few days previous, Lieut. Colonel Titus 
distinguished himself for gallantry and skill. During 
his term in the army he was often in command of a 
brigade, and rendered valuable service in every position 
where the fortunes of war placed him. He returned to 
the State with his regiment, after .the close of the war, 
and was mustered out with it. Subsequent to the close 
of the war Colonel Titus purchased an extensive tract 
of land in Virginia, where he now resides, engaged in 
its care and cultivation. 



NINTH REGIMENT. 407 



MAJOR GEORGE WASHINGTON EVERETT. 

Major Everett was born at JSTew London, Merrimack 
County, !N"ew Hampshire, on the 19th of November, 
1819. He was educated in the public schools and acad- 
emy of his native town. He pursued a course of legal 
study in the office of "Walter P. Flanders, Esq., and was 
admitted to the Merrimack County Bar in October 1847. 
During his whole course of study he was dependent 
upon his own exertions for means, and exhibited great 
diligence and ambition. Soon after he was admitted to 
the bar he commenced the practice of law in his native 
town, where he continued until he entered the army. 
In 1852 and 1856 he was elected a member from N"ew 
London of the iJT.ew Hampshire House of Representa^ 
tives, and took a prominent part on committees and in 
debates. He was Solicitor for Merrimack County five 
years, from 1856 to 1861, and discharged the duties of 
that office in an able and acceptable manner. 

Li the summer of 1862, Major Everett felt that he 
owed a duty, and his life, if need be, to his country, and 
accordingly offered his services to the Governor. He 
was commissioned Major of the Mnth Regiment on the 
26th of August, 1862, but did not leave the State with 
his regiment, on account of sickness, but joined it soon 
afterward, and was with it in several battles and skir- 
mishes, in all of which he proved himself a brave and 
faithful officer. Li August 1863, as the Ninth Regiment 
was coming up the Mississippi river from Vicksburg, 
Major Everett was taken dangerously ill, and continuing 
to grow worse, he stopped on his arrival at Cincinnati, 
hoping that a few days rest would restore him to health ; 
but ■ he failed rapidly until the 27th of August, 1863, 
when he died, lamented by his regiment and a very 
large circle of friends in New Hampshire. His remains 



408 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

were sent home in charge of Lieut. Orville Smith, to his 
sorrowing wife and family. His funeral took place at 
!N"ew London on the 31st of August, and was attended 
by a very large concourse of friends and citizens. At 
the conclusion of the general services in the Baptist 
church, where he had been a worshipper from early 
boyhood, the body was given in charge of the Mount 
Horeb Commaudery of Knights Templar, of Concord, 
of which organization the deceased was an esteemed 
associate, and by the members was conveyed to the 
village cemetery, where with impressive ceremonies it 
was sacredly consigned to the grave. 

The Mnth Regiment left Concord for "Washington on 
the 25th of August, 1862, and was soan encamped at 
Arlington Heights. This was among the darkest days 
of the rebellion, when General Pope's broken and dis- 
pirited troops were falling back upon the national capi- 
tal. Lee had invaded Maryland and was marching on 
Harrisburg. 

All available troops were being brought into the field, 
and the Ninth left camp on the 6th of September to join 
the armies reunited under McClellan, and already mov- 
ing to oppose the progress of Lee. The regiment was 
assigned to the First Brigade, Second Division, Mnth 
Corps, Colonel James N'agle, of the Forty-eighth Penn- 
sylvania, commanding the brigade, which was then on 
the march, and which was overtaken by the Ninth at 
the Monocacy river, on the 13th of September. 

BATTLE OE SOUTH MOUNTAIN. 

About noon on the 14th of September the Mnth Regi- 
ment was ordered into the field for its first battle, which 
had already commenced at South Mountain. The ene- 
my occupied the crest of the mountain, the sides of 
which were steep and rugged, covered with wood and 



milTE REGIMENT. 409 

underbrush. The Ninth was formed in line of battle, 
about half way up the mountain, and was ordered to 
charge, by Colonel Fellows, which they did in the most 
gallant style. The rebels opened upon them from above, 
but most of the bullets passed over their heads. A 
cross fire from a rebel battery caused some confusion in 
the line, but did not stop its progress. The enemy 
hastily retreated, leaving the summit of the mountain in 
the hands of the Ninth and their comrades. For its 
gallantry the regiment was complimented by Colonel 
Nagle, commanding the brigade, and General Reno, 
commanding the corps. The regiment suffered a loss 
of twenty-five men wounded, two of whom subsequently 
died. 

BATTLE OF ANTIETAM. 

On the morning of the 17th of September the Mnth 
Regiment moved on to the battle ground of Antietam, 
and took position with the Ninth Corps, on the left of 
the army, opposite the famous stone bridge over Antie- 
tam Creek. The enemy was formidably posted on the 
opposite side, on a high, steep bank, heavily wooded, 
and presenting a discouraging obstacle to an advance. 
The lines were formed along the banks of the stream, 
at a distance of little more than two rods apart. For 
two hours each side poured into the other an incessant 
fire of musketry, the enemy having the advantage in 
position, being considerably higher than the Union 
lines, and partly protected by rude earth works. During 
this terrific fire Lieut. Colonel Titus was wounded, while 
himself using a rifie. Colonel Fellows was the only 
field officer left — Major Everett not yet having joined 
the regiment. The Ninth behaved admirably during 
the fight and in the fierce contest which ensued in the 
passage of the bridge, not a man left the ranks except 
he was ordered away with some wounded .comrade. 



410 TEE QBE AT REBELLION. 

The bridge was ^nally carried by storm, and the Mnth 
was one of the first regiments over, climbing the oppo- 
site slope under a murderous artillery fire. The enemy 
was forced back, and night came on with a substantial 
victory for the Union arms. The Ninth lost in the 
engagement ten men killed and eighty wounded. 
Among the wounded, besides Lieut. Colonel Titus, were 
Captains Cooper and Whitfield. For a regiment not 
yet a month old, and with only the discipline and drill 
of an active campaign, amid the smoke and confusion 
of the battle field, the conduct of the Ninth deserved 
and received special commendation. I 

On the 1st of October the brigade moved to Pleasant 
Valley and went into camp. On the 26th the army 
commenced its pursuit of Lee. Major Everett joined 
the regiment soon after.the battle pf Antietam. On the 
17th of November, while at "Warrentoo, Colonel Fellows 
resigned, on account of impaired health, and on the 22d 
Lieut. Colonel Titus was commissioned Colonel, and 
Captain John W. Babbitt, of Company I, was promoted 
to Lieut. Colonel. When General Burn side assumed 
command of the army of the Potomac, the Ninth Corps 
was placed in command of General Wilcox, and was 
assigned to the right grand division under General 
Sumner. The division to which the Ninth belonged 
was commanded by General Sturgis. General Sumner 
was the first to reach the Rappahannock, and encamped 
to the north and east of Falmouth, where the Ninth 
Regiment was engaged in camp duties until the 

BATTLE OF FREDERICKSBURG. 

On the 12th of December the Ninth Regiment crossed 
the Rappahannock and remained in the streets of Fred- 
ericksburg all that day and the succeeding night. Early 
the next • morning heavy firing commenced, and the 



NINTH REGIMENT. 411 

regiment was put under arms, and so continued until 
one o'clock in tlie afternoon, when the brigade was 
ordered into the fight, a sin'gle regiment at a time. The 
Ninth moved to the left and rear of the city, and swing- 
ing to the right, advanced along the open field toward 
the railroad, which having crossed, it came under a 
galling fire of artillery. Here they advanced at a double 
quick, the fire increasing each moment until they came 
to a deep cut, through which ran a carriage road, the 
sides being fifteen feet high, and nearly perpendicu- 
lar. Into this cut they rushed, when Lieutenant Lewis 
was hit by a piece of bursting shell, and fell head- 
long down the embankment a corpse. Two pieces of 
rebel artillery enfiladed the road, and poured into the 
men crowded into these narrow limits a murderous fire 
of shell and canister. Many of the officers and men, 
with great courage, made their way to the summit of 
the embankment, and pulled those more heavily laden 
up after them. Here the same murderous fire from the 
front, increased by volleys of musketry, met them full 
in the face. There was, however, no stop, and, swinging 
to the left, the Mnth advanced across an open field, 
every foot of which was exposed to the fire of the rebel 
artillery, and was already thickly strewn with dead and 
wounded, the Ninth adding its quota to the ghastly 
scene. In crossing fences and ditches the companies 
got somewhat separated from each other. The color- 
bearer was mortally wounded, and several of the color- 
guard had been killed or disabled. When Sergeant 
Dinsmore, who carried the national colors, fell mortally 
wounded, Lieut. C. D. Copp, of Company C, caught 
them up, and, advancing to the front, waved them, ex- 
claiming, " Hurrah, boys ! Come on ! " maintaining his 
position until the front line was reached. Here the 
men, sheltering themselves as much as possible behind 
knolls, embankments and stone walls, kept up a nearly 



412 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

fruitless fire on the impregnable position of the enemy 
until after dark, when it was withdrawn to the city, and 
recrossed the river with the rest of the corps and went 
into camp on its old ground, -The Ninth was com- 
manded in this battle by Lieut. Colonel Babbitt. The 
loss of the regiment was four killed and eighty-two 
wounded. Lieut. Lewis was among the killed, and 
Captain A. S. Edgerly and Lieut. Charles A. Harndon 
were of the. wounded. 

The Ninth Regiment remained in camp opposite 
Fredericksburg until the fore part of February, 1863, 
when with its Corps it was ordered to Newport News,, 
and from thence on the 25th of March embarked for 
Baltimore, on its way to Lexington, Kentucky, where 
it arrived on the 31st. The brigade was broken up 
and the regiments were scattered about the State for 
the purpose of fostering the Union sentiment and dis- 
couraging the appearance of disloyalty. The Ninth 
was in the Blue Grass region, where provisions were 
abundant and cheap, and the men lived upon the fat of 
the land. On the 2d of May the Ninth marched to 
Paint Lick, where it joined the rest of the brigade, 
which was soon ordered to join General Grant's force 
which was besieging Vicksburg, where they arriV^ed 
about the middle of June. General Johnston's army 
was approaching from the east and threatening Grant's 
rear. To meet the emergency the Ninth Corps was, 
two days after its arrival, embarked on boats and sent 
up the Mississippi to the Yazoo, and up that river to 
Milldale,.a mile or two from Haines' Bluff, where a line 
of defense was taken up, stretching from the Yazoo on 
the north to the Big Black on the south. Timber was 
slashed and batteries were erected along the line, and 
the approach of Johnston to the relief of Vicksburg 
was thus effectually cut off. Here the men were sub- 



IflNTS BEQIMENT. 413 

jectea to the severest toil, many privations and a most 
unhealthy climate. 

Vicksburg surrendered on the 4th of July, and Johns- 
ton began to retreat, with the Ninth Corps in hot 
pursuit. On the 5th General Sherman came up with 
the Fourteenth Corps, and assumed command of the 
whole force engaged in the chase. Johnston made a 
stand at Jackson, and awaited the arrival of Sherman. 
On the night of the 13th, Captain Alexander, of Com- 
pany B, who had posted his men on the picket line and 
was attempting to pass back in the intense darkness, 
along the line, was shot by his own men, who had been 
ordered to fire upon any object approaching from that 
direction. Captain Alexander died in consequence on 
the 23d. Two or three hours later a party of rebels, 
who knew the ground perfectly, crept stealthily upon 
that portion of the line, and bayoneted private Dustin, 
of Company B, whose death-cry brought every man 
instantly to his feet. Others had hand to hand conflicts 
with their assailants, and one or two were wounded : 
but all stood their ground, and though they could only 
fire at random upon their unseen foe, the attack was 
repulsed and the line held. Preparations were made 
for storming the town, but Johnston retired to Meridian, 
and Sherman not thinking it expedient to follow him 
into the enemy's country, returned with his command 
to Milldale, about sixty miles. 

On the 10th of August the Mnth embarked and 
arrived at Covington, Kentucky, on the 21st. On the 
way Major Everett was taken sick and died soon after 
reaching Cincinnati. After four days passed at Coving- 
ton they removed to Camp N'elson, near Mcholasville. 
General Burnside had taken Knoxville, and the Mnth 
Corps was called upon by him to take part in the cam- 
paign in East Tennessee, while the Mnth Regiment was 
sent to Paris to guard the railroad between Cincinnati 



414 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

and Camp Kelson, being scattered along in detachments 
for a distance of twenty miles. The regiment was 
suffering extremely from disease occasioned by the 
miasma of the Yazoo swamps, so that the monthly 
returns for August showed that out of three hundred 
and six present, one hundred and forty-three were on the 
sick list, while most of the officers were at home on 
sick leave. Though the men had the best of care and 
hospital accommodations, it was many weeks before they 
fully recovered from the effects of the disease contracted 
on the Yazoo. 

During the month of December a large number of 
recruits joined the regiment, most of whom were a 
disgrace to the service. The whole number assigned 
to the Ninth during 1863 and 1864, was eight hundred 
and twenty-eight, and of these four hundred and forty- 
four either never reached their command, or deserted 
very soon afterward, while of those who remained many 
were worthless, from various causes. The regiment, 
by its good conduct won the confidence and esteem of 
the people, who expressed their regret when it was 
removed. 

The Mnth was relieved from duty on the railroad on 
the 15th of January, 1864, and soon after proceeded to 
Cumberland river, arriving at Camp Burnside, at the 
head of steamboat navigation, on the 30th, where a 
force was needed to protect the supplies for the army in 
East Tennessee, which were sent forward to Knoxville 
by way of Cumberland Gap, by large trains of pack 
mules. Soon guerillas began to be troublesome in the 
mountain districts, and the Mnth New Hampshire Regi- 
ment and First Ohio Artillery were ordered to proceed 
to Knoxville, by different routes — the latter to do duty 
in the town and the former to rejoin the Ninth Corps. 
The march was one of extreme hardship and privation, 
the men suffering as none others suffered, perhaps, 



NINTH REGIMENT. 415 

except in East Tennessee. They reached Knoxville on 
the 17th of March, and joined the Mnth Corps. On the 
21st the Corps started for central Kentucky, and the 
regiment re-crossed the Cumberland Mountains by a 
new route, and came out at Camp Burnside on the 27th, 
and four days later reached Nicholasville again. 

The Mnth was ordered to Annapolis, Md., where it 
arrived on the 5th of April, and was placed in the 
Second Brigade of the Second Division, with the Sixth 
and Eleventh New Hampshire, under the command of 
Colonel S. Gr. Griffin, of the former regiment. Here 
convalescents and recruits arrived sufficient to swell the 
number of men present for duty to five hundred and 
twenty-eight. The brigade to which the Ninth belonged 
crossed the Eappahannock and joined the Army of the 
Potomac on the 4th of May. 

At the battle of the "Wilderness, on the 6th of May, 
Captain Augustus S. Edgerly, of Company C, who was 
serving on the staff of Colonel Griffin, was killed. The 
division moved to Eredericksburg, on the 9th, and 
bivouacked just inside the works surrounding the city. 
Here Colonel Titus was carried to the hospital, sick with 
a fever, and the command of the regiment devolved 
upon Major Chandler. 

BATTLE OF SPOTTSYLVANIA. 

At daybreak on the 12th of May a grand charge was 
ordered along the whole line, the signal for which was 
to be the opening of the artillery. The Ninth Eegiment 
numbered about five hundred muskets, and never in 
better discipline, was stationed on the extreme right of 
the Ninth Corps. The brigade moved' forward in line 
of battle, preceded by the skirmishers. Companies I 
and G, which, commanded by Captain Hough, and 
Lieuts. Eice and Sylvester, in their progress captured 



416 THE GREAT REBELLION . 

about fifty of the enemy's skirmishers. In moving 
through a dense pine forest the Ninth, though preserving 
its line as well as possible, got partially separated from 
the rest of the brigade, and gained the open field in 
front considerably in advance of them. The Second 
Corps was immediately on the right, and had charged 
a little in advance of the Ninth. They had already 
reached the rebel works, taken possession of the first 
line, with a large number of prisoners, and were now 
being hard pressed by a counter march on the part of 
the rebels. As the Ninth issued from the woods with 
the remainder of the brigade, the second Corps set up 
a loud cheer at the sight of reinforcements. A shower 
of bullets from the rebels greeted their appearance, 
but they were so widely aimed that few took effect. 
The brigade moved steadily forward and down the 
intervening slope, over fallen trees and piles of brush, 
toward the enemy, concealed by a dense fog which 
covered the field, but who were pouring forth in dense 
masses to meet the. impending assault. At this junc- 
ture an officer of the Second Corps rode up, shouting, 
" Colonel, or whoever commands that battalion, for 
God's sake change front, for they are coming in on 
my left ! " In another moment he fell from his horse 
pierced by a rebel bullet. Major Chandler gave the 
necessary order and the regiment commenced the move- 
ment, when the rebel bullets began to take effect. A 
series of light outer works, from which the rebel pickets 
had retired was soon reached, when the command was 
given to halt and fire. At the first volley many of the 
pieces were so damp that they missed fire, while others 
were so dainaged that the cartridges barely ignited 
sufficiently to empty the barrels. The fire of the enemy 
increased to a continued roar, who emerged from the 
fog directly in front and to the left of the Ninth, at a 
distance of scarcely a hundred paces, and advancing 



NINTH BEQIMENT. 417 

in three lines of battle. A conflict more terrible, and 
a slaughter more destructive than any in which the 
regiment had ever engaged, now ensued. The two 
lines advanced so closely together that their rifles flashed 
in each other's faces. The left was separated from the 
rest of the brigade, and was wholly unprotected. The 
enemy were rapidly swinging round into the rear, and 
the only alternative was to fall back while the way 
was yet open ; and rallying around the colors, already 
pierced by a score of bullets, the regiment fell back 
to the woods, leaving the dead and wounded on the 
field. While falling back the color-bearer was wounded, 
and Corporal Parsons, of Company E, seizing the national 
colors, bravely shouted to the men to rally around 
and protect them. Major Chandler was wounded, and 
would have fallen into the hands of the enemy had not 
some of the men taken him in a blanket and borne him 
from the field. The woods gained, the remnant of the 
battalion was reorganized and took position with the 
brigade in the line, which was successfully held against 
the enemy during the day. 

Captain Smith was killed; Lieut. Colonel Babbitt, 
who was temporarily in command of the Thirty-second 
Maine, was wounded ; Lieut. Sylvester was wounded 
mortally ; Major Chandler seriously, and Lieut. Wilcox 
was captured. Forty-two enlisted men were killed out- 
right, ninety-four were wounded, and seventy were 
missing. The latter were nearly all wounded, and in 
the hands of the enemy. The fight was short, but the 
most severe one in which the Mnth Regiment was 
engaged. 

On the 18th another advance was ordered, in which 
the Ninth, with other regiments, was used as support. 
It was exposed to a severe artillery fire, during which 
Captain Stone, who was in command of the regiment, 
was mortally wounded. The command then devolved 



418 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

upon Captain Baswell. The regiment lost, besides 
Captain Stone, two men killed and seventy-six more 
or less wounded. At Ptolopotamy Creek, on the 28th 
in a skirmish with the enemy, the regiment lost one 
man killed and sixteen wounded. At Cold Harbor, on 
the 3d of June, the Mnth supported a battery, and 
suffered a loss of only one or two men wounded. 

On the 16th of June, after a march of thirty miles, 
the Ninth with its brigade arrived in the vicinity of 
Petersburg, and during the night, in which it was en- 
gaged in a smart skirmish with the enemy, several men 
were wounded. The next day the regiment had fifteen 
men wounded out of the hundred and twenty-five to 
which its effective strength had been reduced. The 
next two months the Ninth spent in the trenches before 
Petersburg, participating with the other troops in the 
hardships of the siege. On the 3d of July Captain 
Little was badly, and on the 22d Captain Buswell 
mortally wounded by stray shots from the enemy. 

In the battle of the " Mine," on the 30th of July, 
the Ninth bore a prominent part. Its position was in 
the first line of the division, just in front of the rebel 
fort, where the troops were massed for the assault. At 
the instant of the explosion it sprang forward, and was 
the first to plant its colors on the ruined work. In the 
fierce conflict that ensued for the possession of what 
had been gained, the regiment was conspicuous. Twice 
its colors fell, but they were quickly raised again. Ser- 
geant Wilkins re-captured the flag of the Twenty-first 
Massachusetts, which had been taken, and afterward 
received a medal from the "War Department in ac- 
knowledgment of his gallantry. Lieut. Simons, then 
a sergeant, pushed far ahead of his regiment, and found 
himself surrounded but refused to surrender. He shot 
one man, bayoneted another, was knocked down with 
the butend of a musket, was helped into a bomb-proof 



NINTH REGIMENT. 419 

where were five North Carolinians, all of whom he cap- 
tured and brought into the Union lines in triumph. 
Captain Hough, who commanded the regiment was 
frightfully wounded, taken prisoner, but was subse- 
quently exchanged. In the retreat which followed 
Lieut. Sampson was killed, Lieuts. Green and Cheney 
were wounded, and Lieut. Drew was captured. Besides 
these the regiment lost in killed, wounded and missing, 
ninety-two, or about one-half the number engaged. 

On the 30th of September, at Poplar Grove Church, 
the Ninth Regiment was again engaged, but from the 
superior force of the enemy was obliged to retreat to 
save itself from capture — a fate which all did not escape. 
Lieuts. Rice and Emery, the latter, at the time, on Gen- 
eral Griffin's staff, were killed^ Liejit. Allen was wound- 
ed, and Lieut. Quimby captured. One hundred and 
twenty enlisted men were killed, wounded or missing. 
The color-bearer, Corporal Brown, who showed signal 
bravery at the battle of the " Mine," was captured, 
though not till he had stripped the colors from the staff 
and torn them into shreds. 

The regiment rested until the 27th of October, when 
it participated in the movement on Hatcher's Run-, but 
were not actively engaged. On the 6th of November 
Colonel Titus returned to the regiment ; on the 8th the 
men voted for President ; on the 24th they celebrated 
Thanksgiving, a bountiful dinner having been sent them 
from home ; ■ on the 29th the Corps was moved to the 
Jerusalem Plank Road, and the Ninth was stationed in 
the rear of Fort Alexander Hayes, where they passed 
an agreeable vrinter. During the winter Colonel Titus 
was much of the time in command of the brigade, and 
the command of the regiment devolved on Captain 
Cooper. 

The Ninth took no active part in the battles in the 
month of April, 1865, which sealed the fate of the Con- 



4i20 THE QBE AT REBELLION. 

federacy, being a part of tlie force left to hold the lines 
in front of the city of Petersburg, -while the final flank 
movement of the Army of the Potomac was being made 
on the left. The Mnth, with two other regiments, was 
detailed on the 6th to guard Ewell's army, to the num- 
ber of eight thousand men, which had been captured 
two days before. The regiment embarked for Alexan- 
dria, which place it reached on the 27th, and remained 
there about a month. It participated in the grand 
review of the army at Washington on the 23d of May. 
All the recruits of the Ninth were transferred to the 
Sixth New Hampshire Regiment. The Mnth was mus- 
tered out of the United States service on the 10th of 
June, the next day started for home, and on the 14th 
Colonel Titus returned the colors to the Grovernor at the 
State House, the men deposited their arms at the mili- 
tary depot, the regiment was discharged and paid, 
leaving' an imperishable record upon the roll of feime. 



TENTS REGIMENT. 



TENTH REGIMENT. 



421 



The Tenth Regiment was raised under a call in July, 
1862, from the War Department for three hundred 
thousand three years troops. The State bounty of fifty 
dollars was continued to all new recruits, and towns, to 
avoid the impending draft, voted liberal bounties to 
their citizens who would enhst and be counted on their 
respective quotas. Capt. Michael T. Donohoe, of the 
Third Regiment, was appointed Colonel and John 
Coughlin, of Manchester, was commissioned Lieut. 
Colonel. Both these gentlemen, with other officers 
appointed for the regiment, commenced the work of 
enlisting men, about the middle of July. These gentle- 
men appealed to the patriotism of the people, stating the 
necessities of the country in eloquent terms, and called 
upon their fellow countrymen to fill the ranks of the 
Tenth Regiment without delay, and defend the flag of 
their adopted country. The camp was established at 
Manchester, which city famished the largest part of six, 
companies. The men began to arrive at the rendezvous 
on the 20th of August, and on the 5th of September the 
organization of the regiment was completed, and it was 
mustered into the United States service, numbering 
nine hundred and twenty-eight officers and men. The 
following were the field, staff and line officers, with their 
official record, during the whole term of service of the 
regiment: 

FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS. 

Colonel — Michael T. Donohoe, of Manchester. 

Wounded slightly Sept, 29, 1864. Discharged for disabilty Jan. 18, 1865. 
Discharge reroked by Special Orders No. 100, War Department, A. O. Office, 



422 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

Feb. 28, 1866. Appointed Brigadier (General U. S. V., by brevet, for galliuit 
conduct in the field, to date from March 18, 1866. Mustered out aa Colonel 
June 21, 1866^ 

Lieut. Colonel — John Coiighlin, of Manchester. 

Appointed Colonel TJ. S. V., by brevet, for gallant conduct in the field, to 
date from April 9, 1865. Mustered out as Lieut. Colonel June 21, 1865. 

Majors — Jesse F. Angell, of Manchester. 

Wounded severely May 13, 1864. Discharged on account of wounds, Oct. 
19, 1864. 

Timothy B. Crowley, of iN'ashua. 

Mustered out June 21, 1866. 

Adjutants — ^William H. D. Cochrane, of Goffstown. 

B^igned April 16, 1863. 

Joseph J. Donohoe, of Manchester. 

Wounded severely June 3, 1863. Cashiered April 28t 1865. 

David A. Worthley, of Goffstown. 

' Mustered out June 21, 1866. 
Quartermasters — Thomas Sullivan, of Nashua. 

Dismissed Nov. 22, 1862. 
Foster Kimball, of Manchester. 
Discharged fot disability Nov. 26, 1864. Discharge revoked by Special 
Orders No. 39, War Department, A. G. Office, Jan. 25, 1865. Mustered out 
June 21, 1866. 

Surgeons — John Ferguson, of Manchester. 

Resigned Aug. 16, 1863. 

Horatio N". Small. 

Mustered out June 21, 1866. 
Assistant Surgeons — Henry J. Harwood, of Salem. 

Died of disease, at Suffolk, Va., March 17, 1863; 
Thomas K Clement, of Mason. 

Honorably discharged Sept. 17, 1864. 
John Haynes, of Londonderry. 

Resigned July 30, 1863. 

■William K Wilkins, of Bedford. 

Resigned July 21, 1864. 

Albert Plummer, of Auburn. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 
Sergeant Majors — ^Ichabod S. Bartlett, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Second Lieut Nov. 24, 1862. 
Frank H. Swett, of Andover. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. Dec. 1, 1863. 
David A. Worthley, of Goffstown. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Nov. 20, 1864. 

B. Stowe Laskey, of Portsmouth. 

Mustered out June 21, 1866., 



TENTH BEOIMENT. 423 

Quarterma8ter Sergeants — Myles McSweeney. 

Appointed Hospital Steward Not. 10, 1862. 

Alfred G. Simons, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. Jan. 20, 1864. 

James B. T. Baker of Manchester. 

, Mustered out June 21, 1866. 

Commissary Sergeants — Richard H. Short. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. March 23, 1863. 

James McLaughlin. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 
Hospital Stewards — Timothy Cahill. 

Discharged for disability Not. 10, 1862. 
Myles McSweeney. 

Discharged at Lady's Home Hospital, New York, Not. 29, 1864, 

Albert Plummer, of Auburn. 

Promoted to Ass't Surgeon Jan. 4, 1865. 

George H. Aiken. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

Principal Musicians — J. W. Batchelder, of Manchester. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

George H. Minard. 

Mustered out June 21, 1866. 

.COMPANY OFFICERS. 

Co. A. — Captains — John M. Caswell, of Manchester. 

Killed at Chapiu's Farm, Va., Sept. 30, 1864. 

Jjawrence F. Larkin, of Manchester. 

Mustered out June 21, 1866. 

First Lieuts. — Thos. C. Trumbull, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Captain Jan 12, 1863. 

Andrew W. Doe, of Manchester. 
Wounded seTerely May 12, 1864. Killed near Petersburg, Va., Aug. 22, 
1864. 

David A. "Worthley, of Goffstown. 

Promoted to Adjutant May 19, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — Alonzo L. Day, of Manchester. 

Transferred to Co. D. 
John A. Eaton, of Bedford. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Jan. 1, 1864. 

Isaac C. Richardson, of itfTashua. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Feb. 23, 1866. 

Co. B. — Captain — Timothy B. Crowley, of Nashua. 

Wounded seTerely Oct. 27, 1864. Promoted to Major Not. 23, 1864. 



424 THE a BEAT REBELhlON. 

Pirst Lieuts. — George Edgcomb, of Nashua. 

Transferred to Co. C, Jan. 10, 1863. Resigned Aug. 6, 1863. 

Michael Moran, of IJTashua. 

Resigned May 18, 1863. 

Michael F. Corcoran, of Manchester. 

Transferred to Co. F. Promoted to Captain July 13, 1864. 

John B. Sargent, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Captain May 16, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — Michael Moran, of Nashua. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Jan. 10, 1863. 

Richard H. Short. 

, Dismissed Jan. 14, 1864. 

John B. Sargent, of Manchester. 

Promoted to First Lieut. July 13, 1864. 

Co. C. — Captains — Cornelius "W". Strain, of Manchester. 

Honorably discharged Sept. 19, 1864. 

George H. L. Head, of Hooksett. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — James Welch, of Raymond. 

Resigned Jan. 19, 1863. 

John C. Keenan, of Concord. 

Promoted to Captain July 13, 1863. 

Henry H. Emerson, of Dover. 

KiUed at Fair-Oaks, Va., Oct. 27, 1864. 

George W. Littlefield, of Dover. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — M. T. H. Maguire, of Manchester. 

Transferred to Co. K, Jan. 19, 1863. 

Andrew Wi Doe, of Manchester. 

Promoted to First Lieut. April 3, 1863. 

Cornelius Donohoe, of Manchester. 

Transferred to Co. F. 

Henry H. Emerson, of Dover. 

Transferred to Co. H. Wounded slightly May 13, 1864. Promoted to 
First Lieut. July 13, 1864. ' 

WilUam H. H. Black. 

Killed at Chapin's Farm, Va., Sept. 29, 1864. 

Co. D. Captains — "Warren M. Kelley, of Hooksett. 

Mustered out June 21, 1866. 

First Lieuts. — Charles Johnson, of Manchester. 

Resigned July 29, 1868. 

John A. Eaton, of Bradford. 

Wounded May 9, 1864. Died of wounds May 27, 1864. 



TENTH REGIMENT 425 

Frank H. Swett, of Andover. 

Honorably discharged Oct. 29, 1864. 

Second Lieuts. — Chas. H. Gardner, of Manchester. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Jan. 18, 1863. 

Jamea A. Sanborn, of Portsmouth. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Nov. 4, 1863. 

Daniel "W. Eussell, of IJ^ashua. 

Killed in action June 2, 1864. 

Co. E. — Captains— Aldrich B. Cook, of Andover. 

Resigned Jan. 9, 1868. 

Thomas C. Trumbull, of Manchester. 

Dismissed March 80, 1864. 

James A. Sanborn, of Portsmouth. 

Mustered out June 21, 1866. 

First Lieuts. — Wm. H. I>. Cochrane, of Goffstown. 

Appointed Adjutant Jan 1, 1863. 

Charlton "W. "Woodbury, of Wilmot. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Jan. 11, 1868. 

James A. Sanborn, of Portsmouth. 

Promoted to G&ptain Not. 23, 1864. 

Samuel L. Mitchell. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — C. "W. "Woodbury, of "Wilmot. 

Promoted to First Lieut. .Tan. 11, 1868. 

George A. Chase, of Andover. 

Promoted to First Lieut. June 9, 1868. 

Samuel L. Mitchell. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

Co. F. — Captains — John L. O'Brien, of Manchester. 

Wounded slightly June 3, 1864. Dismissed Feb. 9, 1866. 

George "W. Chase, of Andover. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — John Faxon, of Walpole. 

Honorably discharged July 3, 1864. 

Gilbert A. Tucker, of Andover. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — John C. Keenan, of Concord. 

Promoted to First Lieut. May 20, 1863. 

Cornelius Donohoe, of Manchester. 

Dismissed Not. 23, 1863. 

Frank H. Swett, of Andover. 

Promoted to First Lieut. July 13, 1864. 



426 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

Jolin P. O'Brien. 
Not mustered. Captured at Fair Oaks, Va., Oct. 27, 1864. Paroled. Pro- 
moted to First Lieut. Nov. 23, 1864. 

Co. G. — Captains^— George "W. Towle, of Portsmoutli. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Geo. E. Hodgdon, of Portsmouth. 

Resigned Feb. 14, 1863. 

Simon R. Marston, of Portsmouth. 

Promoted to Paymaster V. S. Army, April 3, 1863. 

George H. L. Head, of Hooksett. 

Promoted to Captain Nov. 23, 1864. 

Second Lieuts. — S. E. Marston, of Portsmouth. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Feb. 15, 1864. 

Alonzo L. Day, of Manchester. 

Honorably discharged April 21, 1864. 

Charles H. Hoyt. 

Wounded May 14, 1864. Died of wounds June 27, 1864. 

Co. H, — Captains — George H. Hubbard, of Manchester. 

Resigned June 9, 1863. 

Patrick Doyle, of Manchester. 
Wounded severely October 27, 1864. Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — ^Foster Kimball, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Quartermaster Nov. 22, 1862. 

Charles H. Gardner, of Manchester. 

Resigned March 17, 1863. 

George "W. Chase, of Andover. 
Transferred to Co. K. Promoted to Captain Feb. 9, 1865. 

Morris Mathon, of Hooksett. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — John Hubbard, of I^ew Ipswich. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Nov. 24, 1862. 

Ichabod S. Bartlett, of Manchester. 

Resigned Jan. 1, 1863. 

Alfred G. Simons, of Manchester. 

Promoted to First Lieut. June 1, 1865. 

Co. L — Captains-^Darius G. Harriman, of Farmington. 

Dishonorably discharged Jan. 16, 1868. 

John Hubbard of ISew Ipswich. 

Dishonorably (Uscharged May 20, 1864. 
Michael F. Corcoran, of Manchester. 
Captured at Fair Oaks, Va., Oct. 27, 1864. Exchanged. Mustered out 
June 21, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Eichard Cody, of Dover. 

Resigned Nov. 15, 1862. 



TENTH REOIMENT. 427 

John Hubbard, of New Ipswich.. 

Promoted to Captain Jan. 17, 1868. 

James Knott, of Dover. 
Promoted to First Lieut. Jan. 17, 1863. Killed at Cold Harbor, Va., Juno 
3, 1864. 

William P. "Williams, of Concord. 
Commission revoked. Dismissed for desertion as Second Lieut. Aug. 3, 1864. 

Second Lieuts. — James Knott, of Dover. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Jan. 17, 1868. 

William P. Williams, of Concord. 

Wounded slightly July 3, 1864. Promoted to First Lieut. July 18, 1864. 

Co. K. — Captains — James Madden, of Manchester. 

Killed in action June 16, 1864. 

John Keenan, of Concord. 

Gaptat«d at Fair Oabs, Va., Oct. 27, 1864. Exchanged. Mustered out 
June 21, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — ^Patrick Doyle, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Captain June.9, 1863. 

Michael T. H. Maguire, of Manchester. 

Transferred to Co. G. Dismissed Jan. S, 1864. 

Lawrence F. Larkin, of Manchester. 
Wounded severely May 9, 1864. Wounded severely Oct. 27, 1864. Pro- 
moted to Capt^ Nov. 28, 1864. 

Isaac C. Richardson, of Nashua. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

Second Lieut. — ^L. F. Larkin of Manchester. 

Promoted to First Lieut Jan. 10, 1864. 



GENERAL MICHAEL T. DONOHOE. 

General Donohoe was born at Lowell, Mass., Nov. 22, 
1838. He was educated at the Lowell schools and at 
the College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, Mass. At 
the outbreak of the rebellion he was engaged in business 
at Manchester, where he had great influence with the 
Irish population. When the Third Regiment was called 
for he enlisted a full company, and went with it to Con- 
cord, early in August, 1861. This company was lettered 
C, and he was commissioned Captain of it. He went 
with the regiment to the field, and participated in nearly 
all its marches and battles, showing much true patri- 
otism and valor on all occasions, and was often com- 
mended for his conduct as an officer. 



428 THE QREAT REBELLION. 

Wheii in the Bummer of 1862 three hunelred thousand 
troops were called for by the President, to meet the 
emergency in which the country was placed by the 
defeats of the Union army, it was determined by the 
Governor and Council to raise an Irish regiment in this 
State, and it was designated the Tenth Infantry. Cap- 
tain Donohoe, who had distinguished himself as an 
oflB-cer in the Third Regiment, was offered the command 
of the Tenth, and signified his willingness to accept 
the responsible position. He was commissioned Colonel 
on the 6th of August, 1862, and soon came home and 
assumed the duties. Colonel Ponohoe, Lieut. Colonel 
Coughlin, also of Manchester, and others who had been 
commissioned in the Tenth Regiment, addressed meet- 
ings of citizens in that city and other places, appealing 
especially to their fellow countrymen, and very soon 
secured the requisite number of men — Manchester 
furnishing the larger part of six companies. The re^- 
ment was fully organized, mustered into the United 
States service, and left the State for the seat of war in 
September — but little more than a month after Colonel 
Donohoe received his commission. He went with his 
regiment to the field, and its history, with that of the 
Third, go far toward making up Colonel Donohoe's 
personal military record. 

In the summer of 1863, and during much of the 
time afterward, until the close of the war, Colonel 
Donohoe was in command of his brigade. He was 
wounded severely on the 29th of September, 1864, when 
in command of the skirmish line in the assault on Fort 
Harrison. Early in the day his horse was shot under 
him. He showed great coolness and bravery until 
wounded late in the day. He was appointed Brigadier 
General United States Volunteers, by brevet, for gallant 
conduct in the field, to date from March 13, 1865. His 
regiment was among the first to enter the city of Bic^- 



TENTH REGIMENT. 429 

mond, on the 3d of April, 1865. Three months and a 
half afterward the Tenth, Twelfth and Thirteenth ITew 
Hampshire Regiments were mustered out of the service, 
formed a brigade, and came home under command of 
Brevet Brigadier General Donohoe. 

Soon after the close of the war General Donohoe was 
appointed to a responsible position on the Concord Rail- 
road. In 1869 he was nominated by the Democratic 
party as their candidate for one of the board of Railroad 
Commissioners, and was re-nominated in 1870. He is a 
gentleman of ability and influence, and enjoys the 
respect of a large circle of acquaintances. 

The Tenth Regiment left camp at Manchester on the 
22d of September, 1862, and after a journey interspersed 
with pleasurable incidents and painful accidents, arrived 
at "Washington on the 25th. At Worcester, Mass., the 
citizens gave the regiment a bountiful collation, and at 
Philadelphia they met with an enthusiastic reception 
and partook of a nice supper at the famous and never to 
be forgotten Cooper Refreshment Saloon. Between 
Philadelphia and Baltimore one of the cars ran off the 
track and private John Cole, of Company K, was thrown 
from the train and killed. Between Baltimore and 
"Washington the train on which the Tenth was embarked 
collided vsdth toother train from Washington, crushing 
several of the cars and injuring a number of the men — 
some fataUy. The engineer of the colliding train was 
suspected of having been the wanton cause of the dis- 
aster, which enraged the soldiers, who were with diffi- 
culty restrained from shooting him on the spot. He 
was finally sent to Baltimore under arrest. 

On the 30th of September the regiment embarked on 
cars and proceeded to Frederick City, Md., where it 
remained until the 4th of October, when it moved to 
Sandy Hook, opposite Harper's Ferry, and went into 



430 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

camp on Maryland Heights. Two days afterward the 
regiment moved over the mountains into Pleasant 
Valley, and was incorporated into the Army of the 
Potomac. It was assigned to the First Brigade, Third 
Division, Mnth Corps, the other re^ments in the bri- 
gade being the Ninth, Eighty-ninth, and Hundred and 
Third New York. 

The last of October the Army of the Potomac moved. 
The Ninth Corps -crossed the mountains, through Knox- 
ville, and thence to Wheatland and Gaskin's Mills, 
where a halt of about a vceek was made. On the 15th 
the march was again resumed, and while a part of the 
Ninth Corps was crossing the north fork of the Rappa- 
hannock the rebel General Early made an attempt to 
cut off one of the wagon trains, when a short artillery 
engagement ensued, during which the Tenth was placed 
in support of one of the batteries. This was its first 
experience under fire. The corps passed Warrenton 
Junction, Bealton, Elk Run, Hartwood Church, arriving 
at Falmouth on the 19th, where the regiment passed a 
most uncomfortable night in the mud and water, which 
did not admit of laying down or sleeping. 

The Tenth participated in the disastrous battle of 
Fredericksburg. At daylight on the morning of the 
13th of Decetnber, Colonel Donohoe was ordered to 
take his regiment to the front, where it relieved Haw- 
kins' Zouaves, then on picket. Five companies were 
thrown forward as skirmishers, under cover of a dense 
fog, which concealed their movements. At about eight 
o'clock this cleared away before the rising sun, and 
revealed the close proximity of the men of the two con- 
tending armies. -The rebels opened with a hot musketry 
fire, to which the Tenth promptly replied. This opened 
the ball between the infantry on that part of the line. 
The remaining five companies were brought up as a 
support, and the line was ordered forward. The rebel 



' TENTH BEQIMENT. 431 

skirmisliers withdrew and the Tenth occupied the rail- 
road. About this time the main attacking column 
issued from the city and advanced to the assault of 
Marye's Heights, when commenced a most terrific 
battle, the details of which are given in connection 
with other regiments. During the battle the Tenth 
bravely held its position, preventing the enemy from 
bringing down his light batteries on the flank and 
enfilading the assaulting lines. Just before dark the 
remainder of the brigade, which had thus far been held 
in reserve, near the river, was brought up, and with the 
Tenth, ordered in to make a last charge against that 
position where the regiment had all day long witnessed 
the slaughter of men who had been sacrificed in the 
fiitile attemps to carry it. The Ifinth New York, whose 
position was on the right of the line, failed to come up, 
and to the Tenth New Hampshire fell that place. Before 
the line was fairly ready for the assault, darkness began 
to cover the field, and amid the deepening gloom, ren- 
dered still deeper by the smoke of battle which lowered 
over the scene, the brigade moved across the plain in 
good order, and the Tenth entered with spirit upon its 
first battle and first charge. Moving in quick time 
until they began to draw the fire of the enemy's bat- 
teries, they then sprang forward at a double quick, 
cheering as they went. They struggled over fences, 
through a deep ditch, and coming upon the solid 
ground beyond, were met by the fierce discharge of 
thousands of rifles, and the buUets whistled over their 
heads and through their ranks, while the batteries 
increased their fixe of grape and canister. On the^ 
went until in the gathering darkness the rebel muskets 
seemed to flash in their very faces. Eegiments mingled 
together in confusion, and, unable to see or hear, the 
line became broken and disorganized, and they were 
forced to retire. A short distance to the rear the Tenth 



432 TEE QBE AT REBELLION. 

and Thirteentlj New Hampshire wfere re-formed, but 
the attack was not renewed, and the battle of Fred- 
ericksburg ended with a rebel victory. The dead of 
the iN^ew Hampshire regiments were found nearer the 
rebel lines than any other of the army. So uncertain 
was the aim of the rebels, that under all this terrible 
fire, both of musketry and artillery, the loss of the 
Tenth was only three officers wounded, and fifty enlist- 
ed men killed and wounded. 

During the months of January and February, 1863, 
the health of the regiment was exceedingly bad, and for 
a long time there was an average of more than one 
death per day. On the 5th of February Colonel Dono- 
hoe started for home on a leave of absence, and the 
command of the regiment devolved on Lieut. Colonel 
Coughlin. On the 9th the Ninth Corps embarked and 
proceeded to Newport News. Company H was detailed 
as guard to the headquarters of General "W. F. Smith, 
who was at that time in command of the corps. On the 
25th a grand review was held by Major General Dix, 
then in command of the Department, in which the 
Tenth was conspicuous for its fine appearance and 
correct marching. 

On the 14th of March the Tenth sailed for Norfolk, 
and from there proceeded by rail to Suffolk, to reinforce 
the troops there who were threatened with an attack 
from the enemy. Three days after arrival Assistant 
Surgeon Harwood died, after a sudden illness. He was 
very much respected and beloved by the men, and his 
death was felt to be a calamity to the regiment. Colo- 
nel Donohoe returned and assumed command. On the 
16th of April the Tenth, with t£ree companies of the 
Thirteenth and a section of the Second Wisconsin Bat- 
tery, the whole force commanded by Colonel Donohoe 
proceeded down the river to Fort Connecticut. At 
night Colonel Donohoe, with a hundred and fi% men, 



TENTH REGIMENT. 43B 

made a reconnoissance across the river, which developed 
the enemy in heavy force. On the 19th all the compar 
nies not engaged on other duty, commanded by Captain 
George W. Towle, marched to Council's Landing on the 
Nansemond, and joined an expedition under Colonel 
"Ward, of the Eighth Connecticut. The force crossed 
the river and captured a battery of light guns, two brass 
howitzers, and about two hundred prisoners. The next 
morning a portion of the Tenth advanced and dislodged 
some rebel sharpshooters from a cluster of buildings, 
burned the houses, and captured two prisoners. The 
place was evacuated thfe same afternoon, the retreat 
being covered by the Tenth, which lost several men 
captured. The expedition, having captured the guns 
and foiled the plans of the enemy, was considered a 
success. The siege of Suffolk continued about four 
weeks, and was a period of extremely hard work to the 
troops engaged; and when it was raised the entire 
army at that place was nearly worn out by the severity 
of its labors. 

On the 3d of May the rebels retreated across the 
Blackwater, closely followed by the Union forces, who 
captured many prisoners. A week later the Tenth and 
Thirteenth Regiments were again brought together in 
the same brigade. On the 13th the Tenth moved to 
Bowers' Hill, eight miles, in the direction of Portsmouth, 
and was soon followed by all the troops, and Suffolk 
was abandoned. The division was under command of 
General Getty and marched to Portsmouth, from 
whence it embarked for Torktown, where it remained 
until the 26th of June, when the Tenth embarked and 
sailfed for White House' Landing, on the Pamunkey, 
where it arrived on the evening of the same day. 

On the 7th of July, Colonel Donohoe, who had been 
in command of the brigade for some weeks, was relieved 
by the return of Colonel Dutton, of the Twenty-first 



434 TEE GEEAT REBELLION. 

Connecticut, the ranking Colonel, and the former was 
sent sick to Norfolk. On the 10th the division marched 
through "Williamsburg, and arrived at Yorktown on 
the afternoon of the same day, where it rested until 
the 12th, when it marched to Hampton and embarked 
for Portsmouth, which place it had left twenty-one days 
before, and the Tenth found their tents still standing 
and the camp undisturbed. Their marches during this 
time had some of them been very severe, and the 
weather had been so hot that some of the men were 
sun-struck. 

About the middle of July General John G. Foster, 
a native of New Hampshire, assumed command of the 
Department. On the 30th the camp was removed to 
Julian's creek — a tributary of the Elizabeth, where 
work on the fortifications was vigorously pressed for- 
ward. In September General Nagle assumed command 
of the District, reviewed the Tenth Regiment and gave 
them much credit for good appearance and proficiency 
in drill. On the 21st of this month and on the 4th of 
October, three hundred and thirty-five recruits joined the 
regiment, nearly all of whom were substitutes. The 
work on the defenses was completed in November, and 
the winter was spent in perfecting the regiment in drill. 

On the 19th of March, 1864, the Tenth Regiment 
left its camp at Julian's creek and moved to Great 
Bridge, about fifteen miles ; and on the 19th of April 
moved from there and joined General Butler's forces 
at Yorktown, which was preparing for an advance up 
the James river. The regiment was assigned to the 
Second Brigade, First Division of the Eighteenth 
Corps — ^the other regiments in the brigade being the 
One Hundred and Eighteenth New York, Eighth Con- 
necticut, and Thirteenth New Hampshire. The division 
was commanded by General "W. H. P. Brooks, and the 
brigade by General Hiram Bumham. 



TENTH BEOIMENT. 435 

On the 5tli of May, just as the Army of the Potomac 
had left'the Eapidan, and was fighting its way through 
the Wilderness, the army under General Butler started. 
The Tenth and Thirteenth New Hampshire embarked 
on board steamers and proceeded to Bermuda Hundred, 
where they arrived the same evening. The next day the 
troops advanced toward the Walthal Railroad, the Tenth 
heading the column of infantry. They had not pro- 
ceeded far before the cavalry, who were in advance, 
received a volley from the rebel infantry, posted in a 
dense swamp, which caused them to fall back in some 
confusion. Heavy skirmishing ensued, the enemy re- 
tiring slowly beyond the railroad. The Tenth kept 
up skirmishing in front, while a force was sent around 
to the right and succeeded, after considerable fighting, 
in gaining possession of the railroad. The regiment 
was under fire all day, and lost several men wounded. 

On the 9th another advance was made. The enemy 
was encountered at Arrow Hill and forced to retire 
near Swift creek. The enemy made an attack upon 
the Union forces after dark, but were met with such 
spirit as caused them to make a hasty and disorderly 
retreat. In this attack Lieut. John C. Eaton was mor- 
tally, and Lieut. L. F. Larkin severely wounded. A 
few enlisted men were more or less wounded, Lieut. 
Eaton was wounded in the leg. He refused to submit 
to amputation, and died of the wound. The next day 
the regiment tore up the railroad and bent the rails, 
and then returned to camp. On the 13th the Tenth 
was again engaged at a place called the Half Way 
House, on the Richmond and Petersburg turnpike. 
Major Angell was placed in command of the skirmish 
line, and while pushing the skirmishers forward, at 
about eleven o'clock at night, he was dangerously 
wounded, Lieut. H. J. Emerson and several enlisted 
men were wounded at the same time. Li the morning 



436 TSE GREAT REBELLION. 

a charge was made along the whole line upon the rebel 
works, from which the enemy retreated. Sergeant 
Charles H. Hoyt, of Company C, who had been com- 
missioned, though his commission had not reached the 
regiment, was mortally wounded, and died in field 
hospital. 

On the morning of the 16th, under cover of a dense 
fog, the enemy made a desperate attack upon the right of 
the Eighteenth Corps, which position was held by Gen- 
eral Heckman's brigade, taking it entirely by surprise 
and capturing many prisoners, among whom was Gen- 
eral Heckman himself. The rebels turned the flank 
of the corps, and swept every thing before them. "WTien 
the enemy arrived within easy range, a well-directed 
volley was opened on them, which was rapidly followed 
up by continued streams of fire, mowing the rebels 
down by scores, until at last, with lines utterly broken 
up, they retired. They repeatedly renewed the attack, 
but were as often repulsed with terrible slaughter. They 
made charge after charge upon that portion of the line 
held by the Tenth and Thirteenth New Hampshire regi- 
ments, but were each time driven back with heavy loss. 
A battery was finally brought up and an attempt made 
to shell them out, but it had fired hardly a dozen shots 
before the gunners were disabled by the New Hampshire 
boys, and the guns were silenced. Orders were sent 
to Lieut. Colonel Coughlin, commanding the Tenth, 
to -vyithdraw his regiment. He replied that a brigade 
further to the left, in the woods, was in danger of being 
cut off, and asked permission to hold his position until 
it could be extricated, which was granted. Lieut. Colo- 
nel Coughlin held the works for two hours, while the 
brigade in the woods was notified of their danger and 
marched out to the rear. The Tenth was retiring and 
was closely pressed by the enemy, when some of the 
men showed greater haste than was agreeable to the 



TENTH REGIMENT. 437 

commanding officer, and he peremptorily ordered a 
halt, about-faced his command, carefully right-dressed 
it, and coolly gave the order to fix bayonets. In 
their surprise the rebels forgot to fire, and the com- 
mand was quickly about-faced again, and double-quicked 
to the cover of the woods, before the enemy recovered 
sufficiently from his surprise to renew his fire. The 
Tenth rejoined its brigade and the whole force retired 
to Bermuda Hundred, three companies of the Tenth 
and one company from the Thirteenth holding the ene- 
my in check during the retreat. The casualties in this 
affair, which is known as the battle of Drury's Bluffy 
were slight^ owing to the fact that the regiihent fought 
mostly under cover. The losses in the whole move- 
ment were about fifty men killed and wounded. 

General Butler's army now took up its position on 
the line of the intrenchments extending from the James 
■ to the Appomattox, in front of and nearly parallel with 
which was the rebel line. Each line was constantly 
exposed to the fire of the other, and there were fre- 
quent alarms along the picket line. On the 26th of 
May a reconnoissance in force was made beyond Port 
Walthal, the Tenth forming a part of the support. 
Colonel Dutton, of the Twenty-first Connecticut, who 
commanded the brigade, was killed on the skirmish line. 
On the 31st of May the corps joined General Grant's 
army, which was face to face with the enemy at Cold 
Harbor. On the 1st of June the Tenth, though under 
fire and with the division charging the enemy, and 
driving them into^ their works, lost but one man 
killed and one wounded. Just before daylight the 
division moved near the enemy's works, and with plates, 
dippers and bayonets, the men dug for their protection 
a series of shallow rifle-pits, which were afterward made 
into a substantial line of works. When the rebels 
discovered this operation they opened fire, and many 



438 TEE QBEAT REBELLION. ■ 

of the men were wounded. Lieut. Daniel "W. Russell 
was shot through the head and instantly killed. He 
was a brave officer, and his loss was deeply mourned 
by the regiment. 

On the 3d of June occurred the sanguinary battle of 
Cold Harbor. The Tenth regiment was early and hotly 
engaged. It met the enemy's skirmishers and drove 
them at a double quick back to their rifle pits, and 
developing a line of heavy works nearly parallel to that 
occupied by the Union forces. "With a spirited cheer they 
rushed on, met by the most fearful fire of artillery and 
musketry they had ever encountered. In less than five 
minutes ninety officers and men of the regiment had 
fallen; yet the line pressed on, driving the rebels 
through their first line, and into a second. Taking 
position in the line abandoned by the enemy, the regi- 
ment at once opened fire, and held their place during 
the day. A correspondent, describing the battle wrote : 
" Troops never stood under a more hellish fire than was 
poured upon the Tenth New Hampshire on this day. 
Half of the trees were cut down by shells, and, falling 
upon the dead and wounded, mangled their bodies in a 
horrid manner. The bark was peeled fi-om the trees by 
bullets, and saplings, a few inches in diameter, by actual 
count, bore the marks of from fifty to a hundred bullets 
each. The bodies of the dead were used for breast- 
works, and whole platoons were swept away by the 
awful fire of grape and canister. Imagination stands 
appalled in the endeavor to paint the horrors of that 
day." Lieut. James Knott, of Company I, was killed, 
and Captain John L. O'Brien, Adjutant J. J. Donohoe, 
and Lieut. "William P. "Williams were wounded. 

The regiment remained at the front, at Cold Harbor, 
until the 12th of June, losing men killed and wounded 
every day, when, with its corps it marched to "White 
House, and next day embarked on transports for Ber- 



TENTH BEQIMENT. 439 

muda Hundred, and thence crossed the Appomattox and 
inarched toward Petersburg. They encountered the 
enemy and drove them within a line of works which 
was gallantly charged and carried by the negro troops, 
and the rebels retired to their main line of defenses at 
Petersburg. In the afternoon the artillery opened upon 
the works a terrific fire, which was kept up about 
twenty minutes, when the assaulting column advanced, 
the Second Brigade being opposite Battery No. 5, as it 
was numbered by the rebels — the Thirteenth New Hamp- 
shire deployed as skirmishers. With the utmost gal- 
lantry the skirmish line charged on the enemy's rifle- 
pits, and in an instant more were scaling the ramparts 
of the fort, and captured nearly every man and all the 
guns in it. The rebels who escaped retired toward 
Petersburg, the whole line falling into the hands of the 
Union forces. 

On the 16th, three companies of the Tenth were 
ordered to dislodge the rebels, who, during the night, 
had occupied a ravine near the captured works. The 
enemy opened a galling fire,' and Captain James Madden, 
commanding the line, was killed with a bullet through 
the heart. He was a brave and noble officer, beloved and 
lamented by all. The ravine was carried by a furious 
charge, and many prisoners captured. The three com- 
panies took fifty-four men into the fight, nine of whom 
were killed or wounded. The prisoners captured con- 
siderably outnumbered the captors. The Eighteenth 
Corps returned to the defenses of Bermuda Hundred, 
and on the 21st again crossed the Appomattox, and took 
position in the trenches. 

On the 22d of August Lieut. Andrew "W. Doe was 
killed while on picket. On the 27th the corps was or- 
dered to the defenses of Bermuda, and the Tenth was 
placed on the extreme right, resting on James river. 
This was a comfortable, though an unhealthy, position, 



440 TEE QBEAT REBELLION. 

and nearly every man was attacked with cMlls and fever. 
On the loth of September, Colonel Donohoe, after a 
protracted absence, returned to the regiment, and Lieut. 
Colonel Coughlin was assigned to the command of the 
Fifth Maryland Veteran Volunteers, and afterward to a 
provisional brigade of new troops from Pennsylvania ; 
and was subsequently Provost Marshal of the Depart- 
ment of Virginia and North Carolina, including the 
Army of the James. 

FORT HARRISON. 

On the 28th of September the Army of the James 
marched to Aiken's Landing. About midnight the army 
crossed the river, the Tenth in advance, and before day- 
light a skirmish line was formed of the Tenth and 
Hundred and Eighteenth New York, and the advance 
was begun. At daylight the enemy's skirmishers were 
encountered and rapidly driven back. Colonel Donohoe, 
who commanded the skirmish line, had his horse shot 
under him. The enemy was driven three or four miles 
to the cover of his works on Chapin's Parm, where the 
main body of troops came up and formed in the edge of 
the wood for an assault upon Fort Harrison, a powerful 
work on the summit of a hill, three-quarters of a mile 
from the woods, the intervening slope being swept by 
the enemy's cannon. The First Division emerged from 
the woods and advancing toward the Fort, thirty pieces 
of Artillery opened on the columns, and rebel gunboats 
on the James threw their immense shells across its path. 
The division moved steadily on, and in quick time, the 
fast opening gaps quickly closed up, it marched well up 
to the fort, and, halting for a moment to gather for the 
blow, it sprang forward with defiant cheers, every step 
taken at the cost of scores of brave lives ; they gained 
the ditch, mounted the ramparts, and drove the enemy 



TENTH REOIMENT. 441 

from his guns, which were at once turned to the destruc- 
tion of those who had just used them with such deadly 
effect. All of the enemy's dead and wounded fell into 
the hands of the assilants, and many prisoners and guns 
were taken. General Burnham, commanding the brig- 
ade, was killed while working some of the captured 
guns. Later in the day another fierce fight occurred, in 
which Colonel Donohoe was severely wounded. The 
next day the enemy opened on the fort from all sides, 
the gunboats and mortar batteries joining in the bom- 
bardment. This was followed by an attempt to storm 
the fort. The advance was to certain defeat and terrible 
slaughter. Dead and disabled rebels strewed the field. 
N'ew and successive attempts were made to carry the 
works, followed by the same fearful carnage. Every 
advance was coolly repulsed, and the enemy abandoned 
the undertaking, how reluctantly. A skirmish line, com- 
posed of troops from the Tenth and Thirteenth, sallied 
forth after the routed rebels, and brought in about five 
hundred prisoners. The victory was complete and im- 
portant. The losses were far greater on the rebel than 
on the Union side. General Ord, commanding the corps, 
and General Stannard, commanding the division, were 
both wounded — ^the latter losing an arm. Thus the 
Tenth had lost its corps, division and brigade command- 
ers. Captain Caswell, who was in command of the regi- 
ment after Colonel Donohoe was wounded, was killed. 
He was a most brave and noble officer. The entire loss 
of the regiment was thirty-four killed and wounded, out 
of less than two hundred taken into the fight. 

On the 25th of October the Eighteenth Corps moved 
across the country to the Williamsburg road — the object 
being to turn the enemy's left. When near Fair Oaks 
the rebels came to a stand, and were driven by the 
skirmishers into their works. The Second Brigade, 
now reduced to about five hundred men, was ordered to 



442 THE ORE AT REBELLION. 

charge. It moved forward under the fire of artillery 
and musketry. It reached a position where to retreat 
or advance were alike impossible. Far from supports, 
and few to continue the assault, they were forced to lie 
down within a few yards of the enemy's works, and 
wait for darkness to cover their escape. The rebels, 
however, captured nearly the whole brigade before night 
came. Only two out of ten officers of the Tenth 
escaped, and seventy-four men were killed, wounded, or 
captured. To prevent the colors from falling into the 
hands of the enemy they were taken from the staffs. 
The State flag was destroyed, and the stars and stripes 
were- wrapped around the body of Sergeant John H. 
Durgin, who was afterward taken prisoner, and died at 
Salisbury, but the flag was never heard from. Lieut. 
Henry H. Emerson was killed; Captains John C. Kee- 
nan and M. F. Corcoran were captured, and Captains 
Crowley and Doyle, and Lieuts. Larkin, Mitchell, and 
Tucker were wounded. Nearly all the men who were 
captured died in the' rebel prison at Salisbury. The 
next morning the troops reached camp. They remained 
in the lines before Richmond all winter, employed in 
the usual duties of troops before the enemy. 

At the final advance on Richmond, in April, 1865, 
the Tenth was among the first to enter the city. It 
remained at Manchester, opposite Richmond, on provost 
guard duty, until about the 21st of June, when it was 
musteVed out of the United States service and in com- 
pany with the Twelfth and Thirteenth Few Hampshire, 
forming a brigade, under command of Brevet Brigadier 
General Donohoe, it started for home, arriving in Bos- 
ton on the 25th. At Nashua, Manchester and Concord 
the brigade was cordially received and handsomely 
entertained by the citizens. At Concord the men 
received their pay and final discharge. 

Many officers were detailed from this regiment for 



TENTS REGIMENT. 443 

important and honorable staff and other duty, though 
the promotions from it were not so numerous as from 
some other ones which went from the State. The regi- 
ment was largely composed of foreigners, who leave 
a record highly creditable for patriotism, bravery and 
good conduct; those who survive are entitled to the 
gratitude of the State and nation ; and its dead upon 
many hard fought fields, in rebel prisons, and in hos- 
pitals, to an honorable record in the history of the great 
rebellion. 



444 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

ELEVENTH REGIMENT. 



^e Eleventh Regiment was enlisted in August, and 
its muster into the United States service was completed 
early in September, 1862. It rendezvoused at Con- 
cord. It was raised under the same call for troops as 
the Tenth, and the men composing it were paid the same 
bounties. The following were the officers of this 
regiment, with their official record, during the term of 
service : 

FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS. 

Colonel — "Walter Harriman, of Warner. 

Captured May 6, 1864. Exchanged Sept. 12, 1864. Appointed Brigadier 
General U. S. V., by brevet, for gallant conduct during the war, to date from 
March 13, 1865. Mustered out as Ojlonel June 4, 1865. 

Lieut. Colonels — Moses N. Collins, of Exeter. 

Killed in action May 6, 1864. 

Leander W. Cogswell, of Henniker. 

Not mustered. Honorably discharged as Captain April 26, 1865. 

Majors — ^Moses N. Collins, of Exeter. 

Promoted to Lieut. Colonel Sept. 9, 1862. 

Evarts "W. Earr, of Littleton. 

Mustered out June 4, 1865. 
Adjutants — Charles E. Morrison, of !N"ashua. 

Wounded severely May 12, 1864. Honorably discharged Sept. 9, 1864. 

William A. Nason, of New London. 

Not mustered. Mustered out as First Lieut. June 4, 1865. 

Quartermasters — James F. Briggs, of Hillsborough. 

Honorably discharged Aug. 1, 1863. 

Gilman B. Johnson, of Epping. 

Mustered out June 4, J.865. 
Surgeons — John S. Ross, of Somersworth. 

Honorably discharged for disability Dec. 7, 1864. 
John A. Hayes, of Concord. 

Mustered out June 4, 1865. 
Assistant Surgeons — John A. Hayes, of Concord. 

Promoted to Surgeon Jan. 2, 1865. 



ELEVENTH REGIMENT. 445 

Edward R. HutcMns, of Concord. 

Bedgned Deo. 26, 1862. 

John C. "W. Moore, of Concord. 

Mustered oat Oct. Il,''l864. 
Charles M. Jones. 

Mustered out June 4, 1866. 

Chaplains — ^Frank K. Stratton, of Hampton. , 

Kesigned May 6, 1863. 

Edward T. Lyford, of Deerfield. 

Resigned May 13, 1866. 

Sergeant Majors — Josiah W. Taylor. 

Wounded severely May 6, 1864 Died of disease March 18, 1865. 
Jonathan T. Williams, of Sutton. 

Mustered out June 4, 1866. 

Quartermaster Sergeant — ^Henry L. Colby, of Warner. 

Must^«d out June 4, 1866. 

Commissary Sergeant — ^William S. Carter, of Warner. 

Mustered out June 4, 1866. 
Hospital Stewards — Charles M. Jones. 

Promoted to Assistant Surgeon Jan. 2, 1866. 
George P. Ladd, of Deering. 

Mustered out June 4, 1865. 

Principal Musician — Andrew J, Coffin, of Epping. 

Mustered out June 4, 1866. 

COMPANY OFFICERS. 

Co. A. — Captains — ^Horace C. Bacon, of Epping. 

Wonnded-Dec. 13, 1862. Honorably discharged June 11, 1864, 

J. Charles Currier, of Derry. 

Wounded severely Sept. 30, 1864. Honorably discharged Jan. 18, 1866. 

Charles E. Frost, of Hampstead. 

Mustered out June 4, 1866. 

First Lieuts. — George K". Shfepard, of Epping. 

Wounded Dec. 13. 1862. Promoted to Captain May 6, 1864. 

Charles Davis, jr., of Warner. 

Promoted to Captain Sept. 20, 1864. 

Charles E. Bartlett. 

Mustered out June 4, 1866. 

Second Lieuts. — Gilman B. Johnson, of Epping. 

Promoted to Quartermaster, April 22, 1864. 

Charles E. Bartlett. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Feb. 17, 1866. 



446 THE ORE AT REBELLION. 

Co. B, — Captains — Sewell D. Tilton, of Raymond. 

Wounded Beverely May 30, 1864. Mustered out June 4, 1865. 
First Lieuts. — ^Isaac H. Morrison, of Deering, 

Wounded slightly Dec. 13, 1862. Honorably discharged Sept 3, 1864. 

Merrill Johnson, of Deering. 

Mustered out June 4, 1866. 

Second Lieuts. — Joseph H. Cram, of Deering. 

Discharged Feb. 5, 1864. 

John E. Cram, of Raymond. 

Wounded severely May 12, 1864. Honorably discharged on account of 
wounds Oct. 19, 1864. 

George "W. Caswell, of South E^ewmarket. 

Wounded July 30, 1864. Not mustered. Discharged for disability at 
Concord, May 20, 1865. 

Co. C. — Captain — ^Hollis O. Dudley, of Manchester. 

Wounded sUghtly May 6, 1864. Mustered out June 4, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Joseph B. Clark, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Captain May 1, 1863. 

Jeremiah D. Lyford, of Manchester. 

Died of disease Dec. 9, 1864. 
Charles C. Page, of Candia. 
Wounded severely June 2, 1864. Transferred frqm Co. I. Not mustered. 
Unable to accept on account of wounds. Mustered out as Sergeant Ang. 28,1865. 

Will C. Wood, of Lyme. 

Transferred from Co. H. Mastered out June 4, 1868. 

Second Lieuts. — T. P. Heath, of Manchester. 

Resigned Aug. 8, 1863. 
L-a G. Wilkins, of Manchester. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Nov. 5, 1864. 
Co. D. Captains — Leander W. Cogswell, of Henniker. 

Promoted to Lieut. Colonel Aug. 20, 1864. 

Charles Davis, Jr., of Warner. 
Wounded severely Sept. 80, 1864. Not mustered. Honorably discharged as 
First Lieut. Jan. 20, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Thomas L. Sanborn, of Henniker. 

Resigned Feb. 28, 1863. 
David C. Harriman, of Warner. 

Resigned June 27, 1863. 
Joseph N". Modica, of Henniker. 

Appointed Captain U. S. V., by brevet, for gallant and meritorious conduct 
before Petersburg, Va., to date from ApiU 2, 1865. Mustered out as First 
Lieut. June 4, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — ^David C. Harriman, of Warner. 

Promoted to First Lieut Feb. 27, 1868. 

Charles Davis, Jr., of Warner. 

Promoted to First Lieut July 25, 1864. 



ELEVENTH KEGIMENT. 447 

Co. E. — Captains — Amos B. Shattuck, of Manchester. 

Wounded Deo. 13, 1862. Died of wounds Deo 17, 1862. 

Arthur C. Locke, of Epsom. 

Wounded Sept 30, 1864. Mustered out June 4, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Arthur C. Locke, of Epsom. 

Promoted to Captain Dec. 18, 1862. 

Henry G. Dillenhack, of Derry. 

Honorably discharged July 22, 1864. 

Charles E. Frost, of Hampstead. 

Promoted to Captain Feb. 17, 1865. 

Solomon Dodge, Jr., of New Boston. 

Mustered out June 4, 1865. 

Second Lieut. — Oharles E. Frost, of Hampstead. 

Wounded Nov. 19, 1863. Promoted t» First Lieut. July 22, 1864. 

Co. F. — Captains — Samuel M. Carr, of New London. 

Besigned Jan. 29, 1863. 

Charles Woodward, of New London. 

Honorably discharged June 23, 1864. 

Orlando W. Dimick, of Lyme. 

Mustered out June 4, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Austin W. Messer, of New London. 

Discharged for disability Sept. 29, 1862. 

Hiram K. Little, of Sutton. 

Wounded. Died of wounds at David's Island, N. Y., July 4, 1864. 

William A. Nason, of New London. 

Promoted to Adjutant Dec. 1, 1864. 

R. Baxter Brown, of Candia. 

Transferred to Co. I. 

Second Lieuts. — Hiram K. Little, of Sutton. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Jan. 30, 1863. 

E. Freeman Sanborn, of Springfield. 

Promoted to First Lieut. July 25, 1864. 

Co. G. — Captains — Ceorge E. Pingree, of Lisbon. 

Honorably discharged to accept appointment in V. R. C, April 30, 1864. 

J. Leiioy Bell, of Haverhill. 
Wounded July HO, 1864. Wounded Sept. 30, 1864. Mustered out June 
4, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — ^Arthur E. Hutchins, of Bath. 

Killed in action May 6, 1864. 

L. Newell Sawyer, of Dover. 

Promoted to Captain Sept. 1, 1864. 

Ira C Wilkins, of Manchester. 
Wounded April 2, 1865. Appointed Captain U. S. V., by brevet, for 
gallant and meritorious conduct in the assault before Petersburg, 7a,, to data 
ftom April 2, 1865. Mustered out June 4, 1865. 



448 THE a BEAT REBELLION. 

Second Lieut. — J. LeEoy Bell, of Haverfjill, 
Wounded aUghtly May 12, 1864. Wounded dightly June 2, 1864. Pro- 
moted to Captain July 22, 1864. 

Co. H.— Captains — Convers G. Morgan, of Enfield. 

Dismissed April 18, 1863. 

Joseph B. Clark, of Manchester. 
Wounded severely May 6, 1864. Mustered out June 4, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Orlando W. Dimick, of Lyme. 

Promoted to Captain July 22, 1864. 

Frank S. Bean, of Enfield. 

Transferred to Co. I, Sept. 23, 1864. 

Will C. Wood, of Lyme. 

Transferred to Co. L 
Second Lieuts. — ^Allen H. George, of Canaan. 

Honorably discharged May 23, 1864. 

Frank S. Bean, of Enfield. 

Promoted to First Lieut. July 25, 1864. 

Will C. Wood of Lyme. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Jan. 2, 1865. 

Co. L — Captains — ^William R. Patten, of Candia. 

Honorably discharged April 20, 1864. 

George IN". Shepard, of Epping. 
Wounded severely June 2, 1864. Mustered out June 4, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — John K. Cilley, of Exeter. 

Promoted to Captain and A. Q. M. C S. V. April 7, 1864. 

J. Charles Currier, of Derry. 

Promoted to Captain June 28, 1864. 

E,. Freeman Sanborn, of Springfield. 

Honorably discharged Aug. 9, 1864. 

Frank S. Bean, of Enfield. 

Transferred from Co. H Sept 23, 1864. Wounded Sept. SO, 1864. Died of 
Wounds Nov. 25, 1864. 

Charles C. Page, of Candia. 

Transferred to Co. C. 

R. Baxter Brown, of Candia. 

Transferred from Co. F. Mustered out June 4, 1865. 
Second Lieuts. — J. Charles Currier, of Derry. 
Wounded severely May 6, 1864. Promoted to First Lieut. May 11, 1864. 
R. Baxter Brown, of Candia. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Dec. 5, 1864. 

Co. K. — Captains — ^Nathaniel Lowe, jr., of Dover. 

Promoted to Captain and A. Q. M. U. S. V. June 16, 1364. 

L. Newell Sawyer, of Dover. 

Mustered out June 4, I8616. 



ELEVENTH BEQIMENT. 449 

First Lieuts. — ^B. Prank Eackley, of Dover. 

Resigned Dea. 22, 1862. 
Henry W. Twombly, of Dover. 

Beeigned July 19, 1868. 

Charles E. Everett, of Dover. 

Ptomoted to Captain May 15. 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — Henry "W. Twombly, of Dover. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Sec. 24, 1863. 

L. Ifewell Sawyer, of Dover. 

Wounded slightly June 16, 1864. Promoted to First Lieut. July 25, 1864. 

George P. Demerritt, of Durham. 

Not mustered. Mustered out as Sergeant June 4, 1866. 

GENERAL WALTER HARRIMAN. 

General Harriman was born at Warner, in Merrimack 
County, New Hampshire, where he has always resided. 
He received a good public school and academic educa- 
tion in Warner and other places. In his early days he 
taught school considerably, and thus spent one year in 
the State of New Jersey. At the age of twenty years — 
without any especial preparation and without consulta- 
tion with a single clergyman — ^he commenced preaching, 
and was known- for years throughout the State as one 
of its most eloquent and stirring preachers of the 
TJniversalist doctrines. He subsequently became engag- 
ed in trade, and then interested himself in the political 
affairs of the state and nation, and abandoned the sacred 
desk altogether. In 1849 he was elected a representa- 
tive in the State Legislature from the town of Warner, 
and was re-elected in 1850. He often engaged in 
debates in the House, and took a leading position. In 
June, 1863, he was elected State Treasurer, and was re- 
elected in 1854, serving the State in this responsible 
position to the acceptance of all. In 1856 he was 
appointed by President Pierce a Commissioner to clas- 
sify and appraise Indian Lands in Kansas Territory, 
which duty he performed with great care and faithful- 



460 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

ness, satisfying all parties interested. In 1858 General 
Harriman was again elected to the popular branch of 
the Legislature from the town of Warner, and was a lead- 
ing member on the Democratic side of the House. In 
1859 he was elected to the State Senate from the Eighth 
District, and was re-elected in 1860. During all these 
years that General Harriman had given attention to po- 
litical matters he was known not only in New Hampshire 
but other states as one of the most able and effective 
speakers in the party to which he had up to this time 
belonged. He had at different times spoken upon state 
and national politics in every county and almost every 
considerable town in the State, and in some of them 
several times. 

In the spring of 1861 General Harriman became 
editor of the Union Democrat, at Manchester, and bold- 
ly and fearlessly took and ably maintained ground in 
favor of the national government and the administration 
of Abraham Lincoln, so far as its war policy was concern- 
ed. The principles then and subsequently espoused and 
advocated by him were so much at variance with those 
entertained by the body of the party with which he had 
always acted and labored so earnestly, and which had 
honored him by appointments and elections to places of 
trust and profit, as to occasion an estrangement;, and 
from that time he has acted with the national adminis- 
tration and the Republican party. In August, 1862, he 
was appointed Colonel of the Eleventh New Hampshire 
Volunteers, immediately set about addressing public 
meetings, and raised his regiment in a few days. He 
went to the field with his regiment, and was with it 
most of the time until the close of the war, except four 
months that he was in the hands of the enemy as a 
prisoner. He was captured at the battle of the Wilder- 
ness, on the 6th of May, and was not exchanged until 
the 12th of September, 1864. He was one of the num- 



ELEVENTH REGIMENT. 451 

ber of Union officers drafted at Macon, Georgia, to be 
kept in prison in that part of Charleston most exposed 
by the bombardment of the city from Morris Island by 
the Union forces. He and other Union officers were 
kept in this most perilous situation for seven weeks, but 
fortunately the building in which they were confined 
was unharmed. 

Colonel Harriman was with his regiment in the siege 
of Petersburg, and when preparations were made for 
the final assault, which was rendered unnecessary by the 
evacuation of the city by the enemy, he was in command 
of a brigade of nine regiments, and thus on the 3d of 
April, 1865, marched over the rebel works and into 
Petersburg on the heels of Lee's flying army. He was 
appointed Brigadier General, by brevet, "for gallant 
conduct during the war, to date from March 13, 1865." 
He saw the rebellion snuffed out, and came home with 
his regiment. In June, 1865, General Harriman w^s 
elected Secretary of State, and was re-elected in 1866. 

In January, 1867, General Harriman was nominated 
as the Republican candidate for Governor, and after a 
sharp and decisive contest — he meeting in joint debate 
the opposing candidate, Hon. John G. Sinclair, — ^was 
elected by a handsome majority. He was re-elected in 
1868, after a most severe contest, receiving a larger vote 
than any candidate for any office had received before, or 
has received since, in the State. During the two years 
that he was Governor he discharged the somewhat ardu- 
ous and difficult duties of the office in a most able and 
acceptable manner. In 1869 Governor Harriman was 
appointed Naval Officer at Boston, by President Grant, 
which position he now holds. 

In the fall of 1864, while home from his imprison- 
ment, General Harriman stumped the country for the 
re-election of President Lincoln, with a success equal, 
at least, to that of any other speaker in that campaign. 



4S2 THE GREAT BEBELLION. 

He again stumped the country from Maine to Indiana, 
for General Grant, in 1868, witt most flattering results. 
He is emphatically a man of the people. His command- 
ing figure — ^being six feet two inches tall — ^fine voice 
and earnest manner, and his' perfect familiarity with all 
the political issues of the time, combine to make him 
one of the most popular and effective speakers in the 
country. Such is his popularity as a man that he is said 
never to have been defeated when a candidate for any 
office. 

LIEUT. COLONEL MOSES N. COLLINS. 

Lieut. Colonel Collins was bom at Brentwood, Rock- 
ingham County, E'ew Hampshire, in April, 1820. He 
received a thorough academic education at Gilmanton 
and Hampton Falls, and subsequently for several years 
was engaged in teaching in the State of Maryland. 
Later he commenced the study of law in the office of 
Messrs. Murphy and Bartlett, of Epping, and completed 
his course in the office of Hon. Gilman Marston, at 
Exeter. He was admitted to the Rockingham County 
Bar in 1857, and immediately opened an office at Exeter, 
where he soon made himself known as an able, indus- 
trious and successful lawyer. He was elected a member 
of the popular branch of the l^ew Hampshire Legisla- 
ture from Brentwood, in 1855, and from Exeter in 
1861 and 1862. 

In the summer of 1862, after the disastrous defeat 
of the TFnion arms in the second battle of Bull Run ; 
the uncertain results of the Peninsular campaign, and 
the national existence seemed trembling in the balance, 
an appeal was made to the patriotism of every Ameri- 
can to rush to the rescue of the Government from its 
imperiled condition. Lieut. Colonel Collins was one 
of those who regarded the perpetuity of the constitution 



ELEVENTH REGIMENT. 453 

and laws as paramount to every other consideration, 
and accordingly offered his services, and his life, if it 
should be required, to the State authorities, in any 
capacity where he could do most toward crushing out the 
rebellion. He was accordingly tendered and accepted 
tihie appointment of Major of the Eleventh Regiment 
of Volunteer Infantry, and before the organization left 
the State was promoted to Lieut. Colonel. He bore 
a conspicuous part in nearly all the battles and skir- 
mishes in which the re^ment was engaged, being often 
in command, until that of the "Wilderness, on the 6th 
of May, 1864, when he was among the killed. While 
gallantly leading his men in a charge upon the enemy, 
he fell, with a musket ball through the head^a noble 
sacrifice in a holy cause. 

The Eleventh Eegiment left Concord on the 11th of 
September, 1862, and arrived at Washington on the 
14th, and was brigaded with the Twenty-first Connecti- 
cut, and Thirty-seventh Massachusetts, under command 
of Brigadier General Henry S. Briggs, of Massachusetts, 
and constituted a part of Casey's reserved corps. Early 
in October the Eegiment marched to Pleasant Valley, 
Maryland, and was brigaded with the Thirty-fifth and 
Twenty-first Massachusetts, Fifty-first New York, and 
Fifty-first Pennsylvania, and was the Second Brigade, 
Second Division, Ninth Army Corps, the brigade com- 
mander being acting Brigadier General E. Ferrero. On 
the 27th of October the Army of the Potomac started in 
pursuit of General Lee's retreating army, the division 
to which the Eleventh belonged being in the advance. 
The enemy was closely pursued and driven from point 
to point, occasionally skirmishing, without any serious 
engagement, or the loss of any men to the regiment. 
They reached Falmouth, opposite Fredericksburg, on 
the 19th of November, and went into camp, where they 



454 THE QBE AT REBELLION. 

remained drilling and performing ordinary camp and 
picket duty, until they engaged in the 

BATTLE OF FREDBEIOKSBURG. 

The Eleventh Eegiment crossed the Rappahannock 
on the morning of the 12th of December. It was not 
put into the fight until about twelve o'clock on the 13th, 
when it was ordered to the railroad, and thence advanc- 
ed to the bottom of a slope across an open plain swept 
by the enemy's fire of infantry and artillery, with noth- 
ing to divert that fire, and two or three fences to impede 
the progress of the regiment and add to its exposure. 
The order to advance given by Colonel Harriman on 
the right and Major Farr on the left, was promptly 
obeyed, and they proceeded upon the double-quick to 
the point indicated, which was not more than twenty 
rods from the rebel intrenchments. The position was 
held by a few companies that had preceded the regiment. 
For nearly two hours they sustained a tremenduous fire 
from the enemy's strongholds, nearly alone. The enemy 
were well protected by their intrenchments, while the 
regiment was considerably below them and only partially 
protected when flat upon the ground, by the character 
of the slope. The men were ordered to lie down and 
load, and then stand up, take aim and fire. Some, 
however, were so eager for the fray and reckless of 
consequences, that they persisted in standing bolt up- 
right all the while. The enemy rushed down the slope 
several times as if to make a charge, but were met with 
terrific volleys from the Eleventh and repulsed. Every 
man stood firm and would not yield an inch. After 
the ammunition was nearly exhausted, only a few 
rounds being reserved for an emergancy, and when 
there were indications that they might be called upon 
to make or meet a charge, Colonel Harriman gave 



ELEVENTH REGIMENT. 455 

orders to fix bayonets. Some of the men by procuring 
ammunition from other regiments which had come up, 
and from the cartridge-boxes of the dead, kept up a 
conti""""= fl'-e. Regiment after regiment came up, 
and E tie raged, the fire of the enemy's musket- 

ry anvi «i uixic^y Jseing most murderous and terrific, until 
after dark, when the regiment was withdrawn. On a 
single acre, embracing the ground held by the New 
Hampshire Eleventh, as measured by those who after- 
ward went over to bury the dead, there were six 
hundred and twenty dead men. The conduct of the 
regiment on that day was the subject of universal 
commendation. The General in command, in an ad- 
dress said : "To the new troops who fought so nobly 
on the 13th, on their first battle-field, thanks are espe- 
cially due; they have every way proved themselves 
worthy to stand side by side with the veterans of the 
Second brigade." The N'ew Hampshire Eleventh were 
the only " new troops " in that brigade, and of course 
appropriated this high and well deserved compliment. 
In this battle the regiment had fourteen men killed, 
one hundred and fifty-six wounded and twenty-four 
missing. Of the latter some afterward came in ; some 
are supposed to have been killed, others were wounded 
or prisoners. Many died of wounds not supposed at 
the time to be fatal. Among these was Captain Amos 
B. Shattuck, an excellent oflicer and much esteemed 
man. 

The Eleventh Regiment remained at the heights of 
Strafford until the 11th of February, 1863, when with 
the rest of the corps they were at Newport News until 
the the 26th of March, and then went to Covington, 
Kentucky, to protect the people from guerrillas and 
drive out the rebel forces. They remained in the State, 
at different places until the 4th of June, when they 
were removed to Vicksburg. Here Colonel Harriman 



456 THE GREAT REBELLiaM. 

resided and Lieut. Colonel Collins assumed command 
of the regiment. 

After tlie surrender of Vicksburg, on the of 4th July, 
the Eleventh, with other troops started in pursuit of 
Johnston, the details of which movement are given iu 
the history of the Sixth Regiment. The regiment 
returned to Milldale where it remained until the 6th 
of August, suffering like the other regiments from the 
unhealthiness of the location. From there it proceeded 
to Cincinnati, where it arrived on the 14th, sadly re- 
duced in numbers and strength, by exposure to the 
malaria of the swamps in the vicinity of Vicksburg, 
The regiment marched over to Covington, Kentuclgp 
and remained there until the 26th <^f August, when 
they were successively at Nicholasville, Camp Parke, 
Crab Orchard and Loudon, Kentucky, and were then 
engaged in the 

SIEGE OF KNOXVILLB. 

After a very tedious march the Eleventh arrived at 
Knoxville on the 29th of October, and on the 17th of 
November were joined by General Bumside and his 
gallant little army of thirteen thousand men, who were 
closely followed by Longstreet with his excellent force, 
thirty thousand strong, and the siege of EJioxville com- 
menced. Trenches were thrown up; trees were felled ; 
forts were built ; dams were erected on the small creek 
separating the city proper from North Knoxville, and 
other preparations made for a defense of the city. The 
Eleventh shared all the hardships of the siege, short 
rations, etc., until the night of the 28th of November, 
when the rebels made an attack along the whole line, 
and skirmishing continued through the night. At five 
o'clock in the morning the enemy Opened with renewed 
vigor on the whole front, the object being to capture 



ELEVENTH REGIMENT. 457 

Port Sanders, at the west part of the town. Against 
this Longstreet hurled five thousand of his best troops, 
who were mowed down like grass by the Union battery. 
The enemy charged bravely, but it was only to meet 
sudden death. At seven o'clock the enemy, repulsed 
at every point, withdrew from the contest, leaving a 
thousand dead and wounded along the lines, while only 
ten or twelve men had been killed or wounded on the 
Union side. In a day or two news came of the victory 
at Chattanooga, and ringing cheers ran along the whole 
line. On the 5th of December the enemy commenced a 
retreat, and troops were sent in all directions in pursuit, 
who brought in a large number of prisoners. On the 
7th an advance was made up the valley, to force Long- 
street inside the Clinch mountains, and keep him from 
Cumberland Gap. After considerable skirmishing the 
Eleventh went into camp at Lee's Springs, and remained 
there three weeks. Rations had become very short, 
some days only a single ear of corn being issued to the 
men. The Eleventh had drawn very little of any kind 
of clothing ^or the five months that they had been in 
Tennessee, and they could be tracked by the marks of 
bloody feet while marching. Li lieu of tfhoes, green 
hides were issued to the men, of which they made 
moccasins. 

The last of February, 1864, Colonel Harriman rejoin- 
ed th^ regiment, and was received with much enthu- 
siasm. He had been re-commissioned as Colonel of the 
Eleventh, and had marched over the mountains, a dis- 
tance of two hurfdred and forty miles, in command of a 
detachment of six hundred recruits for that and other 
regiments. 

On the 18th of March orders were received to proceed 
to Annapolis, and the troops after long and tedious 
marching and railroad transportation, arrived there on 
the 7th of April and went into camp. The Ninth 



45S TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

Corps, under its favorite commander, General Bumside, 
was reorganized, enlarged and made to embrace four 
heavy divisions. Here they remained, drilling, clothing, 
arming and organizing until the 23d of April, when it 
began another march to the front. 

At the battle of the Wilderness, on the 6th of May 
the regiment was under fire nearly all day. At one 
o'clock the brigade ad.vanced through the "Wilderness 
in good order, in the face of a terrific fire. It passed 
one line of Union troops lying close to the ground, not 
engaged, came to another similar line and passed that 
also, when about three hundred Western men from 
that line sprang to their feet and rallied under the flag 
of the Eleventh and joined their fortunes with them. 
They pressed forward with spirit and carried two suc- 
cessive lines of the enemy's works at the point of the 
bayonet, driving the rebels from their last intrenchments 
in their front, and nearly out of the Wilderness. In 
this bloody engagement the regiment lost severely in 
both officers and men. Colonel Harriman was captured; 
Lieut. Colonel Collins was killed ; Captain J. B. Clark 
and Lieut. J. C. Currier were wounded severely, and 
Captain H. 0. Dudley slightly ; Lieut. Arthur E. Hutch- 
ins, serving on General Griffin's staff, was killed. The 
command of the regiment devolved on Captain Tilton. 

On the 12th of May occured the battle of Spottsyl- 
vania. The advance was commenced before daylight. 
The enemy's pickets were soon encountered. The 
Eleventh discovered a regiment of the enemy dressed 
in Union blue, detected their character, and at once 
attacked them. The fighting was terrific all along the 
lines, in which hundreds of pieces of artillery and 
thousands of muskets dealt death on every hand. 
Among the wounded in this fight were Adjutant Mor- 
rison and Lieut. John E. Cram, who at the time had 
the colors in his hand. The position of the Eleventh 



ELEVENTH BEOIMENT. 459 

was just to the left of where the Second Corps captured 
the rebel Greneral Bushrod Johnson and about five 
thousand prisoners. 

On the 16th, in a skirmish with the enemy the regi- 
ment lost several men killed and wounded. On the 
24th the regiment was under fire at North Anna river. 
On the 25th and 26th in picket and skirmish firing 
several of the men were wounded. 

At Cold Harbor, notwithstanding the regiment was 
not used in the offensive movement, the battle being 
fought mainly by the other troops, it was under fire and 
a number of its men were killed and wounded. Cap- 
tain Shepard, of Company I, being among the latter. 
On the 16th and 17th of June, in an engagement with 
the enemy before Petersburg, the regiment lost several 
prisoners, among them Lieut. Dimick. On the 21st 
Lieut. Little was mortally wounded while on the picket 
line. 

The months of June and July were spent by the 
regiment in the trenches before Petersburg, and on the 
30th of July took an active part in the celebrated battle 
of the " Mine." Captain Tilton, who had been in com- 
mand of the regiment from the 17th of June, was 
wounded early in the morning, and the command 
devolved on Captain Locke. The result of the attack 
was a repulse of the Union troops. The Eleventh occu- 
pied the " crater" most of the day, and lost heavily. 
The colors were twice lost and twice retaken, and were 
finally torn in two — ^the enemy retaining half while the 
remaining half was retained by the regiment. 

In September the regiment took part in the move- 
ments on the "Weldon railroad. On the 30th it moved 
to Poplar Grove Church, and was actively engaged at 
Pegram's Farm, where it lost heavily in killed and 
wounded. Among the wounded were Captains Locke — 
commanding the regiment — Currier and Bell, and 



460 TME aBEAT REBELLION. 

Lieuts. Davis, Brown and Bean — ^the latter mortally. 
Captain Shepard succeeded to the command of the regi- 
ment, which he held until the 1st of Octoher, when 
Captain Dudley returned from leave of absence and 
succeeded him. On the 27th the regiment took part in 
the engagement at Hatcher's Run, where it lost two 
men wounded and the Sergeant Major captured. On 
the Slst, by order of the commanding general, Captain 
Shepard again took command of the regiment. 

On the 2l8t of November Colonel Harriman returned 
to the regiment from his imprisonment, and was cor- 
dially welcomed. On the 29th the regiment, with the 
Ninth Corps, moved to the front of Petersburg, where 
it went into camp near Hancock Station, on the military 
railroad, and remained there until the 2d of April, 1865, 
engaged in picket duty, skirmishing and preparing for 
the last great struggle. On the 25th of March the 
enemy made a vigorous assault upon the lines of the 
Ninth Corps, at Fort Steadman, at daylight. They took 
the fort, but an hour later were driven back with great 
slaughter, and a loss of two thousand prisoners. 

On Sunday morning, April 2d, at three o'clock, the 
grand charge all along the lines, from the Appomattox 
river to Hatcher's Kun, was made. It was a great day 
and a great battle* The division commander having 
been wounded during the day, General Griffin assumed 
command, and Colonel Harriman took charge of the 
brigade, while the command of the Eleventh Eegiment 
devolved on Captain Dudley. About midnight it be- 
came evident that the rebels were evacuating Peters- 
burg. The city was on fire at three diflferent points. 
Half an hour before day, on the 3d, an advance was 
ordered. The troops moved cautiously at first, but 
hurriedly very soon, and sprang over the rebel breast- 
works with a shout of triumph. The brigade com- 
manded by Colonel Harriman, consisting of the Sixth, 



ELEVENTH REGIMENT. 461 

Ninth and Eleventh, and six other regiments, marched 
through Petersburg, with bands playing and banners 
flying. The common people, and especially the colored 
population, received the troops with demonstrations of 
joy, while most of the rich, aristocratic, original rebels 
were sour and glum. Secession was dead", and this 
latter class distinctly saw and keenly felt it. The 
army closely pursued Lee to Appomattox Court House, 
where, on the 9th, he surrendered the great army of 
Northern Virginia to General Grant, and the four years' 
war of the rebellion was virtually ended. 

The Eleventh Regiment joined in the grand review 
of the Second, Fifth and Ninth Corps, Sherman's entire 
army, and some other troops, at Washington, on the 23d 
and 24th of May. It was the grandest spectacle of the 
kind ever witnessed in this country. Two hundred 
thousand armed veterans passed the whole length of 
Pennsylvania Avenue, the reviewing officers being sta- 
tioned in front of the President's house. It has , been 
confidently claimed that, in soldier-like bearing and 
general appearance, no corps eclipsed the Ninth; no 
division the Second of that corps; no brigade the Second 
of that division, and no troops those of that brigade 
from New Hampshire. 

The Eleventh was mustered out of the United States 
service on the 4th of June, and immediately started for 
home, arriving at Concord on the afternoon of the 7th, 
meeting with a hearty reception in the State House 
yard. On the 10th the regiment was paid off and for- 
mally discharged. By order of the commanding gen- 
eral of the army, for meritorious conduct in battle, the 
Eleventh Eegiment inscribed upon its banner — "Fred- 
ericksburg, Vicksburg, Jackson, East Tennessee, the 
Wilderness, Spottsylvania, North Anna, Cold Harbor, 
Weldon Railroad, Poplar Grove Church, Hatcher's 
Run, Petersburg." 



462 THE GREAT REBELLION. 



TWELFTH REGIMENT. 



On the 10th of August, 1862, in response to the call 
of the President for three hundred thousand volunteers 
for three years, some prominent citizens of Belknap 
and Carroll Counties asked permission of Governor 
Berry to raise and officer a regiment of infantry, which 
was granted, on condition that it could be done in ten 
days. On the 16th of the same month the Adjutant 
General was notified that ten full companies had been 
raised, organized and were ready to be mustered into 
the United States service. They were ordered into 
camp at Concord on the 3d of September, and by the 
25th the regimental organization was completed. The 
following were its field, staff and company officers, with 
their official record, from the date of its muster-in to 
that of its muster-out : 



FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS. 

Colonels — Joseph H. Potter, of Concord. 

Wounded May 3, 1863. Promoted to Brigadier General U. S. V. May 1,1865. 
Thomas E. Barker, of Barnstead. 

Not mustered. Mustered out as Lieut. Colonel June 21, 1865. 

Lieut. Colonels — John F. Marsh of Hudson. 

Wounded May 3, 1863. Honorably discharged May 28, 1864. 

George D. Savage, of Alton. 

Honorably discharged May 28, 1864. 

Thomas E. Barker, of Barnstead. 

Promoted to Colonel May 26, 1865. 

Majors — George D. Savage, of Alton. 

Wounded May 8, 1868. Promoted to Lieut. Colonel Feb. 5, 1864. 
John F. Langley, of Pittsfield. 

Honorably discharged Sept. 22, 1864. 



TWELFTH REGIMENT. 463 

Nathaniel Shackford, of Holderness 

Mustered oat June 21, 1865. 

Adjutants — ^Daniel S. Bedee, of Meredith. 

Besigned May 16, 186S. 

Andrew M. Heath, of Loudon. 

Wounded slightly July SO, 1864. Promoted to Captain Jan. 10, 1866. 

Kufus E. Gale, of Gilmanton. 

Mustered out June 21, 1866, 

Quartermaster — ^Isaiah "Winch, of Meredith. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

Surgeon — Hadley B. Fowler, of Bristol. 

^ Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

Ass't Surgeons — Charles "W". Hunt, of Laconia. 

Died of typhoid fever, at Point Lookout, Md., August 24, 1863. 

Samuel P. Carbee, of Bath. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 
John H, Sanborn, of Meredith. 

Besigned July 21, 1864. 
Chaplains — Thomas L. Ambrose, of Ossipee. 

Wounded severely July 24, 1864. Died of wounds Aug. 19, 1864. 

Josiah B. Higgins. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

Sergeant Majors — ^Edwin E. Bedee. 

Promoted to First Lieut Dec. 22, 1862. 

Andrew M. Heath, of Loudon. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. Jan. 26, 1863. 

Asa W. Bartlett, of Pittsfield. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. March 3, 1864. 

Frederick P. Rhodes, of E'ew Hampton. 

Bedaced to the ranks for cowardice, and assigned to Co. E, June 12, 1864. 

Edward F. Gordon, of New Hampton. 

Promoted to First Lieut. March 1, 1865. 

David S. Dockham, of Gilmanton. 

Promoted to First Lieut June 6, 1866. 

Quartermaster Sergeants — Josiah H. Prescott. 

Promoted to Second Lieut Nov. 18, 1862. 

George W. Edwards. 

Promoted to Second Lieut May 18, 1866. 

Commissary Sergeants^ — John H. Prescott, of Pittsfield. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. Feb. 8, 1864. 

George B. Lane, of Gilford. 

Promoted to Second Lieut May 26, 1865. 

Hospital Steward — Thomas E. Hunt, of Gilford. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 



464 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

ipal Musicians — James S. '. 
Ira C. Evans, of Concord 



Principal Musicians — James S. Baker, of Holdemess. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 



Mustered out June 21, 1866. 
COMPANY OPnCERS. 

Co. A. — Captains — Moses H. Savage of New Durham. 

KiUed Ma^ 3, 1863. 

-William H. H, Pernald, of Gilford. 

Honorably discliarged Dec. 7, 1864. 

Ephraim "W. Kicker. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — James N. York, of Alton. 

Resigned Feb. 9, 1863. 

Andrew J. Huntoon, of Plymouth. 

Promoted to Captain Feb. 1, 1864. 

Gorham P. Dunn, of Laconia. 

KiUed at Cold Harbor, Va., June 8, 1864. 

Ephraim "W". Ricker. 

Promoted to Captain Jan. 10, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — ^Nathan Chesley, of Alton. 

Discharged Feb. 7, 1863. 

Arthur St. Clair Smith, of Gilford. 

Transferred to Go. B. 

Mayhew C. Batchelder, of New Durham. 

Promoted to First Lieut. July 20, 1864. 

Co. B. — Captains — Thomas E. Barker, of Barnstead. 

Wounded May 8, 1868. Promoted to Lieut. Colonel Sept. 30, 1864. 

James W. Saunders, of Alexandria. 

Discharged May 19, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — John M. Durgin, of Gilmanton. 

Promoted to Captain May 4, 1863. 

Horace Edgerly, of Barnstead. 

Resigned June 9, 1864. 

Mayhew C. Batchelder, of New Durham. 
Wounded eUghtly Aug. 19, 1864. Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — Charles E. Marsh, of Gilmanton, 
Promoted to First Lieut. Feb. 4, 1863. 

Gorham P. Dunn, of Laconia. 

Promoted to First Lieut Feb. 1, 1864. 

Rufus E. Gale, of Gilmanton, 

Promoted to First Lieut Aug, 16, 1864. 



TWELFTH REGIMENT. 465 

Arthur St. Clair Smitli, of Gilford. 
TranBferred from Co. A. Wounded severdy May 3, 1863. Promoted to 
First Lieut. June 12, 1863. 

Co. C. — Captains — ^Blake Fowler, of Bristol. 

Resigned May 11, 1863. 

John M. Durgin, of Gilmanton. 

Resigned Jan. 4, 1864. 

James T. Smith, of Danbury. 

Honorably discliarged Sept. 22, 1864. 

Asa W. Bartlett, of Pittsfield. 

Honorably discharged for disability March 18, 1865. 

Daniel W. Bohonon. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — James T. Smith, of Danbury. 

Promoted to Captain April 22, 1863. 

Henry A. L. French, of Pittsfield. 

KiUed July 2, 1863. 

Charles E. Marsh, of Gilmanton. 

Transferred from Co. F. Discharged Oct. 15, 1863. 

Hosea Q. Sargent, of Ifew Hampton. 

Promoted to Captain March 3, 1864. 

Joseph K. Whittier, of Laconia, 

Transferred to Co. D. 

James "W. Saunders, of Alexandria. 

Promoted to Captain Oct. 28, 1-864. 

George E. "Worthen. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — H. Q. Sargent, of ISTew Hampton. 

Wounded sererely May 3, 1863. Promoted to First Lieut May 4, 1863. 

James W. Saunders, of Alexandria. 

Promoted to First Lieut. July 15, 1864. 

George K. Hughes. 

Not mustered. Killed at Cold Harbor, Va., June 4, 1864. 

Co. D. — Captains — J, "Ware Butterfield, of Sanbornton. 

Honorably discharged Nov. 17, 1862. 

Orlando W. Keyes, of Holderness. 

Killed May 3, 1863. 

John S. Veasey, of Gilford. 

Dismissed Feb. 15, 1864. 

Andrew J. Huntoon, of Plymouth. 

Honorably discharged June 16, 1864. 

John W, Johnson, of Pittsfield. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 



466 TSE GREAT BEBELLIOS. 

First Lieuts.— David E. Everett, of Bristol. 

Discharged Jan. 23, 1868. 

John S. Veasey, of Gilford. 

Promoted to Captain Aug. 25, 1863. 

Joseph K. "Whittier, of Laconia. 
Transferred from Co. C. Killed at Cold Harbor, Va., June 3, 1864. 

George "W. Hall, of Sanbornton. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — B. M. Morrill, of Sanbornton. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Nov. 18, 1862. 

Josiah H. Prescott, 

Discharged for disability iJune 25, 1868. 

George "W". Hall, of Sanbornton. 

Promoted to First Lieut. July 20, 1864. 

Co. E. — Captains — -ilsrathaniel Shackford, of Holderness. 

Wounded slightly May 3, 1863. Wounded severely June 8, 1864. Promoted 
to Major Nov. 16, 1864. 

Andrew M. Heath, of Loudon. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Orlando "W. Keyes, of Holderness. 

Promoted to Captain Nov. 18, 1862. 

Bradbury M. Morrill, of Sanbornton. 

Honorably discharged Nov. 11, 1863. 

Arthur St. Clair Smith, of Gilford. 
Wounded severely twice June 8, 1864. Promoted to Captain July 20, 1864. 

Edward L. Shepard, of Holderness. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — A. J. Huntoon, of Plymouth. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Feb. 9, 1863. 

George S. Cram, of Meredith. 

Killed May 3, 1868. 

Edward L. Shepard, of Holderness. 

Promoted to First Lieut. July 20, 1864. 

Co. F.— Captains— John F. Langley, of Pittsfield. 

Promoted to Major Feb. 5, 1864. 

Hosea Q. Sargent, of New Hampton. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Sylvanus Smith, of Pittsfield. 

Resigned Feb. 3, 1868. 

Andrew M. Heath, of Loudon. 

Promoted to Adjutant June 1, 1863. 

John W. Johnson, of Pittsfield. 

Pitnnoted to Captain July 20, 1864. 



TWELFTH BEQIMENT. 467 

Charles S. Emery, of Canterbury. 

Died August 1, 1864. 
Hufas E. Gale, of Gilmanton. 

Promoted to Adjutant March 1, 1865. 
Charles E. Marsh, of Gilmanton. 

Transferred to Co. C. 

Edward F. Gordon, of New Hampton. 

Promoted to Captain June 6, 1866. 

Second Lieuts. — H. A. L. French, of Pittsfield. 

Promoted to First Lieut. April 22, 1863. 

Horace Edgerly, of Barnstead. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Oct. 15, 1863. 

Charles S. Emery, of Canterbury. 
Wounded severely June 8, 1861. Promoted to First Lieut. July 20, 1864. 

Co. G. — Captains — Charles "W. Chase of Gilford. 

Honorably discharged April 8, 1863. 

Edwin S. Bedee, of Meredith. 
Wounded soYerdy June 4, 1864. Missing at Bermuda Hundred, Va. 
Gained tcom misrang. Promoted to Major May 26, 1865, 

First Lieuts. — J. M. Emerson, of Moultonboro. 

Besigned Dec. 20, 1862. 

Edwin S. Bedee, of Meredith. 

Wounded May 3, 1868. Promoted to Captain Sept. 2, 1864. 

John H. Prescott, of Pittsfield. 

Promoted to Captmn Sept. 2, 1864. 

John p. Lane. 

Honorably discharged April 28, 1866. 

Second Lieuts. — John S. Veasey, of Gilford. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Jan. 26, 1863. 

Andrew M. Heath, of Loudon. 

Promoted to First Lieut. May 12, 1868. 

Joseph K. "Whittier, of Laconia. 

Promoted In First Lieut. March 8, 1864. 

Asa W. Bartlett, of Pittsfield. 

Promoted to First Lieut. July 15, 1864. 

Charles G. Sheldon, of "Warren. 
Not mustered. Died of wounds at Washington, D. C, June 27, 1864, before 
conunission was issued. Buried at National Cemetery, Arlington, Ya. 

Co. H. Captains — J. L. P. Whipple, of Gilford. 

Dismissed Aug. 24, 1868. 

Jeremiah Sanborn. 

Mustered out June 21, 1866. 

First Lieuts.^oseph S. Tilton, of Gilford. 

Wounded May 8, 1868. Honorably discharged Oot. 29, 1863. 



468 TSE ORE AT REBELLION. 

Abraham H. Milliken, of Gilford, 

Transferred from Co. B. Dishonorably discharged Ang. 23, 1864. , 

Daniel "W. Bohonon. 

Promoted to Gaptiun April 12, 1866. 

Second Lieuts. — ^A. H. Milliken, of Gilford.. 

Wounded May 3, 1863. Promoted to First Lieut. May 4, 1863. 

Joseph A, Fellows, of Gilmanton. 

Honorably discharged Sept, 17, 1864. 

t)o. I. — Captains — Joseph "W". Lang, Jr., of Meredith. 

Wounded May 3, 1863. Honorably discharged on account of wounds Aug. 
19, 1864. 

John H. Prescott, of Pittsfield, 

Mustered out June 21, 186S. 

First Lieuts.— Wm. H. H. Fernald, of Gilford. 

Promoted to Captain May 4, 1863. 

Alonzo W. Jewett. 
Wounded slightly June 8, 1864. Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — Wvn. "W. Stevens, of Meredith. 

Discharged April 5, 1863. 

"William P. Ham. 
Wounded severely June 3, 1864. Died of ireunds June 16, 1864. 

Co. K. Captains — Silas May, of "Wolfeborough, 

Wounded May 3, 1863. Honorably discharged June 19, 1864. 

Arthur St. Clair Smith, of Gilford. 

Mustered out June 21, 1866. 

First Lieuts.^ — ^Wm. F. Dame, of Tuftonborough, 

Discharged June 10, 1863. 

Jeremiah Sanborn. 

Promoted to Captain July 16,, 1864. 

Asa W. Bartlett, of Pittsfield. 

Promoted to Captain Sept. 28, 1864. 

Charles F. Towle, of iN'ew Durham. 

Missing at Bermuda Hundred, Va., Not. 17, 1864. Honorably discharged 
June 9, 1866. 

Second Lieuts. — Geo. L. Batchelder, of Concord. 

Resigned Jan. 26, 1868. 

Jeremiah Sanborn. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Aug. 26, 1868. 

Ephraim "W. Ricker, of Tuftonboroughl 

Promoted to First Lieut. July 20, 1864. 



TWELFTH BEQIMENT. 469 



eENBKAL JOSEPH H. POTTER. 



Joseph Hayden Potter is the son of Thomas D. Potter, 
of Concord, where he was born Oct. 12, 1821. He was, 
for most of the years 1837 and '38, resident with an 
uncle in Portsmouth, preparing for college, and, the 
latter year, assistant in the male High School in that 
city. Receiving the appointment of Cadet through the 
recommendation of Hon. Samuel Cushman, of Ports- 
mouth, he entered "West Point, Academy in 1839, and 
graduated in 1843 ; was Brevet Second Lieutenant First 
Infentry, July 1, 1843; attached to the Seventh Infantry 
in 1845 ; severely wounded in the battle of Monterey, 
Sept. 21, 1846 ; brevetted First Lieut. " for gallant and 
meritorious conduct in the battle of Monterey, Mexico," 
Sept. 21, 1846; appointed First Lieutenant, Oct. 30, 
1847 ; Adjutant of the Seventh Regiment United States 
Infentry, for some four years prior to January, 1856 ; ap- 
pointed Captain, Jan. 7, 1856, and assigned to Company 
G, Seventh United States Lifantry; ordered with regi- 
ment to Utah territory, February, 1858, thence with 
re^ment to Ifew Mexico, May 15, 1860; surrendered 
by Major Lynde to Texan insurgents, July 27th, 1861 ; 
took command of the surrendered troops after their 
parole, and marched them across the country to Fort 
Leavenworth, Mo., and from thence to Jefferson Bar- 
racks, Mo., arriving there November, 1861 ; com- 
manding regiment at Fort Niagara from Majch, 
1862, until Sept. 17, 1862; then exchanged, and ap- 
pointed Colonel of the 12th New Hampshire Volunteer 
Regiment, assuming command of the same the 21st of 
that month; severely wounded in the battle of Chan- 
cellorsville and taken prisoner. May 3, 1863 ; exchanged 
Oct. 20, 1863; ordered to Columbus, Ohio, as Assis- 
tant Provost Marshal, Feb. 15, 1864; joined regiment 



470 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

Sept. 16, 1864^ in command of a brigade in the Eleventh 
Corps, until Dee. 2, 1864, and then assigned to the com- 
mand of the Second Brigade, Eighth Division, Twenty- 
fourth Corps ; appointed Chief of Staff of the Twenty- 
fourth Corps, Jan, 16, 1865; assigned to command of 
Second Brigade, Second Division, Twenty-fourth Corps, 
July 10, 1865; appointed Brigadier General of Volun- 
teers, May 1, 1865; served with Twenty-fourth Corps 
until it was broken up, in August, 1865 ; and mustered 
out of volunteer service, Jan. 16, 1866; commissioned 
Major of the Nineteenth Eegiment United States In- 
fantry, July 4, 1863; brevetted Lieutenant Colonel 
United States Army, Dec 13, 1862, "for gallant and 
meritorious conduct at the battle of Fredericksburg, 
Virginia;" brevetted Colonel United States Army, 
May 3, 1863, for gallant and meritorious service at 
the battle of Chancellorsville, Va.; brevetted Briga- 
dier General United States Army, March 13, 1865, for 
gallant and meritorious services in the campaign ter- 
minating with the surrender of the insurgent army 
under Gen. Robert E. Lee ; and commissioned Lieu- 
tenant Colonel in the Thirtieth United States Infantry, 
July 28, 1866. General Potter's services and their 
appreciation can best be estimated by his military 
record. 

The people of the Counties of Belknap and Carroll 
felt an especial pride in this regiment, as it was almost 
wholly composed of men and officers from their limits. 
It was made up of men of character and good standing, 
who enlisted because the country needed them to sup- 
press the rebellion. No regiment left the State with 
men of finer personal appearance, or of more gentle- 
manly bearing, and it sustained a high reputation for 
honor and sobriety throughout its whole term of service. 
The regiment left Concord for "Washington on the, 



TWELFTH REGIMENT. 471 

27tli of September, and joined Colonel Wright's di- 
vision of General Casey's command of the Reserve^ 
Army Corps, Defenses of "Washington. It was subse- 
quently assigned to General "Whipple's division. Third 
Army Corps, and with it marched from Berlin to Po- 
tomac Creek, near Falmouth, 'V"a., a distance of more 
than a hundred miles, arriving there on the 25th of 'So- 
vember. Unaccustomed to camp life, many of the men 
became sick from exposure, short rations, jaundice 
and measles. The latter, in most cases, proved fatal, 
or caused permanent disability. 

On the 12th of December, while crossing the Rappa- 
hannock river to Fredericksburg, the column was 
shelled by rebel batteries, and three commissioned 
officers and five enlisted men of the regiment were 
severely wounded. During the battle of Fredericksburg, 
on the 13th and 14th, the regiment was held in reserve, 
and in position for the support of batteries, and all the 
time under fire of musketry and cannon. After this 
memorable battle the Twelfth passed the remainder of 
the winter at Falmouth, engaged in the usual camp and 
picket duties. 

CHANCELLORSVILLB. 

On the 30th of April, 1863, the troops moved in the 
direction of Chancellorsville. At daylight on the 
morning of the 3d of May, Gen. "Whipple's division was 
formed in line^at the foot of the hill, near the Chancel- 
lor House, and at right angles with the plank road. It 
was ordered forward to meet a heavy force commanded 
by General Longstreet, and if possible hold the enemy 
until General Sickles could collect the scattered troops 
of his corps. Colonel Bowman, commanding the brig- 
ade, ordered the Eighty-fourth and One Hundred and 
Tenth Pennsylvania to be formed parallel with, and to 



472 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

tlie rear, to prevent a flank movement. These regi- 
ments vs^ere nearly all captured by an overwhelming 
force of the enemy, leaving the Twelfth, with a few 
troops on the right, to cope with a force at least three 
times its own. One of the most desperate musketry 
engagements ensued which has ever been witnessed. 
The regiment behaved splendidly, and retreated in good 
order, just in time to save its entire capture. General 
Whipple was mortally wounded, and while being carried 
from the field on a stretcher, bleeding and dying, said : 
" I hope I may live long enough to give Colonel Potter 
and his brave men a just report." The regiment went 
into the engagement in the morning with twenty-eight 
officers and five hundred and forty-nine enlisted men. 
It lost three commissioned officers killed j fifteen 
commissioned officers wounded ; forty-two enlisted 
men killed; two hundred and twelve enlisted men 
wounded; fifty-one enlisted men captured; three en- 
listed men missing, probably killed. Aggregate loss, 
three hundred and twenty-six. Captains Savage and 
Keyes and Lieut. Cram were shot dead ; Colonel Potter 
was seriously wounded in the leg ; Lieut. Colonel Marsh 
was wounded in the leg, and Major Savage was struck 
in the lower jaw by a musket ball and severely wounded. 
After the battle of Chancellorsville, and the retreat 
of the army, under command of General Hooker, the 
Twelfth returned to the camp it had occupied the pre- 
vious winter, where it remained until the 11th of June, 
when it broke camp and went in pursuit of the rebel 
army on its raid in Maryland and Pennsylvania. From 
here to Gettysburg the march was the most severe of 
any ever performed by the army of the Potomac, the 
men suffering from fatigue, short rations and excessive 
heat, many of whom fell out and died by the roadside. 
"When they met the enemy at Gettysburg it was a relief 
to many to know that they had an opportunity to fight 



TWELFTH REGIMENT. 473 

rather than march, and all went forward determined 
to conquer their foes or die in the attempt. 

Early on the morning of the 2d of July the line was 
formed under command of Captain J. F. Langley. The 
engagement commenced in the afternoon. The Twelfth 
was stationed near the center of the line where the 
enemy made a heavy attack. All through this bloody 
and decisive battle the regiment fought with great gal^ 
lantry, fully sustaining the reputation they had won at 
so heavy cost at Chancellorsville. It went into the fight 
with twelve officers and two hundred and twelve enlisted 
men, and lost one officer killed, five wounded ; twenty 
enlisted men killed, 'sixty-eight wounded. Aggregate 
loss, ninety-four. Lieut. H. A. L. Fletcher, while gal- 
lantly rallying his men, on the 2d, was killed by a bullet 
shot through the head. There were many instances of 
individual bravery, to mention any of which would seem 
to do injustice to others. 

The rebel army having retreated, the pursuit again 
commenced and a long march ensued. At "Warrenton, 
on the 26th of July, the Twelfth was ordered to report 
to General Marston, at Point Lookout, Maryland. 
From the 11th of June the regiment had been marching 
and fighting without rest of a single day. Many of the 
men had become sick from over exertion, and more than 
half of the remnant of the regiment were without shoes 
or stockings, their feet raw fi-om exposure to the sand 
and sun, and their clothing was literally in rags. It 
marched through Washington and arrived at Point 
Lookout on the 31st of July, where it remained guard- 
ing rebel prisoners, with the Second and Fifth Ifew 
Hampshire, until April, 1864. While here the regiment 
received three hundred and fifty recruits. Four hun- 
dred and fifty had been assigned to it, but one hundred 
deserted on the way to the regiment. 

The account of the organization of General Butler's 



474 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

army at Gloucester and Yorktbvra, and its movements 
up the James; its taking position at Bermuda Hundred; 
its fighting at Drury's Bluff, and its expedition in assist- 
ance of the Army of the Potomac, at Cold Harbor, has 
been so fully given in the history of the Second and 
other regiments as not to require repetition here. At 
Drury's Bluff the Twelfth was for four days and nights 
in succession in the front line without being relieved. 
On the 16th of May a general engagement took place, 
in which the Twelfth lost two enlisted men killed, and 
thirty-two wounded. After this battle the regiment 
encamped at Bermuda Hundred, and was engaged in 
building the defenses of that place. On the 26th of 
May the regiment was engaged in a skirmish at Port 
Walthal, in which two men were mortally wounded. 
At Cold Harbor, on the 3d of June, the Twelfth, with 
its brigade, made An advance across an open field upon 
the enemy's works, in which it lost two officers killed 
and six wounded ; thirty-eight enlisted men killed and 
one hundred and nineteen wounded. Making an aggre- 
gate loss of one huildred and sixty-five, out of less than 
three hundred tak^n into the engagement. Many of 
the wounded were left upon the field between the two 
lines of works, not more than seventy-five yards apart, 
for three days, before they could be taken away. — 
Twenty of the dead bf this regiment were found within 
five yards of the enemy's works. Captain Shackford, 
who had previously received five wounds, was severely 
wounded on this occasion. 

On the 15th of June the regiment disembarked at 
Bermuda Hundred, and the same night marched to the 
front of Petersburg, and on the next day formed a part 
of the line which carried the works. For seventy-two 
days the regiment was only relieved froin the trenches 
to take part in the battle of Cemetery Hill, at the 
explosion of the " Mine," on the 30th of' July. During 



TWELFTH REGIMENT. 475 

this time three officers were wounded, two enlisted men 
killed and twenty-nine wounded, while many were lost 
by sickness caused by the burning heat of the sun by 
day and the dampness of the trenches by night, in an 
unhealthy locality. 

On the 26th of August the Twelfth was relieved from 
the front of Petersburg, and moved to the defenses of 
Bermuda Hundred, where it joined Colonel Potter's 
reserve brigade. Colonel Potter who was wounded and 
taken prisoner at Chancellorsville, was exchanged on 
the 13th of October, 1863, but being unfit for field duty 
was on detached service until the 2d of September, 
1864, when he joined his regiment and was assigned 
to the command of a provisional brigade. 

On the 17th of November the enemy attacked the 
Union picket line, and in the engagement which ensued 
the regiment lost one officer wounded and two captured ; 
one enlisted man killed, six wounded and thirty«five 
captured, two of whom, Sergeant A. W. Batchelder and 
private Benjamin B. Thompson, escaped from Libby 
prison on the night of the 7th of December, and in 
eight days made their way to the Union lines. 

In the reorganization of the Tenth and Eighteeiith 
Army Corps, Colonel Potter was assigned to the com- 
mand of the Second Brigade, Third Division, Twenty- 
fourth Army Corps. During the winter of 1864-65 
the Twelfth Regiment formed a part of the line in front 
of Richmond. Here they constructed winter quarters 
which were pronounced by the inspector general to be 
the best in the Army of the James. 

During the night of the 2d of April, 1865, it was 
evident from indications in front that some unusual 
movements were going on within the enemy's lines. 
General Devens, who was in command, gave an order to 
advance the whole line at the first break of day on the 
3d. The enemy's guns were still pointing threateningly 



476 TEE QBEAT BEBELLION. 

toward the TJnion lines; their tents remained the same 
as they had been for weeks, and every thing bore the same 
appearance, yet the Union troops pressed forward, ex- 
pecting every moment the rebels would open fire upon 
them from their monster guns. They met with no oppo- 
sition, however, as they passed line after line of the rebel 
works, and entered Richmond, the birth-place of treason, 
about eight o'clock on the morning of the 3d of April, 
1865. The Mayor and Council had formally surrendered 
the city to a sqoiad of the Fourth Massachusetts Cavalry, 
about thirty minutes before the Twelfth Regiment 
arrived, in comniand of Captain H. Q. Sargent. Captain 
Sargent and his command were the first to take posses- 
sion of Jeff". Davis' mansion. The rebels had kindled 
fires in several places and the city was saved from total 
destruction only through the efforts of TJnion soldiers. 

The regiment remained in the city for several days, 
performing protost guard duty, when it moved with its 
brigade across the James river to Manchester, where 
it remained until May, when it was ordered to Danville, 
but returned to Manchester, where, with the Tenth and 
Thirteenth New Hampshire Regiments, it was mustered 
out of the United States service, on the 21st of June, 
and with them, under command of General Donohoe, 
started the next day for home, and arrived at Concord 
on the 27th. On the 3d of July the men were paid 
and finally discharged. 

For fourteen months before its muster out the regi- 
ment had been commanded by Colonel Thomas E. 
Barker, a most gallant and faithful officer, of whom 
it should be recorded that during the Active campaign 
of five months he was not absent from his regiment a 
single day. Chaplain T. L. Ambrose was wounded in 
front of Petersburg on the 24th of July, and died of 
his wounds on the 19th of August, 1864. He was one 
of the most noble, brave and humane men in the army. 



TWELFTH BEGIMENT. 477 

and by his many acts of kindness and Christianity had 
won the unbounded respect and affection of every man 
in the regiment. It was said of him that " A braver 
man never lived ; a truer man never wore the garb of 
Christianity." The Twelfth Eegiment contributed its 
share toward the proud record of New Hampshire in 
the war. 



478 THE GREAT REBELLION. 



THIRTEENTH REGIMENT. 



This regiment was raised unHer the same call, and 
about the same time as the four preceding ones, and 
was like them largely composed of the true hearted, 
intelligent and patriotic yeomanry and mechanics of the 
good State of New Hampshire, who appreciated the 
great struggle in which the country was engaged and the 
sacrifices they were called upon to make to insure the 
triumph of the cause of popular liberty. Eockingham, 
Hillsborough and Strafford Counties each furnished two 
companies, and Merrimack, Carroll, Grafton and Coos, 
one each. They went into camp at Concord the fore 
part of September, and the muster of the regiment into 
the United States service was completed on the 23d of 
of that month. The following were the field, staff and 
coijapany ofiicers, with the official record of each, during 
the term of service of the regiment: 

FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS. 

Colonel — ^Aaron F. Stevens, of Nashua. 

Wounded severely June 1, 1864. Wounded severely Sept. 29, 1864. Hon- 
orably discharged Feb. 4, 1866. Discharge suspended. Appointed Bri^idier 
General U. S. V., by brevet, to date from Dec. 8, 1864. Mustered out as Col- 
onel June 21, 1865. 

Lieut. Colonels — George Bowers, of Nashua. 

Resigned May 80, 1863. 
Jacob I. Storer, of Portsmouth. 

Honorably discharged May 28, 1864. 
William Grantman, of Wakefield. 

Honorably discharged Oct. 16, 1864. 
Normand Smith, of Stewartstown. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

Majors — Jacob I. Storer, of Portsmouth. 

Promoted to Lieut. Colonel June 1, 1863. 



THIRTEENTM BEaiMENT. 479 

William Grantman, of Wakefield. 

Promoted to Lieut. Colonel July 16, 1864. 

Normand Smith, of Stewartstown. 

Wounded slightly Sept. 29, 1864. Promoted to Lieut. Colonel July 15, 1864. 

Nathan D. Stoodley, of Peterborough. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

Adjutants; — George H. Gillis, of N'ashua. 

Resigned March 23, 1863. 

!Nathan B. Boutwell, of Lyndeborough. 

Wounded severely June 15, 1864. Honorably discharged for disability 
May 5, 1865. 

George H. Taggard, of lifashua. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

Quartermasters — ^Person C. Cheeney, of Peterborough. 

Resigned Aug. 6, 1863. 

Mortier L. Morrison, of Peterborough. 

Mustered out June 21, 1866. 

Surgeons — George B. Twitchell, of Keene. 

Resigned March 24, 1868. 

Samuel A. Richardson, of Marlborough. 

Mustered out June 21, 1863. 

Assistant Surgeons — S. A. Richardson, of Marlborough. 

Promoted to Surgeon April 1, 1863. 

John Sullivan, Jr., of Exeter. 

Honorably discharged Aug. 16, 1864. 

EzeMel Morrill, of Concord. 

Promoted to Surgeon 1st N. H. H. Art Nov. 17, 1864. 

Horatio N". Small, of Lancaster. 

Promoted to Surgeon 10th N. H. Vols. Aug. 20, 1863. 

John C. Emery. 

Mustered out June 21, 1866. 

Chaplain — George C. Jones, of ISTashua. 

Honorably discharged May 9, 1865. 

Sergeant Majors — ^William J. Ladd, of Portsmouth. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. Dec. 30, 1862. 

Charles C. Favor, of Boston^ Mass. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. Nov. 28, 1863. 

James M. Hodgdon, of Rollinsford. 

Wounded severely Sept. 30, 1864. Promoted to Second Lieut. June 16, 1865. 

Quartermaster Sergeants — M. L. Morrison of Peterboro'. 

Promoted to Quartermaster, Aug. 12, 1868. 

Charles A. Ames, of Peterborough. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 



480 THE aSEAT REBELLION. 

Commissary Sergeants — George H, Taggard, of Nashua. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. Much 16, 1864. 

George W. Ferguson, of Monroe. 

Promoted to First Lieut. July 15, 1864. 

George Eurns, of Concord. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. June 15, 1865. 

Hospital Stewards — John J. "Whittemore. 

Discharged for disability Nov. 22, 1862. 

Royal B. Prescott, of Nashua. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Oct 28, 1864. 

D. W. Butterfield, of Nashua. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

Principal Musicians — Charles C. Hall, of Strafford. 

Died of disease Jan. 22, 1865. 

Manson S. Brown of Campton. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

COMPANY OFFICEKS. 

Co. A. — Captains — "William Grantman, of Wakefield. 

Promoted to Major June 1, 1863. 

Buel C. Carter, of Ossipee. 

Appointed A. Q. M. Vols., May 17, 1864. 

George A. Bruce, of Mont Vernon. 

Wounded slightly Sept. 29, 1864. Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

First Lients. — Buel C. Carter, of Ossipee. 

Wounded severely Dec. 13, 1862. Promoted to Captain June 1, 1868. 

Charles B. Gafney, of Ossipee. 

Wounded severely June 15, 1864. Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — Charles B. Gafney, of Ossipee. 

Promoted to First Lieut. June 1, 1868. 

Henry Churchill, of Brookfield. 

Honorably dischco^ for disability Feb. 28, 1865. 

Co. B. — Captains — ^Elisha E. Dodge, of Rollinsford. 

Wounded severely June 16, 1864. Died of wounds June 22, 18G4. 

Marshall Saunders, of Littleton. 

Wounded slightly Sept. 29, 1864. Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — George A. Bruce, of Mont Vernon. 

Promoted to Captain May 30, 1864. 

"William J. Ladd, of Portsmouth. 

Wounded severely Sept. 29, 1864. Appointed Captain U. S. V., by brevet, 
for gallant and meritorious services, to date from March 13, 1865. Mustered 
out as First Lieut. June 21, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — ^N. B. Boutwell, of Lyndehoro'. 

Promoted to Ac^utant March 24, 1863. 



THIRTEENTH BEOIUENT. 481 

Charles M. Kittridge, of Mont Vernon. 

Resigned Nov. 3, 1863. 

Charles C. Favor, of Boston, Mass. 

Honorably diaohiarged Sept. 5, 1864. 

Co. C. — Captains — Charles 0. Bradley, of Concord. 

Resigned June 10, 1864. 

James M. Durell, of Ifew Market. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Charles H. Curtis, of Farmington. 

Promoted to Captain Oct. 28, 1864. 

Eoyal B. Prescott, of Nashua. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — ^Rufus P. Staniels, of Concord. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Feb. 20, 1863. 
"Wm. H. McConney, of Windham. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

Co. D. Captain — George Farr, of Littleton. 

Wounded severely June 1, 1864. Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — ^Edward Kilburn, of Littleton. 

Resigned Jaoa. 24, 1863. 

Marshall Saunders, of Littleton. 

Promoted to Captain July 15, 1864. 

Robert R. Thompson, of Stratford. 

Killed in action at Fort Harrison, Va., Sept. 29, 1864. 

Andrew J. Sherman, of Bethlehem. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — Marshall Saunders, of Littleton. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Jan. 25, 1863. 

Andrew J. Sherman, of Bethlehem. 

Promoted to First Lieut Oct. 28, 1864. 

Co. E. — Captain — George ^N". Julian, of Exeter. 

Mustered out Jan. 31, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — James M. Durell, of New Market. 

Wounded Dec. 18, 1862. Wounded sUghtly June 3, 1864. Promoted to 
Captain July 15, 1864. 

Oliver M. Sawyer, of Nashua. 

Honorably discharged March 10, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — ^H. H. Murray, of New Market. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Feb. 20, 1863. 

S. Millett Thompson, of Durham. 

Wounded severely June 15, 1864. Honorably discharged Oct. 4, 1864. 

Co. F. — Captains — ^Lewis H. Buzzell, of Barrington. 

Kaied May 8, 1863. 



482 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

Gustavus A. Forbush, of Peterborough. 

Killed in action at Fort Harrison, Va., Sept 29, 1864 

Charles H. Curtis, of Farmington. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Wva.. H. H. Young, of Barrington. 

Honorably discharged Feb. 2, 1864. 

Jonathan Dustin, of Barrington. 

Honorably discharged Oct. 1, 1864. 

George H. Taggard, of Ifashua. 

Promoted to Adjutant May 30, 1866. 

Second Lieuts. — ^Hubbard W. Hall, of Strafford. 

Promoted to First Lieut. May 1, 1861 

Jonathan Dustin, of Barrington. 

Promoted to First Lieut. March 16, 1864. 

George H. Taggard, of l^ashua. 
Wounded severely June S, 1864. Promoted to First Lieut. Oct. 28, 1864. 

Co. G. — Captains — ^N. D. Stoodley, of Peterborough. 

Promoted to Major Oct, 28, 1864. 

Lewis p. Wilson, of Greenfield. 

Mustered out June 21, 1866. 

First Lieuts.-^-G. A. Forbush, of Peterborough. 

Promoted to Captain May 6, 1863. 

Lewis P. "Wilson, of Greenfield. 

Promoted to Captain Jan. 2, 1866. 

Lucius C. Oliver, of New Ipswich. 

Promoted to First Lieut March 1, 1865. 

Co. H. — Captains — ^N'ormand Smith, of Stewartstown. 
' Promoted to Major Julj.l6, 1864. 

RufuB P. Staniels, of Concord. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Albe Holmes, of Stratford. 

Resigned Feb. 19, 1863. 

Rufus P. Staniels, of Concord. 
Wounded seyerely June 1, 1864. Promoted to Captain July 16, 1864. 

George W. Ferguson, of Monroe. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — ^Edward Parker, of Nashua. 

Resigned May 28, 1863. 

Robert R. Thompson, of Stratford. 

Wounded severdy May 16, 1864. Promoted to First Lieut July 15, 1864. 

Co. L — Captains — ^Luther M. Wright, of Nashua. 

Besigned Deo. 29, 1862. 

Enos W. Goss, of Portsmouth. 

Killed in action Oct 27, 1864. 



THIRTEENTH REGIMENT. 483 

First Lieuts. — ^Alfred S. Smith, of Pelham. 

Resigned Nov. 14, 1862 

Major A. Shaw, of l^ashua. 

Wounded Deo. 13, 1862. Resigned April 29, 1863, 

Hubbard AV". Hall, of Strafford. 

Wounded severely Sept. 29, 1864. Promoted to Captain March 1, 1865. 

Lucius C. Oliver, of JTew Ipswich. 

Mustered out June 21, 1863. 

Second Lieuts. — Major A. Shaw, of Ifashua. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Nov, 15, 1862. 

Oliver M. Sawyer, of iTashua. 

Promoted to First Lieut. July 15, 1864. 

Henry B. Wheeler, of Peterborough. 
Wounded sightly Sept. 29, 1864. Mustered out June 21, 1865. 

Co. K. — Captains — Matthew T. Betton, of Portsmouth. 

Mustered out June 21, 1865, 

First Lieuts, — ^Enoch "W", Goss, of Portsmouth. 

Promoted to Captain Deo. 30. 1862. 

ISTathan J, Coffin, of Portsmouth, 

Resigned June 9, 1863, 

Henry H. Murray, of New Market. 
Captured Oct. 27, 1864. Paroled Feb. 15, 1865. Mustered out, June 21,1865. 

Second Lieuts. — ]!fathan J. Coffin, of Portsmouth. 
Promoted to First Lieut Dee. 30, 1862. 

"William J. Ladd, of Portsmouth. 

Promoted to First Lieut. May 30, 1864. 

GENERAL AARON FLETCHER STEVENS. 

General Stevens was bom at -Derry, in Rockingham 
County, ISew Hampshire, August 9, 1819. When he 
was quite young his parents removed to Peterborough, 
in Hillsborough County, After attending the public 
schools of Derry and Peterborough he received a good 
academic education, and taught school several terms, 
Li 1838 he removed to ^Nashua, and pursued a course of 
study for three years with industry and zeal, calculated 
to fit him for the active duties of life. In 1842 he com- 
menced, the study of law in the office of Hon, George 
Y. Sawyer j an eminent member of the Hillsborough 
County bar, and since one of th,e Justices of the.- 



484 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

Supreme Judicial Court of New Hampshire. In 1845 
he was admitted to the bar and at once entered into 
copartnership with Mr. Sawyer, soon became known in 
his own and adjoining counties as an able, industrious 
and careful practitioner, and with his partner com- 
manded an extensive business. In 1856 Mr. Stevens was 
appointed by the Governor and Council, Solicitor for 
Hillsborough County, and performed the responsible 
duties of the position with faithfulness, ability and suc- 
cess for five years, and until the rebellion broke out. 
In the prosecution of the large number of criminal 
cases arising in that county he met the ablest lawyers in 
the State, sustained himself with credit on all occasions, 
and took a high and honorable position among his legal 
brethren. In 1858 Mr. Stevens became a partner of 
Hon. Aaron "W. Sawyer, of l^ashua, which arrangement 
continued until the former entered the army, to aid in 
the suppression of a most wicked rebellion. 

During the existence of the Whig party Mr. Stevens 
was one of its most active members. In 1849 he was 
elected to the popular branch of the Legislature from 
l^ashua, and again in 1854, and was one of the most 
industrious and useful members of that body. He was 
also elected to the Legislature in 1856 and 1857, taking 
a leading position on committees, and upon the floor, as 
an able, earnest and pleasing debater, espousing and 
maintaining the principles of the Republican party. 
He was a member of the "Whig N'ational Convention at 
Baltimore, in 1852, which nominated General "Winfield 
Scott as the candidate for President. 

"When the war of ^the rebellion broke out, in April, 
1861, Mr. Stevens was among the first men in the State 
to tender his services to the Governor. When the First 
Eegiment was being organized he was tendered and 
accepted the position of Major of it, and served with 
that organization^ until the expiration of its term of 



TEIRTEENTH BEQIMENT. 485 

enlistment, with credit to himself and the State. When 
the Thirteenth Regiment was organized, in the autumn 
of 1862, Major Stevens was commissioned its Colonel, 
went with it to the field, and followed its fortunes until 
the end of the war. He distinguished himself for 
gallantry, courage, coolness and skill as an officer on 
many bloody fields, and was often commended by his 
superior officers. In the assault on Fort Harrison, 
September 29, 1864, Colohel Stevens was in command 
of a brigade, comprising his own and three New York 
regiments. He fell severely wounded while at the 
head of his brigade and within a few yards of the 
fort, where he remained until the colors of his command 
were planted upon the parapet of the captured work, 
and was then carried from the field. For his gallant 
and meritorious conduct in this and other engagements. 
Colonel Stevens was appointed Brigadier General United 
States Volunteers, by brevet, to date from December 8, 
1864. General Burnham, commanding the brigade in 
the attack on Petersburg, June 15, 1864, in his report 
of the affair to General Brooks, commanding the di- 
vision, said " I desire particularly to bring to your favora- 
ble notice Colonel Aaron F. Stevens, of the Thirteenth 
If ew Hampshire Volunteers, both for his personal gallan- 
try in charging the enemy's works on the 15th, and for 
the able manner in which he handled his regiment on 
that occasion. To him and to his regiment the success 
which was achieved is due in a very great measure, and I 
take pleasure in recommending him for promotion." 
This recommendation was fully and heartily endorsed by 
General Brooks in his report to General Smith, com- 
manding the Eighteenth Army Corps. General Stevens' 
military record is identical with that of the Thirteenth 
Regiment, and both are in a high degree honorable to 
the State. 

General Stevens was nominated as a candidate for 



486 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

member of Congress from the Second New Hampshire 
District, in December, 1866, and was elected the follow- 
ing March ; and was elected for a second term in March, 
1869. He has served on the standing committees on 
Revolutionary Claims, and Naval Affairs, and as a mem- 
ber of the special committee on the Treatment of Union 
Prisoners. As at the bar of his own country, in the 
•Legislature of Ms own State, and in the army for the 
suppression of the rebellion, so in Congress has General 
Stevens maintained a high and honorable position, for 
his industry on committees, his ability in debate, and 
his wisdom as a statesman. 

On the 5th of October, 1862, the Thirteenth Regiment 
received its colors, at the State House, from the hand of 
Hon. Allen Tenny, Secretary of State, and on the 
following day left for "Washington, fully armed and 
equipped. It went into camp near Fort Albany, on the 
south side of the Potomac, where it remained several 
weeks, engaged mostly in drill. The regiment arrived 
at Falmouth, opposite Fredericksburg, Ya., on the 9th 
of December, and was assigned to the First Brigade, 
commanded by Colonel Hawkins, Third Division, Gen- 
eral Getty, of the Ninth Army Corps, then commanded 
by General 0. B. Wilcox. 

The Thirteenth crossed the Rappahannock river, with 
its brigade, on the 11th, and held the lower part of thfe 
city. During the greater part of the battle on the 13th, 
the regiment was protected from the guns of the enemy 
by a bluff under which it was stationed. About five 
o'clock in the afternoon General Getty was ordered to 
attempt with his division what two corps had failed to 
accomplish, and had been repulled with terrible slaugh- 
ter. He was to carry tke batteries on Marye's Height — 
the most formidable position in the enemy's line. The 
diyision consisted of but two brigades — ^Hawkins' and 



THIRTEENTH REOIMENT. 487 

^Harland's. The former posted his brigade in two lin^s. 
The Thirteenth was on the right of the second line. 
The order to advance was obeyed promptly. The 
troops moved across the railroad under a considerable 
fire from both musketry and artillery, and charged up 
the steep bank, hoping to carry the works which crown- 
ed its crest. It was so dark that the line was consider- 
ably confused, and, receiving a terrific volley when 
within a few rods from the enemy, and the point aimed 
■ at, the regiments were broken up and retreated in dis- 
order. The lines of the Tenth and Thirteenth ITew 
Hampshire were immediately reformed by their com- 
manders, expecting to renew the attack, but the whole 
command was soon ordered to retire to the city. -The 
troops recrossed the river on the night of the 15th, and 
the regiment returned to its old encampment. During 
the evacuation of the city, and while the remainder of 
the division retired across the river, the Thirteenth held 
the TJnion picket line along the railroad and on both 
sides of Hazel run. Lively firing was kept up durih'g 
the night with the enemy's pickets. It was a position 
of responsibility and peril, and was held by the regi- 
ment until three o'clock on the morning of the 16th, 
when it was relieved and again joined its brigade. In 
this battle the Thirteenth lost three officers and thirty- 
nine men killed, wounded and prisoners. Captain Car- 
ter and Lieuts. Durell and Shaw were slightly wounded. 
This was the first time the regiment had met the enemy 
or been under fire, but it proved the coolness and gal- 
lantry of the officers and the bravery of the men. 

The Thirteenth shared with the army the cold and 
snow, the mud and exposure of Falmouth, and suffered 
Severely from sicknes^of officers and men. It moved 
with the Ninth Corps to Newport News, in February, 
1863, and on the 13th of March, with the division, to 
Suffolk, where it was actively engaged in the defense of 



488 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

that place against the Biege which soon followed, and 
was under fire most of the time for jfour weeks. 

On the 3d of May a reconnoissance was ordered, and 
the Thirteenth and three other regiments, with some 
artillery and cavalry, crossed the I^ansemond on the 
Providence Church road, and in their advance drove in 
the skirmishers of the enemy, who retired to their rifle- 
pits in the edge of the woods, where they occupied a 
line more' than half a mile long. Upon this the Thir- 
teenth, with a part of the Eighty-ninth JS'ew-York, 
charged, under command of Colonel Stevens, and car- 
ried the works at the point of the bayonet, the killed 
and wounded of the enemy falling into the hands of the 
Union troops. The enemy were driven through the 
woods, and a strong line of intrenchments, heavily gar- 
risoned, unmasked. The artillery opened a sharp fire 
upon the works, which was briskly replied to, the fight 
lasting until dark. The same night the enemy withdrew 
from his position, raised the siege of Suffolk, and 
retreated toward Blackwater, closely followed by the 
Union troops, who captured a large number of prison- 
ers. The regiment was particularly complimented for 
its conduct in this affair. Its loss in killed and wounded 
was about thirty. Captain Buzzell was killed, and 
Lieut. Murray severely, and Captain Stoodley slightly, 
wounded. 

During the ensuing summer and fall the reginent was 
engaged upon the fortifications in the vicinity of Ports- 
mouth, doing an immense amount of labor. It partici- 
pated in General Dix's expedition to Hanover Junction, 
in June, suffering much from the exposure and hardship 
of the march, which was followed after its return to 
camp, by extraordinary sickness and mortality. Com- 
panies B and D were soon after placed in Fort Tallihg- 
hast, in the line of defenses, where they remained until 
the following winter, instructed and exercised in heavy 



THIRTEENTH REOIMENT. 489 

artillery. The regiment passed the winter in comforta- 
ble quarters, erected by the men, doing but little severe 
duty. During the faU and winter the regiment received 
an accession of two hundred and forty recruits, many of 
whom were substitutes. 

For the campaign of 1864 the regiment was organized 
with the Second Brigade and First Division of the 
Eighteenth Army Corps. The brigade was composed 
of the Tenth and Thirteenth N^ew Hampshire, Eighth 
Connecticut, and Hundred and Eighteenth ITew York, 
under command of Brigadier General Hiram Burnham, 
formerly colonel of the Sixth Maine. The Eighteenth 
Corps was under command of Major General W. F. 
Smith. From Yorktown the corps moved up the James 
river, landed at Bermuda Hundred, and on the 7th of 
May the Thirteenth was engaged with the enemy 
on the Walthal railroad; and on the 9th and 10th 
Hfought them at Swift creek, near Petersburg, driving 
them across the creek, and losing in these operations 
several men killed and wounded. On the 12th it again 
met the enemy on the Richmond and Petersburg turn- 
pike, drove them toward Richmond, capturing several 
prisoners; on the 13th and 14th drove them across 
Eingsland creek from their rifle-pits and intrenchments, 
and capturing their outer line of works at Drury's 
Bluff. The regiment was constantly under fire, a por- 
tion of it being night and day on the skirmish line, with 
the remainder in support. The position in the captured 
works assigned to the Thirteenth, being on the extreme 
left of the brigade, with the Tenth New Hampshire 
joining it on the right, was held until the morning of 
the 16th, when Beauregard, with thirty thousand troops, 
in the dense fog, attacked General Butler's line, and 
surprised and routed General Heckman's command on 
the right,' forcing it back. The attack commenced 
about four o'clock, but the tenth and Thirteenth were 



490 TSE GREAT REBELLION. 

under arms and prepared' to receive the enemy. The 
day previous General Bumham had caused wires to 
be stretched along the front of his command, fastened 
to stumps, and about a foot from the ground. The 
rebels made a jB.erce attack on the skirmishers in front 
of the two itfew Hampshire Regiments, and forced them 
to retire ; but they were soon rallied, and their line 
reformed and held, until the enemy, being re-enforced, 
massed his troops directly in front of the Thirteenth, 
and advanced to the assault of its position, in three 
lines, forcing the skirmishers to retire to the main body. 
The enemy emerged from the woods and moved forward 
evenly under a hot and deliberate fire. When the 
enemy reached the wire his lines were entirely broken, 
when some fled and others threw down their arms. 
Each successive line was broken as soon as it reached 
the wire, and met the same fate as the first. The attack 
was handsomely repulsed by the Thirteenth, aided by 
the oblique fire of the Tenth. The enemy made two 
like attemps to carry the position, but were each time 
repulsed with heavy loss. The Thirteenth took fifty- 
nine prisoners, principally from the Forty-fourth Ten- 
nessee and Iforth Carolina regiments, including the 
Adjutant General of Bushrod Johnson. About nine 
o'clock peremptory orders were received from the di- 
vision commander to retire, the right and left of the line 
having fallen back, and they were reluctantly obeyed. 
The loss of the regiment in these operations toward 
Petersburg and Richmond, was thirty-one killed, 
wounded and, prisoners. Lieut. E.. B,. Thompson was 
wounded severely while on the picket line. 

The regiment with its corps arrived at Cold Harbor 
on the 1st of June, and on the afternoon of that day 
engaged the enemy, advancing under a terrific fire of 
artillery and musketry, gaining and holding ail advanced 
position commanding the enemy's works. The Thir- 



THIRTEENTH REGIMENT. 491 

teenth was in front of its brigade, and lost heavily — 
sixty officers and men having fallen in less than five 
minutes. Colonel Stevens and Captain Goss were 
slightly, and Captain Farr and Lieut. Staniels, severely 
wounded. On the 3d, the day of the main battle at 
Cold Harbor, the regiment was in front of and near the 
enemy's lines and under fire, suffering severely, but was 
not ordered to attack. Lieut. George H. Taggard was 
severely \^ounded, and Lieut. J. M. Durell received a 
slight wound in the neck. In subsequent operations at 
Cold Harbor the regiment was constantly on duty at the 
front, losing several men, among whom was Captain 
Julian, slightly wounded. The total casualties of the 
regiment at Cold Harbor were: officers wounded, six; 
men killed, fourteen; wounded and prisoners, sixty-four; 
total eighty-four. 

ATTACK ON PETERSBURG. 

On the 16th of June, in an attack upon Petersburg, 
the Thirteenth, under Colonel Stevens, covered the 
front of its whole division, and behaved so bravely as 
to call forth, in the reports of the generals commanding 
the brigade and division especial commendation. Gen- 
eral Bumham, in his report, said: "I threw my skir- 
mishers forward, and assaulting their line, advancing on 
the double-quick, under a severe musketry and artillery 
fire. My line dashed across the open field to the ene^ 
my's 'French rifle-pits,' which they captured with the 
entire force that occupied them. Nearly a hundred 
prisoners were captured here and were hastily sent to 
the rear, a portion of them guarded by men. from thfe 
Thirteenth New Hampshire, while others were probably 
driven to the rear without any guard whatever. Colonel 
Stevens then moved the line forward, and still encoun- 
tering a severe fire, they dashed across the open plain, 



492 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

through the ravine and up to the enemy's formidable 
works, assaulting and capturing battery ISo. 5 in a gal- 
lant manner. Captains E. W. G-oss, George N. Julian 
and N". D. Stoodley, of the Thirteenth New Hampshire, 
were among the first to enter the battery, and to them 
the officers commanding it surrendered. Lieut* Colonel 
Council, of the Twenty-sixth Virginia regiment. Major 
Beatty, and another Major, name unknown, surrendered 
their swords to Captain Julian, while Capta,in Sturte- 
vant, commanding the field battery which was captured, 
surrendered his sword to Captain Stoodley. The Thir- 
teenth captured in this work one color, five pieces of 
artillery and about one hundred prisoners. The number 
of prisoners captured in the whole affair could not have 
been less than two hundred." Immediately after the 
fort was entered by the Thirteenth, the captured guns, 
were, by order of Colonel Stevens, turned and fired on 
the retreating enemy. The loss of the regiment was 
heavy. Captain E. E. Dodge, a gallant officer, fell 
mortally wounded before the works were reached, and 
died in hospital seven days after. Adjutant Boutwell 
and Lieut. Gafney were dangerously wounded in front 
of, and near the works, while gallantly pressing forward 
in the assault. The whole number of killed and 
wounded, in the operations of the day, was forty-nine, 
the regiment going into action with fifteen officers and 
one hundred and eighty-nine muskets. Two rebel flags, 
one taken by Sergeant James R. Morrison, of Company 
K, the other by Corporal Peter Mitchell, of the same 
company, were sent by Colonel Stevens to the Governor 
of New Hampshire. 

The Thirteenth remained in front of Petersburg until 
the 27th of August. At the explosion of the " Mine," 
on the 30th of July, the brigade held the outer position 
of the IJnion works in front of the " crater " for two 
days after the other troops had retired. On the 25th of 



THIRTEENTH BEOIMENT. 493 

July the regiment was transferred to the First Brigade 
of the division, and Colonel Stevens was assigned to its 
command, which he retained until the assault on Fort 
Harrison, on the 29th of September. This was a 
formidable work in the enemy's line, at Chapin's 
Farm, half a mile from the north bank of the James 
river, and about six miles from Richmond. To the First 
Division, commanded by Brigadier General Stannard, 
of Vermont, was assigned the duty of assaulting and 
capturing this work. The division came upon the 
enemy's pickets at daylight on the morning of the 29th, 
and skirmishing at once commenced. The details of 
this engagement have been given in the history of the 
Tenth Regiment. 

On the next day, the 30th, the enemy attempted to re- 
take the fort, making four assaults upon the lines estab- 
lished by the Union troops, but was each time repulsed 
with terrible slaughter. In these assaults the Thirteenth 
received the enemy in open ground. Of their part in 
these operations, the official report of Lieut. Colonel 
Smith, gives the following account: "On the morn- 
ing of the 30th the regiment was again moved into the 
fort and placed at work on the left, where we were when 
it was found the enemy were massing on the right, when 
we were moved to the extreme right of the fort, our 
right resting on the intrenchments. About twenty 
minutes afterward the enemy made the attack. The 
regiment was almost entirely unprotected during the 
engagement, but never flinched, and kept up a de- 
structive fire upon the advancing enemy, who were re- 
pulsed in every attempt to recapture the fort. After the 
repulse of the enemy. Captain Goss, Company I, com- 
manding sharpshooters, captured the colors of three regi- 
ments of Clingman's brigade, with several prisoners." 

The conduct of the officers and men of the Thirteenth 
on these two days was Superb. But again its loss was 



494 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

severe. More than one-half the command which left 
camp on the night of the 28th, had melted away under 
the fire of the enemy. Two officers and thirteen men 
were killed, and seven officers and fifty-nine men wound- 
ed. Captain Forhush and Lieut. R. E. Thompson, both 
brave officers, were killed in the assault and capture of 
the fort. Colonel Stevens fell severely wounded in the 
assault, while at the head of his regiment and brigade, 
and within a few yards of the fort. Lieut. Colonel 
Smith, Captains Saunders and Bruce, and Lieuts. Ladd, 
Hall and "Wheeler, were wounded. 

The Thirteenth was assigned as a part of the garrison 
to Fort Harrison, now called Fort Burnham, in honor 
of General Burnham, who lost his life in its capture. 
It participated with its division in the movement to 
the Williamsburg road, on the 27th of October, but was 
held in reserve, and its list of casualties was small. It 
returned to Fort Harrison the next day. In the te- 
organization of the Army of the James, in December, 
the Thirteenth was assigned to ^ the First Brigade of 
the Third Division of the Twenty-fourth Corps, with 
which it served until its muster out of the service. 
During the winter furlough prizes were offered to the 
best soldier in each division. Sergeant Shattuck, of 
Company B, Thirteenth New Hampshire, received the 
first furlough granted, in a division of over six thousand 
men, and during the winter the regiment carried oflF a 
very large portion of the furlough prizes. 

The Thirteenth Regiment participated in the final 
movement upon Richmond, on the 3d of April, 1865. 
General Devens, commanding the division, in a om- 
plimentary letter to Governor Smj^th, of this State, 
dated at Richmond, June 22, 1865, speaking of the 
Tenth, Twelfth and Thirteenth regiments, says : " On 
the formation of the Twenty-fourth Corps, all these 
regiments formed a part of the Third Division, to which 



THIRTEENTH REGIMENT. 495 

they have until now belonged, and were of the first 
column that entered Richmond on the morning of April 
3d, 1865, the Thirteenth New Hampshire being the first 
regiment of the army whose colors were brought into 
the city." The Thirteenth was mustered out of the 
United States service on the 22d of June, and came home 
with the Tenth and Twelfth, under command of Brevet 
Brigadier General Donohoe. Arrived at Nashua, the 
officers of the brigade assembled at the Indian Head 
House and Captain George A. Bruce, of the Thirteenth, 
upon the staff of General Donohoe, in their behalf, 
presented Gr«neral Aaron F. Stevens, their old and 
esteemed commander, a saber, sash and belt, suitable to 
his rank. The General accepted the gift in a handsome 
and feeling speech, after which he reviewed the brigade, 
and it appeared so well as to receive the warmest en- 
comiums of thousands of spectators who witnessed it. 

Authority was received from the general command- 
ing the army for the Thirteenth Ee^ment to inscribe 
upon its colors the names and dates of the following 
engagements : 

Fredericksburg, December 13, 1862. 
Siege of Suffolk, April and May, 1863. 
Walthal Road, May 7, 1864. 
Swift Creek, May 9 and 10, 1864. 
Kingsland Creek, May 12 and 13, 1864. 
Drury's Bluff, May 14 and 16, 1864. 
Cold Harbor, June 1 and 3, 1864. 
Battery 5, Petersburg, June 15, 1864. 
Battery Harrison, September 29 and 30, 1864. 

The regiment was paid off and finally discharged at 
Concord on the Ist of July, 1865. Its record while in 
the service is a better commendation than words. 



496 THE GREAT REBELLION. 



FOURTEENTH REGIMENT. 



The Fourteenth was the last of the three years' regi- 
ments raised in New Hampshire. Like those which 
had preceded it, this regiment was composed of the 
intelligent and patriotic young men of the State, who 
enlisted from a sense of duty to the country. It was 
filled mostly with residents of the four western counties. 
Cheshire County furnished four companies, while Sulli- 
van, Grafton, Coos, Carroll, Merrimack and Hills- 
borough Counties furnished one Company each. The 
regiment was organized at Concord, and its muster into 
the United States service was completed on the 24th of 
September, 1862. The following were its field, staff 
and company officers, with the official record of each : 

FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS. 

Colonels— Robert Wilson, of Keene. 

Honorably discharged Sept. 6, 1864. 
Alexander Gardiner, of Claremont. 

Wounded severely Sept. 19, 1864. Died of wounds Oct. 8, 1864. 

Carroll D. Wright, of Swanzey. 

Honorably discharged March 18, 1865. 

Lieut. Colonels — Tileston A. Barker, of Westmoreland. 

Honorably discharged Feb. 5, 1865. 

Oliver H. Marston, of Sandwich. 

Mustered out July 8, 1865. 

Majors — Samuel A. Duncan, of Plainfield. 

Resigned Sept. 10, 1868, to accept Colonelcy in a colored regiment. 
Alexander Gardiner, of Claremont. 

Promoted to Colonel Sept. 12, 1864. 

Flavel L. Tolman, of Eindge. 

Mustered out July 8, 1865. 

Adjutants — Alexander Gardiner, of Claremont. 

Promoted to Major, Sept. 12, 1863. 



FOURTEENTH REGIMENT. 497 

Carroll D. Wright, of Swanzey. 

Promoted to Colonel Dec. 6, 1864. 
L. "Warren Wright, of Richmond. 

Mustered out July 8, 1865. 

Quartermasters — ^William A, Heard, of Sandwich. 

Resigned Oct. 15, 1863. 
Charles T. Webster, of Jaffrey. 

Mustered out July 8, 1865. 

Surgeon — ^William Henry Thayer, of Keene. 

Mustered out July 8, 1865. 

Ass't Surgeons — Marshall Perkins, of Marlow. 

Mustered out July 8, 1865. 

Franklin C. Weeks, of Chester. 

Died of disease at New England Rooms, New York City, March 28, 1864. 

Chaplain— Elihu T. Rowe, of Plainfield. 

Resigned July 20, 1863. 

Sergeant Majors — ^William H. Bryant, of Plainfield. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. Sept. 20, 1863. 

J. Henry Jenks, of Keene. 

Killed at Cedar Creek, Va., Oct. 19, 1864. 

John L. King, of Hinsdale. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Jan. 4, 1865. 

John Leathers, of Jaffrey. 

Mustered out July 8, 1865. 

Quartermaster Sergeants — ^Albert F. Hussey, of Dover. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Nov. 22, 1864. 

B. Frank Fellows, of Sandwich. 

Mustered out July 8, 1865. 

Commissary Sergeants — Milton S. Howe. 

Died of disease, at Of&itt's Cross Roads, Md., Not. 24, 1862. 

James W. Russell, of Keene. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. Jan. 4, 1865. 

Moses Wadleigh, of Weare. 

Mustered out July 8, 1865. 

Hospital Stewards — George D. Richardson, of Keene. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Jan, 4, 1865. 

Charles Hastings. 

Mustered out July 8, 1865. 

Principal Musicians — ^Henry M. Staples, of Keene. 

Mustered oiit July 8, 1866. 

George A. Day, of Keene. 

Mustered out July 8, 1866. 



498 TEE QBE AT REBELLION. 



COMPANY OFFICERS. 



Co. A. — Captains — ^Frank T. Barker, of Westmoreland. 

Honorably discharged April 27, 1864. 

Nathaniel L. Chandler, of Newbury. 

Died of disease at Bradford, N. H., Sept. 11, 1864. 

George F. Blanchard, of Hopkinton. 

Mustered out July 8, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Charles P. Hall, of Westmoreland. 

Promoted to Captain Feb. 19, 1864. 

Henry S. PauU, of Claremont. 

Killed near Winchester, Va., Sept. 19, 1864. 

L. Warren Wright, of Richmond. 

Promoted to Adjutant Jan 4, 1866. 

Charles G. Howard, of Winchester. 

Mustered out July 8, 1866. 

Second Lieuts. — ^Norman Howe, of Hinsdale. 

Honorably discharged Nov. 3, 1863. 

Henry S. PauU, of Claremont. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Feb. 19, 1864. 

L. Warren Wright, of Richmond. 

, Promoted to First Lieut Nov. 22, 1864. 

Co. B. — Captains — John J. Johnson, of Walpole. 

Honorably discharged Nov. 3, 1863. 

William A. Fosgate, of Winchester. 

Killed near Winchester, Va., Sept. 19, 1864. 

David A. McCurdy, of Webster. 

Wounded Sept. 19, 1864. Mustered out July 8, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — ^Artemas Adams, of Walpole. 

Resigned April 1, 1863. 

Charles E. Holbrook, of Charlestown. 

Honorably discharged April 28, 1864. 

David A. McCurdy, of Webster. 

Promoted to Captain Not. 22, 1864. 

George D. Bichardson, of Keene. 

Mustered out July 8, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — C. E. Holbrook, of Charlestown. 

Promoted to First Lieut April 4, 1863. 
Henry E. Barrett, of Charlestown. 

Discharged March 22, 1864. 

Artemas B. Colburn, of Bichmond. 

Killed at Winchester, Va., Sept 19, 1864. 



FOUMTKENTH REGIMENT. 499 

Co. C. — Captains — ^Amos D. Combs, of Swanzey. 

Dismissed Not. 14, 1863, 

Charles P. Hall, of ■Wfestmoreland. 

Mustered out July 8, 1865. 

Mrst Lieuts. — Ira Berry, jr., of Keene. 

Promoted to Captain Oct 1, 1863. 

John N. Bruce, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Captain Jan. 4', 1865. 

John L. Bang, of Hinsdale. 

Mustered out July 8, 1865. 

Second Lients. — 'Carroll D. "Wright, of Swanzey. 

Promoted to Adjutant Sept. 20, 1863. 
George F. Blanchard, of Hopkinton. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Feb. 19, 1864. 

FranMin "Wheeler, of Milan. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Nov. 22, 1864. 

Co. D. — Captain — Caleb "W. Hodgdon, of "Weare. 

I Mustered out July 8, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Stark Fellows, of East "Weare. 

Resigned Sept. 4, 1863. 

"Walter H. Sargent, of "Webster. 

Wounded Sept. 19, 1864. Honorably discharged Jan. 18, 1865. 

Charles O. Cragin, of Dublin. 

Mustered out July 8^ 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — John N. Brown, of Seabrook. 

Kesigned March 9, 1863. 

William H. B^ryant, of Plainfield. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Feb. 19, 1864. 

Eussell F. Smith, of Hinsdale. 

Mustered out July 8, 1865. 

Co. E. — Captains — ^Freedom M. Rhodes, of Lancaster. 

Besigned July 23, 1863. 

Flavel L. Tolman, of Eindge. 

Promoted to Major Dec. 6, 1864. 

JohniN". Bruce, of Manchester. 

Mustered out July 8, 1865, 

First Lieuts. — ^William Cobleigh, of Hanover. 

Promoted to Captain Nov. 22, 1864. 

Franklin Wheeler, of Milan. 

Mustered out July 8, 1865. 

Second Lieuts.^-John E. Willis, of Gorham. 

Resigned Sept. 16, 1863. 

Jesse A. Fiske, of Dublin. 

Promoted to First Lieut. May 27, 1864. 



500 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

Asa W. Richardson, pf Cornish, 

Promoted to First Lieut. Jan. 4, 1866. 

James "W. Russell, of Keene. 

Promoted to First Lieut Feb. 17, 1865. 

Co. F. — Captains — Theodore A. Ripley, of "Winchester. 

Mustered out May 16, 1866. 

First Lieuts. — Stephen Phelps, of Winchester. 

Besigned Jan. 20, 1864. 

George F. Blanchard, of Hopkinton. 

Promoted to Captain Nov. 22, 1864. 

Elbridge D. Hadley, of Deering. 
Transferred from Co. H, Nov. 22, 1864. Transferred to Co. I. 

Asa "W. Richardson, of Cornish. 

Honorably discharged July 27, 1866. 

Second Lieuts. — "Wm. A. Fosgate, of Winchester. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Not. 2', 1863. 

Elbridge D. Hadley, of Deering. 

Promoted to First Lieut. July 6, 1864. 

Marcus M. Holmes, of Diinbarton. 

Transferred fi^m Co. H, July 6, 1864. Not mustered. Promoted to First 
Lieut. Nov. 22, 1864. 

Co. G. — Captains — Solon A. Carter, of IKeene. • 

Promoted to Assistant Adjutant General of Vols. July 8, 1864, irith rank 
of captain. 

John W. Sturtevant, of Keene. 

Mustered out July 8, 18C5. 

First Lieuts. — C. Fred Webster, of Keene. 

Promoted to Quartermaster Oct. 16, 1863. 

Flavel L. Tolman, of Rindge. 

Promoted to Captain Jon. 1, 1864. 
John W. Sturtevant, of Keene. 
Wounded Sept. 19, 1864. Promoted to Captain Jan. 4, 1865. 
Second Lieuts. — Spencer L. Bailey, of Jaffrey. 

Resigned Feb. 18, 1863. 

Flavel L. Tolman, of Rindge. 

Promoted to First Lieut Oct 17, 1868. 
John W. Sturtevant, of Keene. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Jan 1, 1864. 

Edward B. Howard, of Alstead. 

Dishonorably discharged May 1, 1865. 

James H. Hunt, of Stoddard. 

Mustered out July 8, 1865. 

Co. H. — Captains — ^William E. Bunton, of Dunbarton. 

Discharged Sept 25, 1868. 



FOURTEENTH REGIMENT. 501 

Ira Berry, jr., of Keene. 

Wounded Sept. 19, 1864. Mustered out July 8, 1865. 
First Lieuts. — ^Albert H. Sawyer, of "Weare. 

Discharged Sept. 25, 1863. 
"William A. Fosgate, of Winchester. 

Promoted to Captain Feb. 19, 1864. 
"William H. Bryant, of Plainfield. 

Honorably discharged May 20, 1864. 
Marcus M. Holmes, of Dunbarton. 

, Mustered out July 8, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — "Walter H. Sargent, of "Webster. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Not. 1, 1863. 

David A. McOurdy, of "Webster. 

Promoted to First Lieut. May 27, 1864. 

Co. I. — Captains — Sylvester M. Bugbee, of Cornish. 

Resigned Dec. 17, 1862. 
"William H. Chaffin, of Claremont. 

Killed near Winchester. Va., Sept. 19, 1864. 

"William Cobleigh, of Hanover. 

Mustered out July 8, 1866. 

First Lieuts. — ^Nathan'l L. Chandler, of Newbury. 

Promoted to Captain May 27, 1864. 

George H. Stone, of Marlborough. 
Wounded Sept. 19, 1864. Died of wounds Sept. 25, 1864. 

Second Lieuts. — J). J. Pillsbury, of Grantham. 

Died of typhoid fever at Washington, D. C, Aug. 11, 1863. 

George H Stone, of Marlborough. 

Promoted to First Lieut. May 27, 1864. 

Henry P. Page, of Center Harbor. 

Mustered out May 15, 1865. 

Co. K. — Captain — Oliver H. Marston, of Sandwich. 

Promoted to Lieut. Colonel March 24, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — Jason D. Snell, of Pembroke. 

Died of quick consumption, at CarroUton, La., April 26, 1864. 

Jesse A. Fiske, of Dublin. 

KiUed near Winchester, Va., Sept. 19, 1864. 

Albert F. Hussey, of Dover. 

Mustered out July 8, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — M. S. Webster, of Sandwich. 

ded at Sandwich, N. H., of wounds received at Winchester, Va., Sept. 19, 
1864. 

Octavius C. Mason, of Sandwich. 

Mustered out July 8, 1865. 



502 THE GREAT REBELLION. 



COLONEL ROBERT WILSON. 



Colonel Eobert "Wilson was born at Peterborough, 
Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, September 24th, , 
1811. His father, Hon. James Wilson, a lawyer of con- 
siderable distinction, removed to Keene in November, 
1814. Colonel Wilson graduated at Amherst College, 
Massachusetts, in 1832. He was commissioned Captain 
of the' Keene Light Infantry in September, 1833, soon 
after the visit of that company to Concord to receive 
General Andrew Jackson. In 1836 and 1837 he com- 
manded the Twentieth Eegiment, New Hampshire 
Militia, and was then Division Inspector, under his 
brother, James Wilson, who was Major General of the 
Third Division. In 1847 he again took command of the 
Keene Light Infantry for a season, to assist in resusci- 
tating it. Early in the summer of 1861 Colonel Wilson 
was offered the command of one of the regiments being 
raised in New Hampshire for the war, but was unable, 
for private reasons, to accept it. In August, 1862, he 
notified the Governor that if he would give him a full 
regiment he would go into the service. The reply was 
a Colonel's commission for the Fourteenth Regiment, 
which was to be the last of the three years' regiments sent 
from the State, and which was expected to be a very large 
one. At one time the returns from the different enlist- 
ing officers showed a list of nineteen hundred men await- 
ing orders. When they reported at Concord there was 
such an avalanche of men, with no arms and no equip- 
ments ready to furnish them, that many enlisting officers 
were permitted to tear up their papers and let the men go 
without being called upon. Indeed so late as October, 
1862, there were thousands of men throughout the coun- 
try, enlisted and organized into regiments and doing 
duty with clubs, awaiting clothing and arms, but the 



FOUBTEENTE SEGIMENT. 503 

government had none to fumisli. Eather than go to 
Washington without arms, Colonel Wilson picked out of 
a lot of old state arms enough flint lock guns, altered 
into percussions, to arm one thousand men. These were 
very inferior guns, more dangerous to the men hearing 
them than to the enemy. It was not until June, 1863, 
that they were replaced by Springfield rifled muskets. 
Colonel Wilson continued in command of the Four- 
teenth Regiment, being very careful of the health and 
comfort of his men, and enjoying their respect and con- 
fidence, until the early part of September, 1864, when, 
on account of ill health, induced by the climate and the 
exposure of camp life, he resigned, and was honorably 
discharged. Colonel Wilson was elected a member 
from Keene of the popular branch of the ITew Hamp- 
shire Legislature in 1868 and 1869, and was both years 
chairman of the standing committee on Military Affairs, 

COLONEL ALEXANDER GARDINER. 

Colonel Gardiner was born in the State of New York 
in 1833 ; graduated at Kimball Union Academy, Meri- 
den, !N^ew Hampshire; studied law and was admitted 
to the bar in 'Sew York City, when twenty-two years 
old, and soon after went to Kansas, with the intention 
of establishing himself in his professional business, and 
to assist in publishing a newspaper. His printing office 
was destroyed by the border ruffians, and the newspaper 
was abandoned. For a time he engaged in the border 
war, but on account of failing health returned home, 
and in the spring of 1859 opened an office and com- 
menced the practice of law at Claremont, New Hamp- 
shire, which he continued until the summer of 1862, 
when he was commissioned Adjutant of the Fourteenth 
Regiment. Colonel Robert Wilson, who commanded 
the regiment from its organization until the 6th of 



504 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

September, 1864, when he resigned, wrote of Colonel 
Gardiner : " In September Adjutant Gardiner was pro- 
moted to Major, on my recommendation as the man 
best fitted for the position, by education, talent and 
gentlemanly bearing. After we reached N'ew Orleans, 
in April, 1864, Major Gardiner was in command of the 
regiment much of the time. On the 13th of July we 
sailed from New Orleans, leaving Major Gardiner with 
four companies behind. I only met him again in the 
valley of the Shenandoah, at Berryville, on the 19th of 
August. On the night of the 21 st, the army was with- 
drawn from its position in front of the enemy near 
Charlestown, Va. The withdrawal of the pickets fell 
upon Major Gardiner as officer of the day. It was a 
delicate duty to perform, in the immediate face of the 
enemy, but was accomplished by him successfully. The 
lines had not been evacuated more than ten minutes 
before the enemy charged over our empty breastworks 
in full force, showing that they were on the alert for our 
movements. Major Gardiner was quite a nice man in 
his dress and personal appearance. He prided .himself 
on wearing the nicest fitting boots in the regiment, and 
we had many a laugh at the rivalry between Dr. Thayer, 
Major Gardiner and Adjutant Wright, who all had a 
weakness toward nice boots. After Gardiner was 
wounded and left on the ground at the battle of 
Opequan Creek, his handsome boots attracted the eye 
of a Johnnie Reb., who despoiled him of them, causing 
great pain and sufiering. But Johnny had only a short 
lease of the boots, as he was taken prisoner before night 
and compelled to strip himself of the boots and lug 
them into camp hung around his neck, himself march- 
ing barefooted over the flinty road." 

When Colonel Wilson was discharged. Brigadier' 
General Birge, commanding the brigade of which the 
Fourteenth Regiment formed a part, wrote the Gover- 




//!^u^ Ct. /Ot^^, 



{^a^^^^ 



FOURTEENTS REGIMENT. 505 

Bor of New Hampshire, requesting Major Gardiner's 
appointment over the Lieut. Colonel, who had held the 
office from the formation of the regiment. He wrote : 
"I am informed that Major Gardiner has been constantly 
on duty with his regiment since its organization. — 
During the time it has been under my command he has 
performed the duties of his office with fidelity, ability 
and zeal, and I believe him well qualified and competent 
for the rank recommended. In my opinion, his pro- 
motion is deserved, and will be for the benefit of the 
service and the regiment, and creditable to the State 
which he represents." This recommendation was fol- 
lowed, and Major Gardiner received his commission as 
Colonel only the day before the battle of Opequan 
Creek, near Winchester, Va., September 19, 1864, where 
he was mortally wounded. He died of his wounds on 
the 8th of the following month. His remains were 
brought to Claremont and buried with Masonic honors 
by Hiram Lodge. Prof. E. T. Rowe, of Kimball Union 
Academy, who had been Colonel Gardiner's teacher, 
and was for a time chaplain of his re^ment, preached 
an appropriate and impressive sermon, at the town hall, 
to a large concourse of people. His horse with the 
empty saddle, followed him to the grave. 

GBNBRAL SAMUEL A. DUNCAN. 

Brevet Major General Samuel A. Duncan was bom 
at Plainfield, Sullivan County, New Hampshire, June 
19, 1836. His parents were Samuel Bell and Ruth 
Ticknor Duncan. He finished his preparatory college 
course of study at Kimball TJnion Academy, in his 
native village, Meriden, and graduated at Dartmouth 
College, Hanover, New Hampshire, in 1858, taking the 
first honors of the class. After graduation he taught 
a high school two years at Quincy, Massachusetts, and 



506 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

was then called back to Dartmouth College as tutor, 
where he remained until the summer of 1862. After 
the terrible reverses of the Tlnion army at the Penin- 
sula, in 1862, Mr. Duncan announced to his friends his 
resolve to enter the army, and said he would go as a 
private, if necessary. He was soon tendered the position 
of Major of the Fourteenth Regiment, which he accept- 
ed, and was mustered in with the other field officers, in 
September, 1862. 

Major Duncan's regiment was engaged in provost 
duty at Washington, D. C, in the summer of 1863, 
when day by day the roar of conflict between the con- 
tending hosts of the Union and of the Rebellion, in 
their northward march toward Gettysburg, was borne 
upon the wind to his camp, his inactive life became 
extremely irksome. An opportunity for escape, and 
more honorable, because more active and dangerous, 
service opened. The "War Department inaugurated the 
policy of organizing colored troops, and with a view 
to officering them established a Military Board of which 
General Casey was President, to examine candidates 
for appointment. Major Duncan appeared before this 
Board in July, and passed for " Colonel " in " Class 1," 
ranking fi.rst out of about two hundred examinations 
then made. On the 16th of September, 1863, he was 
commissioned Colonel of the Fourth Regiment U. S. 
Colored Infantry, then organizing in Baltimore. The 
first parade of this regiment through the streets of 
Baltimore, soon after, was one of the prominent events 
in the war annals of that secession city. The streets 
and buildings along the route of the procession were 
crowded with curious and with frowning spectators. 
Contrary to the apprehensions of the "War Department 
the display passed off without any serious disturbance. 

On the 1st of October Colonel Duncan was ordered 
with his regiment to Fortress Monroe, and thence to 



FOVBTEENTE BEQIMENT. 507 

Yorktown, where it passed the winter — taking part in 
various expeditions in the Peninsula, prominent among 
which was General "Wistar's attempt on Richmond ; the 
surprise and capture of the enemy's camp at Charles 
City Court House, and the march to the aid of Kilpat- 
rick in his expedition from the Army of the Potomac 
against Richmond. In the latter case the telegraphic 
order from Washington to send a column to support 
Kilpatrick, reached Yorktown about three o'clock in 
the afternoon. At four the troops of Colonel Duncan's 
brigade were on the march, amid a drenching rain and 
through the pitchy blackness of the pine woods above 
"Williamsburg, and yet they made forty-six miles in 
twenty-three hours. 

In February, 1864, General Butler, then in command 
of the Department of Virginia and North Carolina, 
organized a brigade of Colored Troops, consisting of 
Colonel Duncan's regiment, one from Ohio, and two 
from Philadelphia, and he was placed in command. It 
was the Third Brigade of the Colored Division of the 
Eighteenth Corps. When the campaign of 1864 opened 
it was one of the very best officered and best drilled 
brigades in the entire army. 

General Smith commanded the Eighteenth Corps, 
and General Hinks was in command of the Colored 
Division. In the ascent of the James river on the 5th 
of May, Colonel Duncan's part of the programme was 
to land his brigade at City Point, where a desperate 
defens.e was anticipated, and preparations made accord- 
ingly ; but the small garrison surrendered without firing 
a shot. On the 15th of June General Smith, with the 
Eighteenth Corps, assaulted the defenses of Petersburg, 
on which occasion the colored troops showed great dash 
and courage. After the successful assault in the morn- 
ing upon the outer and temporary line of works, Colonel 
Duncan was ordered forward into the general line, and 



508 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

to hold his troops in readines to charge at any momentk 
The division, by the withdrawal, after the, engagement 
of the morning of one regiment, had been reduced to 
five regiments and two batteries, all which, save a single 
regiment, were under command of Colonel Duncan, 
General Hinks was seriously injured in the morning by 
his horse falling into a ditch, and could not afterward 
appear upon the field, and all the movements were made 
under the direction of Colonel Duncan — though not the 
senior colonel-r-by especial orders from General Hinks,. 
who retained the nominal command. For six hours the 
troops remained in the line in an exposed position, 
before the order to charge was given. "When it was 
given the colored troops jumped to their feet, and made 
as gallant a charge as ever veterans made, capturing six 
pieces of artillery among the trophies of the day. The 
casualties during the afternoon exceeded a hundreds 
To Colonel Duncan belonged much of the credit of the 
important results of that day's work. Two hours after 
the fight was over, at ten o'clock in the evening. Gen- 
eral Hinks went to Colonel Duncan and thanked him 
for the part he had taken, and said that for his work he 
should have the same rank as himself. He at once 
made the recommendation, which went forward favora- 
bly endorsed, but was not afterward heard from. 

At the attack on Battery Harrison, on the 29th of 
September, the colored troops under Colonel Duncan 
rendered gallant service. He lost two of his staff offi- 
cers on that day, and was himself severely wounded in 
the ankle. He was incapacitated for field service for 
five months. In general orders, dated October 11, 1864, 
General Butler, in command of the Department of Vir- 
ginia and North Carolina, said: "In the charge on the 
enemy's works by the colored division of the Eighteenth 
CorpS' at Spring Hill, l^ew Market — better men were 
never better led — ^better officers never led better men. 



FOURTEENTH REGIMENT. 509 

With hardly an exception, officers of colored troops 
have justified the care with which they have been 
selected. A few more such gallant charges, and to 
command colored troops will he the post of honor in 
the American armies." In this order Colonel Duncan 
was recommended for promotion. 

Colonel Duncan rejoined his command in North 
Carolina, and participated in the operation against 
Wilmington; and subsequently, in common with Gen- 
eral Terry's forces joined with Sherman in his move- 
ments against B^leigh- and General Johnston. > After 
the cessation of hostilities, he had local commands in 
JSTorth Carolina, and in the fall and winter of 1865 was 
in command of the line of forts surrounding Washing- 
ton and on the northern bank of the Potomac. Colonel 
Duncan was brevetted Brigadier General for gallantry 
at l^ew Market Heights, Va., Sept. 29, 1864; and 
subsequently, upon the recommendation of his com- 
manding officers, while yet in the field, was brevetted 
Major General of Volunteers. He was mustered out 
of the service on May 6th, 1866, and was afterward a 
Special Agent in the War Department. For the last 
two years he has been a principal Examiner in the 
United States Pension office. 

The Fourteenth Regiment arrived at Washington 
when no further force was required in the Army of the 
Potomac, or at Fortress Monroe, and was ordered to 
report to General Grover, and was assigned to a brigade 
which consisted of the Thirty-ninth Massachusetts, 
Fourteenth New Hampshire, Tenth Vermont, and 
Twenty-third Maine regiments. Infantry, and Tenth 
Massachusetts Battery. General Grover was soon 
ordered to other duty, and the command of the brig- 
ade devolved upon Colonel P. S. Davis, of the Thirty- 
ninth Massachusetts regiment. The winter was spent 



510 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

by the brigade in tbe arduous duty of picketing the 
river for an extent of forty miles. 

In the latter part of April, 1863, the regiment marched 
to Washington, and went into camp on the north side of 
the city, at the end of New York Avenue, where it 
remained' until February, 1864. During this time the 
regiment did provost duty in "Washington, the nature 
of which was responsible and various. It furnished 
guards for the Old Capitol Prison and Central Guard 
House, and a number of men for about ten other posts 
in the city. One company was detached and on duty 
at the principal landing for steamboats and other vessels 
from the South. The chief duty of this detachment 
was the suppression of contraband trade and the arrest 
of unauthorized travelers. Thus the men were kept 
perpetually busy. 

Early in February the regiment was ordered to Har- 
per's Ferry, and thence to Cumberland, eighty miles 
further west. They returned to Harper's Ferry, and 
then to "Washington, arriving there on the 25th. Soon 
after the regiment was ordered to the Department of the 
Gulf, and after a brief visit to New Hampshire, they 
sailed from New York for New Orleans, on the 20th of 
March, on two vessels. On their arrival they were 
quartered at Camp Parapet, and did miscellaneous duty 
there, at CarroUton, Jefferson City and along Lake 
Pontchartrain as far as Pass Manchae, and furnished a 
large daily detail for labor on the fortifications. On the 
7th of June the regiment reported to General Emery at 
Morganzia, near the mouth of the Eed river, and was 
attached to General Birge's brigade. General Birge 
was absent and the command devolved on Colonel 
Eobert Wilson, of the Fourteenth, and the command of 
the regiment upon Major Gardiner. This region was 
very unhealthy and malarious, and the men soon began 



FOURTEENTH REGIMENT. 511 

to sink under the combined evil influences of a hot and 
unhealthy climate and improper diet. 

On the 13th of July the Fourteenth took transporta- 
tion for the north, six companies under Colonel "Wilson, 
on one vessel, and the remaining four under Major 
Gardiner, on another. The regiment Mv&a not re-united 
until the 19th of August, at Berryville, where they 
joined Sheridan's army. Early in September Colonel 
"Wilson resigned on account of serious failure of health, 
and Major Gardiner was commissioned Colonel of the 
regiment. 

BATTLE OF WINCHESTEK. 

On the 19th of September occurred the battle at 
Opequan Creek, near Winchester, Va., in which the 
Fourteenth Regiment participated, and suffered the loss 
of many of its bravest and best officers and men. The 
army was in position two miles to the westward of the 
Opequan, in two lines of battle, with the Eighth Corps 
in reserve. The advance was made at half-past eleven 
o'clock, Birge's brigade on the right of the first line, 
and the Fourteenth New Hampshire on the right of the 
brigade. The rebels were driven from their position in 
splendid style, the brigades directly opposed to Birge's 
being completely broken. But it has been said the 
advance was too impetuous to permit the Union troops 
to hold the ground, for it brought them close upon a 
rebel battery which had been shelling them during the 
advance, and now at short range raked the line vrith 
erape and canister. The second line was a long distance 
in the rear, and the rebels were re-enforced by a division 
just arrived from Bunker Hill. The order was there- 
fore given to fall back in order, and firing. In falling 
back the Fourteenth Regiment sustained' a heavy loss. 
Thirteen officers of the twenty-one who went into the 



512 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

fight, and one hundred and thirty men, were killed, 
wounded or prisoners. Only eight were taken prison- 
ers, and some of these were wounded. Captains Chaffin 
and Fosgate, and Lieuts. Paull and Fiske were killed. 
Colonel Gardiner was mortally wounded, and died on 
the 8th of Octoher. Eight other officers, and over a 
hundred men were more or less wounded. The second 
line came up, and the regiments of the first line took 
their place with them. Irregular firing was kept up 
while the Eighth Corps was getting into position on the 
right to turn the left flank of the rebels, and connect 
with the cavalry who were advancing down the Martins- 
burg pike. At four o'clock the left of the enemy was 
completely turned, and the whole army advanced impet- 
uously, driving the rebels beyond "Winchester, taking 
twenty-five hundred prisoners, besides all their wound- 
ed, and five pieces of artillery. The command of the 
regiment devolved on Captain Tolman. 

On the 20th of September the army moved after the 
retreating rebels. On the 22d was fought the brilliant 
battle of Fisher's Hill, the Fourteenth advancing in 
splendid style against the breastworks, with the first 
line of Grover's division. Our army followed the rebels 
closely for a week, falling upon their rear, until they 
reached Harrisonburg, eighty miles from Winchester. 
Captain Ripley was made provost marshal, and the 
Fourteenth Regiment was detailed for provost duty 
in the town. 

THE BATTLE OF CEDAR CREEK 

Occurred on the 19th of October, in which the Four- 
teenth Regiment behaved so bravely as to win the 
approbation of General Birge. The battle commenced 
before sunrise, the rebels under General Early advanc- 
ing with a heavy force from Fisher's Hill upon the 



FOURTEENTH REGIMENT. 513 

Union army, overwlielming and driving it back in some 
confusion, by greatly superior numbers. Later in the 
forenoon the advance of the rebel army was checked, 
and the Union army held their positioflr. General 
Sheridan had been in Washington, and reached Win- 
chester that morning. From there he rode with all 
possible haste, when he heard the artillery from Cedar 
creek, and reached the army between ten and eleven 
o'clock. He at once made preparations for recovering 
the position that had been lost. While the rebels were 
kept in check by a ceaseless cannonade, the main line 
of the army was withdrawn and re-formed across the 
Winchester pike, a mile north of Middletown, confront- 
ing the rebel army. Cavalry was on each wing, and the 
three corps were arranged in one long line of battle 
between. At three o'clock the line was ordered to 
advance. They met the rebels securely posted behind 
stone walls, dislodged them after hard fighting, drove 
them from wall to wall, from crest to crest; and by 
sunset had driven them beyond the ground from which 
the army had been forced in the morning. The cavalry 
coming in on the right and left, pursued the enemy up 
the valley to Fisher's Hill, and the next morning follow- 
ed them to Mount Jackson. The rebel army left every 
thing in its flight — forty-eight cannon, ambulances, 
wagons, and five thousand stands of arms. The cavalry 
brought in two thousand prisoners, which were all they 
could take care of. The day that opened with disaster, 
closed with such a victory as is not often seen. The 
total loss in this engagement was reported as four 
thousand and eighty-six. The Fourteenth Regiment 
lost eight killed, fifty-five wounded, and sixteen prison- 
ers. Among those captured was Captain Eipley, who 
was in command of the regiment. He was taken 
prisoner soon after sunrise. The command of the 
regiment fell upon Captain Marston, which he retained 



614 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

until the middle of December, when Captain Tolman 
was promoted to major. The same month Carroll D. 
"Wright was promoted from Adjutant to Colonel, and 
assumed command. 

The first week in January the division to which the 
Fourteenth Regiment was attached moved to Savannah, 
and arrived there about the middle of the month, just 
as the last corps of Sherman's army was leaving the city, 
and General Grover assumed command of the district, 
which included the eastern part of the State. The 
Fourteenth, with other regiments, was quartered in the 
city on provost duty. Here the regiment remained 
until the 6th of May, when they marched to Augusta. 
While there they guarded Jeff. Davis, and the prison- 
ers taken with him, to the steamer that carried him 
to Savannah. The regiment was ordered to Savannah 
early in June, to be mustered out, where it remained a 
month before transportation was obtained for the north. 

In March Colonel "Wright and Lieut. Colonel Barker 
having resigned. Captain 0. H. Marston, Company K, 
was promoted to Lieut. Colonel, and commanded the 
regiment until it was mustered out. Surgeon William 
Henry Thayer was appointed medical director of the 
second division, Nineteenth Corps, in February, and 
Assistant Surgeon Marshall Perkins had charge of the 
regiment from that time. Lieut. C. Fred Webster, regi- 
mental quartermaster, was detailed as assistant post 
quartermaster. Captain ba Berry, Jr., had command of 
Camp Distribution during the spring. Lieut. M. M. 
Holmes commanded the camp of colored refugees. 
Lieut. A. F. Hussey was detailed as assistant street 
commissioner. Captain George F. Blanchard was as- 
sistant adjutant general of the first brigade, after 
December, 1864. A large number of oflicers and men 
were detailed for responsible duties, and the regiment 



FOURTEENTH REGIMENT. 



515 



had the reputation of being faithfal, brave and reliable, 
in every position. 

The Fourteenth Regiment lost by death above two 
hundred men and officers. Seventy of these fell in bat- 
tle, or died of their wounds. The remainder sank 
under disease brought on in the discharge of their duty, 
in unhealthy climates, and among them were many val- 
uable and beloved officers. 

The Governor and Council caused a suitable monu- 
ment to be erected near "Winchester, Va. It was 
dedicated on the 9th of April, 1866, with impressive 
ceremonies, and bears this inscription : 

" New Hampshire erects this Monument to the mem- 
ory of her brave sons of the Fourteenth Regiment, who 
fell in battle, September 19th, 1864, upon this field, and 
are here buried in one common grave." 



Captain W. H. Chaffln, 
Captain W. A. Poagate. 
Lieutenant H. S. Panll. 
liientenant J. A. Fiske. 
Sergeant C. C. Wilson. 
Sergeant Q. W. Petch. 
Sergeant M. McCnrdy. 
Sergeant k. A. Baker. 
Corporal N. P. Snst. 
Corporal D. W. Chase. 
Corporal M. Allen. 



Colonel A. Gardiner. 
Lientenant A. B. Colbum. 
Lieutenant O. H. Stone. 
Corporal 0. Straw. 
Corporal H. F. Brown. 



Corporal G. W. Hazen. 
Corporal S. Taaker. 
Corporal C. W. Noyes. 
Private N. Wyman. 
Private S. H. Tonng. 
Private G. Perrigo. 
Private G. L. 'Wetlierbee. 
Private F. B. Andrews. 
Private H. L. Haynes. 
Private A. £. Boyd. 
Private C. L. Homan. 

MORTALLY WOUNDED. 

Corporal G. W. looker. 
Private L. Willard. 
Private L. E. Bent. 
Private L. O. Merrill. 
Private E. Vamey. 



Private 
Private 
Private 
Private 
Private 
Private 
Private 
Private 
Private 



M. Marston. 
G. T. Souther. 
W. A. Scott. 
L. Parker. 
0. A. Barnes. 
S. Waters. 
H. 0. Baker. 
D. J. Cameron. 
D. H. Phelpg. 



Private 0. B. Coihkn. 
Private H. Atwood. 
Private A. Harriman. 



516 TEE QBEAT REBELLION. 



FIFTEENTH REGIMENT. 



This was the first regiment raised in i^ew Hampshire 
under the call of the President for three hundred 
thousand nine months' troops. Early in October it was 
determined to organize one regiment of nine months' 
men to each of the three congressional districts, and the 
recruits then enrolled were ordered into camp at Con- 
cord. Those coming first into the rendezvous, without 
regard to residence, were at once ordered into a regi- 
ment under Colonel J. "W. Kingman, of Durham, and 
were designated the Fifteenth I^ew Hampshire Yolun- 
teers. The following are the field, staff and company 
officers, and their official record : 

FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS. 

Colonels — John W. Kingman, of Durham. 

Mustered out August 13, 1863. 

Lieut. Colonels — George "W. Frost, of Newmarket. 

Besigned Feb. 14, 1863. 

Henry W. Blair, of Plymouth. 

Mustered out Aug. 13, 1863. 

Majors — George "W. Frost, of Newmarket. 

Promoted to Lieut. Colonel Oct. 7, 1862. 

Henry W. Blair, of Plymouth. 

Promoted to Lieut. Colonel'April 8, 1863. 

John Aldrich, of Gilford. 

Mustered out August 13, 1863. 
Adjutant — ^Edward E. Pinkham, of Laconia. 

Mustered out August 13, 1863. 
Quartermaster — Ira A. Moody, of Dover. 

Mustered out August 13, 1863. 

Surgeons — Jeremiah F. Hall, of Wolfeborough. 

Besigned Jan. 19, 1863. 

Carl H. Horsch, of Dover. 

Mustered out August 13, 1863. 



FIFTEENTH REGIMENT. S17 

Ass't Surgeons — ^Benjamin N. Towle, of IN'ewinarket. 

Mustered out Augost 18, 1863. 

Joseph E. Janvrin, of Exeter. 

Mustered out August 13, 1863. 

Chaplain — ^Edwin M. Wheelock, of Dover. 

Resigned July 18, 1863. 

Sergeant Majors — John 0. "Wallingford, of Dover. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. Jan. 18, 1863. 

Jeremiah H. "W". Tebbetts, of Rochester. 

Mustered out August 13, 1863. 

Quartermaster Sergeant — George "W. Hobbs. 

Mustered out August 13, 1863. 

Commissary Sergeant — Josiah Kimball. 

Discharged for disability May 16, 1863. 

Hospital Steward — ^Willard C. Kempton, of Plainfield. 

Mustered out August 18, 1863. 



COMPANY OFFICERS. 

Co. A. — Captains — John Aldrich, of Gilford. 

Promoted to Major August 8, 1863. 

Thomas Coggswell, jr., of Gilmanton. 

Mustered out August 13, 1863. 

First Lieuts. — Thos. Coggswell, jr., of Gilmanton. 

Promoted to Captain April 8, 1863. 

John B. Hendley, of Alton. 

Mustered out August 18, 1863. 

Second Lieuts. — John B. Hendley, of Alton. 

Promoted to First Lieut. August 8, 1863. 

Charles "W. Pickering, of Gilford. 

Mustered out August 13, 1863. 

Co. B. — Captain — John "W, Ela, of Plymouth. 

Mustered out August 18, 1863. 

First Lieut. — ^Henry D. Wyatt, of Campton. 

Mustered out August 13, 1863. 

Second Lieut. — James A. Page, of Haverhill. 

Must^ed out August 18, 1863. 

Co. C. — Captain — ^Moses Lang,. of Bath. 

Mustered out August 18, 1863. 

First Lieut. — Charles S. Hazeltine, of Littleton. 

Mustered ojit August 13, 1863. 

Second Lieut. — ^Alvin C. Bean, of Enfield. 

Mustered out August 18, 1868. 



518 THE GREAT REBELLIOlH. 

Co. D. — Captain — Jonathan H. Johnson, of Deerfield. 

Mustered oat August 18, 1863. 

First Lieut. — Jeremiah C. Chadwick, of Deerfield. 

Mustered out August 18, 1863. 

Second Lieut. — W. M. Durgin, of Northwood. 

Mustered out August 18, 1863. 

Co. E. — Captain — William E. Stearns, of Manchester. 

Mustered out August 13, 1863. 

First Lieut. — James F. Parker, of Litchfield. 

Mustered out'August 13, 1863. 

Second Lieut. — ^Francis A. Wood, of HoUis. 

Mustered out August 13, 1868. 

Co. F. — Captain — ^William Gordon, of Canaan. 

Mustered out August 13, 1863. 

First Lient. — Sylvester Martin, of Grafton. 

Mustered out August 18, 1863. 

Second Lieut. — Stephen Colby, of Springfield. 

Mustered out August 13, 1863. 

Co. G. — Captain — ^Lewis Osgood, of Pittsfield. 

Mustered out August 13, 1863. 

First Lieuts. — Thomas M. Huse, of Barnstead. 

Resigned Feb. 23, 1863. 

Joseph G. Ayers, of Northfield. 

Must«red out August 13, 1863. 

Second Lieuts. — Joseph G. Ayers, of Northfield. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Mtirch 1, 1863. 

Christ. C. Pickering, of Barnstead. 

Mustered out August 13, 1863. 

Co. H. — Captain — Jacob B. Sanborn, of Sanbornton. 

Mustered out August 13, 1868. 

First Lieut. — ^Alfred B. Seavey, of Gilford. 

Mustered out August 13, 1868. 

Second Lieut. — W. Perkins, of Londonderry. 

Mustered out August 13, 1863. 

Co. L — Captain — George E. Pinkham, of Rochester. 

Mustered out August 18, 1863. 

First Lieut. — Alvah M. Kimball, of Rochester. 

Resigned Jan. 15, 1868. 

James D. Moore, of Middleton. 

Mustered out August 13, 1863. 
Second Lieuts. — James D. Moore, of Middleton. 
Promoted to First Lieut. Jan. 18, 1863. 
John O. Wallingford, of Dover. 

Mustered out August 18, 1863. 



FIFTEENTH REGIMENT. 519 

Co. K. — Captain — ^Benjamin F. Hall, of Salem. 

Mustered out August IS, 1863. 

Mrst Lieut. — ^Elbridge Or. "Wood, of Hampstead. 

Mustered out August 13, 1868. 

Second Lieut. — Wallace T. Larkin, of Chester. 

Discharged on account of promotion, Aug. 11, 1863. 
COLONEI, JOHN W. KINGMAN. 

Colonel Kingman was born at Barrington, Strafford 
County, New HampsHre, in 1821. His ancestors, on 
both sides, were connected with, or descended from 
Elder William Brewster, of Mayflower memory. He 
fitted for college at Phillips Exeter Academy, and grad- 
uated at Harvard in 1843. He studied law in the office 
of Daniel Webster, in Boston, and commenced practice 
in Cincinnati, Ohio; but soon returned to Dover, N". H., 
where he entered into a partnership with Hon. Daniel 
M. Christie, and continued in the practice of his pro- 
fession until the commencement of the war. In Octo- 
ber, 1862, he was commissioned Colonel of the Fifteenth 
Regiment. Its terra of service was nominally nine 
months, but extended from July, 1862, when the com- 
panies were raised, until August 13, 1863, when they 
were mustered out. The time was too short for any 
regiment to distinguish itself. It, however, bore an 
important part in the campaign of Port Hudson, and 
never failed to do all that could reasonably be expected 
of it. He requested the officers, before leaving New 
Hampshire, to sign a regimental temperance pledge, to 
bind them all, during their term of service, to the strict- 
est sobriety ; and every officer signed it, and every man 
of them kept it with commendable integrity. As a 
natural result, wherever the regiment was stationed, 
they had the reputation of being the least disorderly regi- 
ment in the army. When at CarroUton, near New 
Orleans, where were thirty-five regiments, the provost 



520 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

marshal told Colonel Kingman that the Fifteenth New 
Hampshire was the only regiment there that had never 
had an officer or man arrested by his guard. Colonel 
Kingman early obtained the confidence and affisction of 
his men, and retained it to the end. On the 27th of 
May, 1863, in the unsuccessful assault on Port Hudson, 
the Second Division, of which the Fifteenth Eegiment 
formed a part, commanded by General T. "W". Sherman, 
lost nearly every officer in it, and Colonel Kingman was 
left in command. It was in this engagement that Gen- 
eral Sherman lost a leg, and General Dow was badly 
wounded. Colonel Kingman enjoyed the intimacy of 
both these brave officers; but after they left General 
Banks sent General Dwight — a man not distinguished 
for courage or sobriety — to command the division. 
It was intimated that his method of showing his prowess 
was to order his officers under arrest, and at one time he 
had nearly all of them deprived of their commands. 
Colonel Porter, of the Fourteenth Maine, and Colonel 
Kingman were among the first whose swords he -de- 
manded. They were never tried, nor were there any 
charges preferred against them. General Banks soon 
removed General Dwight and ordered all the officers 
back to their commands. 

After being mustered out with his regiment, Colonel 
Kingman made several unsuccessful attempts to again 
enter the service, having a desire to do his share toward 
finishing up the rebellion. He returned to civil life and 
the practice of his profession. In April, 1869, he re- 
ceived from President Grant the appointment of Asso- 
ciate Justice of the Supreme Court of the Territory of 
Wyoming, which office he now holds. 

The Fifteenth Regiment was mustered into the United 
States service on the 12th of November, 1862, and 
received its colors from the hand of Governor Berry. 



FIFTEENTH REOIMENT. 521 

On the lath, the regiment left Concord, under orders to 
report to General N. P. Banks, at New York City, and 
reached there next morning. The fore part of Decem- 
ber the regiment sailed on three different vessels for 
New Orleans, the last detachment arriving there on the 
26th of December, and being reunited went into camp 
at CarroUton. On the 28th of January, 1863, the regi- 
ment moved to Camp Parapet, about two and a half 
miles from CarroUton. It formed a part of the first 
brigade, second division, Nineteenth Army Corps. The 
brigade was composed of the Sixth Michigan, One 
Hundred and Twenty-eighth New York, Fifteenth New 
Hampshire, and Twenty-sixth Connecticut, and was 
commanded by General Neal Dow. The two regiments 
first named were three years' troops ; the two last nine 
months. Brigadier General T. W. Sherman commanded 
the division. Here the regiment remained doing camp 
and guard duty, furnishing details of officers and men 
for different purposes, and with but few changes in the 
organization, until the spring of 1863. 

On the 20th of May the regiinent embarked on board 
steamers and sailed for Springfield Landing, where 
it arrived on the 22d and joined its brigade. On the 
23d they were joined by the Second Brigade of the 
division. They moved cautiously through the woods 
two and a half miles toward Port Hudson ; formed in 
line of battle, advanced a short distance and halted for 
the night. On the 24th they again moved toward the 
rebel works, expecting to encounter a rebel force at 
some earthworks about two miles from their main line 
of defenses, but found them abandoned. The picket 
line, supported by Companies D and E, advanced to 
within about a thousand yards of the enemy's defensive 
works, consisting of a parapet, seven miles in length, 
extending from the river below Port Hudson to a bayou 
above, with outer works commanding all avenues of 



522 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

approach; and a heavy growth of timber had been 
felled for a distance of half a mile from the parapet. 
These works were held by upward of eight thousond 
men, ■ and their position was worth at least twenty 
thousand more, commanded by Major General Gardner, 
formerly of the regular army. On the morning of the 
25th of May, the Nineteenth Army Corps lay before 
this rebel stronghold. General Sherman's division 
consisted of two brigades, General Dow's and General 
Nicholson's, each numbering about twelve hundred 
men. General Dow had the right and General Nichol- 
son the left of the division. 

On the 26th of May, four companies from the Fif- 
teenth, with detachments from other regiments, went 
to the front, to burn some buildings occupied by the 
rebels, which was accomplished without loss to the 
regiment. At six o'clock, p. m.,' four companies. A, D, 
E and K, under Major Aldrich, were ordered to the 
front, to support the pickets. 

On the the 27th an assault was ordered along the 
whole line. The four companies under Major Aldrich, 
thrown out on the flanks as sharpshooters and skirmish- 
ers, did good execution in picking off the rebel artillery 
men. The other six companies formed a part of the 
assaulting column of the brigade, commanded by General 
Dow, and led by Generals Sherman and Dow. The 
brigade covered the south end of the eastern portion 
of the enemy's works, and lay in line of battle , about 
three-fourths of a mile from the enemy. The interven- 
ing distance was level. Just in front was a long dense 
belt of woods, some sixty rods in depth ; then an open- 
ing about forty rods wide and one hundred and fifty 
long, from right to left; then woods again, between 
this opening and the enemy. There was a gap in 
th« woods, about forty rods wide, leading direct from 
this cleared ground to a broad level space, on the fur- 



FIFTEENTH REGIMENT. 623 

tier side of which was the ear,th bank of the enemy. 
The distance from the line of trees nearest the rebels 
to their works was about a quarter of a mile. On the 
right of this front was a deep ravine, with steep, irregu- 
lar sides, running direct to the enemy's works, forming 
a right angle at the point of intersection. At one 
o'clock, p. M., the brigade was drawn up in the first 
clearing in front of its position. On the extreme left 
were several batteries of artillery, which played through 
the gap in the woods upon the rebel works. The fore- 
noon had been passed in sharp skirmishing along the 
whole leilgth of the lines, the light troops covering 
themselves with stumps, bushes, and every thing that 
afforded shelter, had pushed, in many places nearly up 
to the rebel works. For two days the enemy had not 
shown himself outside his defenses. The air was filled 
with minnie balls, cannon shot and shell, which, how- 
ever, did but little damage to either side. The artillery 
opened at one o'clock in earnest, and for half an hour . 
thundered upon the enemy. The fir6 was tremendous, 
and the enemy replied with an incessant shower of 
every conceivable missile. Soon a long train of wagons, 
loaded with bags of cotton, boards, and long poles, 
for bridging the ditch, and escorted by three hundred 
negroes, burst through the smoke and hurried to 
the front. The brigade \^as awaiting the order to 
advance. It was soon given, and they went forward at 
the double-quick, and met a terribly deadly fire from 
the enemy. As they pressed on over fences and through 
scattering trees, the men fell in fearful numbers. An 
attempt was made to correct the alignment which had 
become broken, but it was found impossible, and the 
confusion soon became inextricable, so murderous was 
the fijre of the enemy. The bravest hurried to the front, 
the cowards to the rear ; the whole knew not what to 
do; to retreat was unthought of, and finally the whole 



524 TEE OBEAT BEBELLION. 

brigade was swept away to the right, and went into the 
ravine. Those in the extreme advance — and the Fif- 
teenth was largely represented there — seeing their sup- 
port disappear, leaped into the gorge themselves, while 
their ofGlcers hurried back to arouse the middle and rear. 
General Dow had been wounded and carried from the 
field. There was no possibility of reforming the bri- 
gade; nothing could be done but push on, surmount the 
parapet, if possible, and attack the enemy in his teeth. 
A second advance was made, at double-quick, and when 
in perfect range the enemy opened his fire, concentrated 
from more than a mile of his works, direct upon the 
column, but they did not falter. Lieut. Colonel Blair 
was in command of the advance. As he started the 
second time he asked General Sherman for instructions. 
"Lead them ahead, straight ahead, dead on the enemy's 
works," were the orders he received. The advance was 
unsuccessful, and the troops were obliged to fall back to 
the ravine in order to reform. General Sherman, having 
been severely wounded, was taken from the field by men 
of the Fifteenth. The command devolved upon Colonel 
Cowles, of the One Hundred and Twenty-eighth New 
York, who rallied the men and attempted another 
advance, which was also unsuccessful. Colonel Cowles 
ordered a retreat, and fell, mortally wounded, about 
forty rods outside the enemy's works. There was one 
more attempt to gain the works. A common soldier 
came marching along alone, leading a white horse with 
his right hand, waving the stars and stripes with his left, 
and calling upon his comrades to rally, and rally they 
did. The bank of the ravine was instantly alive with 
soldiers, the parapet was ablaze again, and the men fell 
fearfully fast; still they pressed on. The center and 
rear of the column did not waver. The advance hurried 
forward, was nearing the parapet ; it was not ten rods off; 
here Lieut, Colonel Blair feU, severely wounded in the 



FIFTEENTH MEGIMENT. 525 

arm. The brave fellow with the white horse, pressed 
forward a few steps beyond, and fell, blood streaming 
from his mouth. The men who rusbed forward bad 
nearly all fallen, and witb this ended tbe figbt. At 
nigbt the troops were withdrawn. Tbe loss was very 
beavy, one fourtb of tbe figbting men of tbe corps. 

On the 13tb of June fifty men from tbe Fifteentb, 
under Lieuts. Seavey and Perkins, of Company H, witb 
the same number from tbe Twenty-sixtb Connecticut, 
all commanded by Lieut. Seavey, made a demonstra- 
tion against the enemy's works. Before advancing tbey 
were addressed by Colonel Clark, commanding tbe brig- 
ade, wbo told them if there was a man among them 
who feared to die, be then bad an opportunity to honor- 
ably retire, but that tbey must choose tben or not, at all. 
JTot a man of tbe Fifteentb left tbe ranks, and but one of 
tbe Twenty-sixth Connecticut. They were then deployed 
as skirmisbers and ordered to advance across tbe scene 
of tbe late battle, coolly and steadily, toward the rebel 
parapet, up to it, and over it. Tbey obeyed their 
instructions until many of them had fallen, when, not 
being supported, they laid down, and covering them- 
selves as tbey could, they fought away until dark. 
Tbere never was a braver act than the charge of that 
line of skirmisbers. Tbe rebels were struck witb 
admiration, and, after tbey were well up, issued orders 
to kill no more such brave fellows, but by a sally to 
endeavor to capture tbem. But for this forbearance of 
tbe enemy probably not a man could have escaped. 
Tbe loss of tbe regiment in this affair was thirteen 
killed and wounded, or more than one-fourth of tbe 
number engaged. 

Tbe next day another attack was made upon tbe 
enemy's works. Soon after sunrise tbe Fifteenth com- 
manded by Lieut. Colonel Blair, followed by tbe Twenty- 
sixtb Connecticut, marched up tbe road, from a position 



526 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

near the river which had been reached by a circuitous 
route of six miles, to within seven hundred yards of 
the rebel works. Here they formed in line of battle 
and advanced about four hundred yards, under a heavy 
artillery fire, and came upon a concealed ravine, filled 
with fallen timber, underbrush and briar vines, which 
was impassable. There was no path to the right or the 
'left, and after some hesitation the regiments plunged 
intb the gorge. Some struggled through and came up 
on the other side, but to no purpose. The division 
remained there during the day, intensely tortured by 
heat, hunger and thirst, under the fire of the enemy, but 
the men were so well protected by the underbrush that 
but few were harmed. At night the command was 
withdrawn. The loss in the Fifteenth was two officers 
and twenty-four men wounded. Lieut. Colonel Blair 
was hit by a minnie ball on the arm previously wounded. 
Captain J. H. Johnson, of Company D, was prostrated 
by exertion and heat, and died at his home at Deerfield, 
on the 14th of October. Colonel Clark, who command- 
ed the brigade on the 14th of June, in his report of the 
engagement said of the Fifteenth New Hampshire EiBgi- 
ment: "Both officers and men conducted themselves in 
a manner worthy of American soldiers. The nine 
months' men have demonstrated, by their gallant con- 
duct, that they can be relied on in any emergency." 

The siege of Port Hudson continued, both armies 
erecting batteries and strengthening their works, for 
several days, without either molesting the other. At 
length fire was opened simultaneously from each side, 
and continued for several days ; the rebel guns were dis- 
mounted and the rebel fiag shot away several times, and 
finally not raised again, though no breach was made 
sufficient to warrant an attempt to take the works by 
storm. After the receipt of the news of the fall of 



FIFTEENTH REGIMENT. 527 

Vicksburg, General Gardner unconditionally surrender- 
ed Port Hudson to General Banks. 

On the 26tli of July tlie regiment turned over its 
camp and ordnance stores and started on its way home. 
It reached Concord on the 8th of August, and was mus- 
tered out, paid and discharged on the 13th. When the 
regiment was mustered out of sei"vice, though there 
were thirty-nine officers and seven hundred and two 
enlisted men whose names were borne upon the rolls, 
less than thirty officers, and not four hundred and fifty 
enlisted men were fit for duty. The siege of Port Hud- 
son and the climate of Louisiana had thus sadly thinned 
the ranks. 



528 THE GREAT REBELLION. 



SIXTEENTH REGIMENT. 



The Sixteenth Regiment was raised under the same 
call of the President for three hundred thousand nine 
months' men as the Fifteenth. Its muster in was com- 
pleted on the 1st of November, 1862. The following 
were its field, staff and company officers, with the 
official record of each : 

FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS. 

Colonel — James Pike, of Sanbornton. 

' Mastered out Aug. 20, 1863. 

Lieut. Colonel — ^Henry W. Fuller, of Concord. 

Mustered out Aug. 20, 1863. 
Majors — Henry "W. Fuller, of Concord. 

Promoted to Lieut. Colonel Nov. 1, 1862. 
Samuel Davis, Jr., of Warner. 

Mustered out Aug. 20, 1863. 
Adjutant — Luther T. Townsend, of Salem. 

Mustered out Aug. 20, 1863. 

Quartermaster — ^Albert H. Drown, of Fisherville. 

Mustered out Aug. 20, 1863. 
Surgeon — Thomas Sanborn, of JS'ewport. 

Resigned June 13, 1868. 
Assistant Surgeons — Cyrus M. Fiske, of Bradford. 

Mustered out Aug. 20, 1863. 
Sylvester Campbell. 

Died at Camp Parapet, Feb. 6, 1863. 
Herbert Sleeper, of Grantham. 

Captured June 28, 1863. Exchanged. Mustered out Aug. 30, 1863. 

Chaplain— R. M. Manley, of Northfield. 

Mustered out Aug. 20, 1863. 

Sergeant Majors — Frank B. Modica, of Henniker. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. March 1, 1863. 

Charles J. "Wright, of Pelham. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. June 20, 1863. 

Quartermaster Sergeant — G. M. "Wilkins, of Henniker. 

Promoted to Second Lieut. April 25, 1863. 



SIXTEENTH REGIMENT. 529 

Commissary Sergeant — ^David D. Smith, of Concord. 

Mustered out Aug. 20, 1863. 

Hospital Stewards — ^Paul S. Adams, of Newport. 

Discharged for disability July 2, 1863. 

Clarence S. "Wilkins, of Warner. 

Mastered out Aug. 20, 1863. 
COMPANY OFFICERS. 

Co. A. — Captain — ^Elias F. Smith of Lebanon. 

Mustered out August 20, 1863. 

First Lieut. — ^Bela Sawyer, of Lyme. 

Mustered out August 20, 1868. 

Second Lieut. — Charles S. Cooper, of Concord. 

Mustered out August 20, 1868. 

Co. B. — Captain — Albert J. Hersey, of Wolfeborough. 

Mustered out August 20, 1863. 

First Lieuts. — O. B. Burnham, of Hillsborough. 

Resigned Feb. 4, 1863. 

Albert W. "Wiggin, of Wolfeborough. 

Mustered out August 20, 1863. 

Second Lieuts.^^. W. "Wiggin, of Wolfeboro'. 

Promoted to First Lieut Feb. 6, 1863. 

Alvah S. Libby, of Wolfeborough. 

Mustered out August 20, 1863. 

Co.' C. — Captains — ^Aaron A. Clark, of Wilton. 

Mustered out August 20, 1863. 

First Lieut.— Henry M. Mills, of Milford. 

Mustered out August 20, 1863. 

Second Lieut. — Joseph E. O'Donnell, of Mason. 

Mustered out August 20, 1863. 

Co. D. — Captain — ^Daniel E. Howard, of HopMnton. 

Mustered out August 20, 1863. 

First Lieut. — Charles H. Herbert, of Concord. 

Promoted to Captain and Commissary of Subsistence U. S. V. Jan. 20, 1863. 

Second Lieut. — ^Robert S. Davis, of Concord. 

Mustered out August 20, 1863. 

Co. E. — Captain — Jonathan P. Sanborn", of Franklin. 

Mustered out August 20, 1863. 

First Lieut. — ^David E. Burbank, of Webster. 

Resigned July 18, 1863. 

Second Lieut. — ^Prescott Jones, of Wilmot. 

Died at CarroUton, La., Jan. 11, 1863. 



530 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

Co. F. — Captain — Charles H. "Woods, of Fitzwilliam. 

Mustered out August 20, 1863. 

First Lieut. — ^Edgar E. Adams, of Grantham. 

Mustered out August 20, 1868. 

Second Lieuts. — John S. Baker. 

Died March 17, 1863. 

Frank B. Modica, of Henniker. 

Mustered out August 20, 1863 

Co. Q-. — Captain — &. "W. Bosworth, of Lyndeborough. 

Mustered out August 20, 1863. 

First Lieut. — ^Barton A. Ballou, of Weare. 

Mustered out August 20, 1868. 

Second Lieut. — M. L. Colburn, of New Boston. 

Mustered out August 20, 1863. 

Co. H. — Captain — John L. Rice, of Cornish. 

Mustered out August 20, 1863. 

First Lieut. — ^Proctor D. "Ward, of Bradford. 

Mustered out August 20, 1863. 

Second Lieut. — ^Philip C. Bean, of Warner. 

Mustered out August 20, 1863. 

Co. L — Captains — ^David Bufium, 2d, of Swanzey. 

Died at New Orleans, La., June 19, 1863. 

Judson "Wilkins, of "Washington. 

Mustered out August 20, 1863. 
First Lieuts. — Judson Wilkins, of Washington. 

Promoted to Captain June 20, 1868. 

Brooks K. Webber, of Antrim. 

Mustered out August 20, 1863. 

Second Lieuts. — ^Brooks K. "Webber, of Antrim. 
Promoted to First Lieut. June 20, 1863. 

Charles J. "Wright, of Pelham. 

Mustered out August 20, 1868. 
Co. K. — Captain — Joseph K. Thatcher, of Portsmouth. 

Mustered out August 20, 1868. 

First Lieut. — George T. "Wildes, of Portsmouth. 

Died at Xew Orleans, La., April 20, 1863. 

Second Lieut. — ^Wm. A. Haven, of Portsmouth. 

Mustered out August 20, 1868. 

COLONEL JAMES PIKE. 

Colonel Pike was born at Salisbury, Massachusetts, in 
November, 1818 ; was educated at the "Wesleyan "Univer- 
sity, in Connecticut; is a minister of the Methodist 



SIXTEENTH REGIMENT. 531 

Episcopal Church, having commenced preaching in 
1841, and had been presiding elder. He was elected a 
member of the Thirty-fourth Congress from the First 
New Hampshire District, in 1855, and was re-elected for 
a second term in 1857, and was a member of the Com- 
mittee on Enrolled Bills. In October, 1862, he was 
commissioned Colonel of the Sixteenth Eegiraent IS&w 
Hampshire Volunteer Infantry, and served with it 
during its term of enlistment. His nlilitary record is 
identical with the history of that regiment. He is a 
clergyman of considerable ability, stands high with the 
Methodist denomination; is Presiding Elder of the 
Dover District of the New Hampshire Conference, and 
was one of a committee to investigate the affairs of the 
Methodist Book Concern, of New York. 

The Sixteenth Regiment joined the Banks Expedition 
and sailed from New York on the 6th of December, 
1862, on two separate vessels. The first detachment 
arrived at New Orleans on the 20th, and were joined by 
the second on the Ist of January, 1863. The regiment 
remained at Carrollton and in the defenses of New 
Orleans until the advance on Port Hudson. On the 
11th of January Second Lieut. Prescott Jones, of Com- 
pany E, a beloved young officer, died of disease. On 
the 17th of March Second Lieut. John S. Baker, of 
Company F, died of fever. He was one of the most 
competent and promising line officers in the regiment. 

On the 17th of March an advance was made to within 
six miles of Port Hudson, in which the Sixteenth par- 
ticipated. Three musicians of the regiment were cap- 
tured by the enemy, while sleeping in a slave cabin 
belonging to a plantation, the female occupants of the 
house on which having signaled the rebels. 

On the 18th of April the regiment was ordered by 
General Banks to embark on gunboats and co-operate in 



532 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

an attack upon Fort Burton, at Butte a la Rose, a fort 
some seventy-five miles beyond Brafehear. This fort was 
situated in a cove on the Alchafalaya river, at a confluence 
of bayous, and its possession, after the triumphant ad- 
vance of our army to Opelousas, was of importance, as a 
protection to the rear of the columns ; and immediately 
after its capture the gunboat Arizona opened communi- 
cation with Admiral Faragut, on Eed river. The Six- 
teenth, acting as sharpshooters, was distributed among 
four gunboats. Arrived at Fort Burton, on the 19th, a 
short engagement took place, and the confederate flag 
was hauled down, the fort surrendered to the commander 
of the squadron, who took possession of the works, 
arsenal and barracks and sent the garrison prisoners to 
I7ew Orleans. The Sixteenth remained here, a most 
pestilent location, surrounded by dense forests and 
impenetrable swamps, six weeks. Disease was contract- 
ed from which many of the men subsequently died. 
The regiment had been in command of the Lieut. 
Colonel since leaving New Orleans, Colonel Pike having 
been left there quite out of health. A short time before 
leaving Fort Burton he arrived and assumed command, 
which he retained until the muster out of the regiment. 
On the 30th of May the regiment received orders 
from General Banks to join his forces at Port Hudson. 
Before leaving they burned the barracks surrendered by 
the rebels, and some other buildings, this having been a 
shipping point for cotton, sugar, &c., and the guns of 
the fort were shipped on board transports sent up from 
Brashear City. The rebel pickets were close upon the 
retiring troops, and had their stay been prolonged a day 
later they would have been captured, and they were 
believed at New Orleans to have been "gobbled up" by 
the advancing enemy. From Algiers the sick of the 
regiment were sent to New Orleans, and the main body 
passed up the river to Springfield Landing, where orders 



SIXTEENTH REGIMENT. 633 

■sy:ere received for Colonel Pike to report with. Ms com- 
mand, at the headquarters of General Banks, and the 
Sixteenth was assigned to guard duty over the arsenal 
of the besieging army. This disposition of the regi- 
ment had been determined on previous to its arrival, on 
account of telegraphic reports from General Emery, 
commanding defenses of New Orleans, to General 
Banks, that there were " only a few skeletons of the 
Sixteenth New Hampshire left." When the regiment 
took possession of Butte a la Eose it numbered near six 
hundred guns ; when they reached the headquarters of 
General Banks beforje Port Hudson, they could muster 
but two hundred and sixteen. 

At Springfield Landing, which was the depot of sup- 
plies for the whole army, a detachment from the Six- 
teenth encountered a sudden attack of the enemy's 
cavalry, which, if successful, would have put the entire 
force investing Port Hudson on "short commons." 
While before Port Hudson, the regiment was, for 
weeks, in line from three o'clock in the morning till 
daylight, in the expectation of an attack by outlying 
parties of the enemy upon that part of the Une of 
investment. 

On the 8th of July Port Hudson surrendered, and on 
the 10th the Sixteenth was among the last of the forces 
to enter the works. Here were almost daily buriSils of 
the dead of the regiment, until the Ist of August, when 
it embarked for home, by way of Cairo. At Vicksburg, 
General Grant, on the personal solicitation of Colonel 
Pike, ordered his post surgeon to examine the sick of 
his regiment, with a view to transfer to the fine fioating 
hospital there of all who were unable to bear the journey 
home, and scores were left, many to be buried by 
stranger hands. At Cairo similar scenes transpired, and 
many were left at other places on the route, several of 
whom never reached home. The regiment reached 



534 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

Concord on the 14th, and was finally paid and discharg- 
ed on the 20th. Though this regiment saw but little 
hard fighting, it suffered as much from disease, induced 
by exposure and the malaria of southern swamps, as any 
from 'Eew Hampshire had done from all causes combined, 
in the same length of time. 



SEVENTEENTH BEOIMENT. 535 



SEVENTEENTH REQIMENT. 



As has been stated in connection with the Fifteenth 
Regiment, in the autumn of 1862, a call was received 
by the Governor of the State for nine months' men 
suflB.cient to fill three regiments of infantry ; and it was 
determined to apportion this levy between the three 
congressional -districts — the Fifteenth to correspond to 
the first district; the Sixteenth to correspond to the 
second district, and the Seventeenth regiment to the 
third district. The field officers of the respective 
commands were immediately thereafter commissioned 
and announced accordingly. It was deemed advisable 
to fill the regiments in their numerical order, as fast 
as men were enlisted, without regard to their place 
of residence. Accordingly those w'ho volunteered with 
promptitude in the third district were ordered into the 
Fifteenth and Sixteenth regiments, leaving for the 
Seventeenth the dilatory levies from all the districts. 
On the 19th of ^November the regiment was ordered into 
camp at Concord. The field and staff officers were : 
Colonel Henry O. Kent, of Lancaster ; Lient. Colonel, 
Charles H. Long, of Claremont; Major, George H. 
Bellows, of "Walpole; Adjutant, George A. "Wainwright, 
of Hanover; Quartermaster, Edward IS". Cummings; 
Surgeon, James D. Folsom ; Assistant Surgeons, Luther 
C. Bean, Horatio IS. Small ; Chaplain, George S. Barnes, 
Sergeant Major, J. "W. Perkins; Quartermaster Ser- 
geant, John C. jenness, of Lancaster, Commissary Ser- 
geant, John P. Dennison, of Lancaster ; Hospital Stew- 
ard, Albra L. Robinson. 

Nearly a full company, above the req^uired quota of 



536 THE QBE AT BEBELLIOS. 

the town, had volunteered for this re^ment in Lancas- 
ter, the residence of the Colonel ; and the records of the 
Adjutant General's office show that there were enlisted 
and mustered into the Seventeenth, and enlisted in the 
territory originally assigned it, seven hundred and 
ninety-one men. The unfilled quotas of the third district, 
at the time of the consolidation of the Seventeenth and 
Second, with this number, seven hundred and ninety- 
one, more than reaching the minimum number of men 
required by the regulations for a complete regimental 
organization. 

The regimental organization was perfected, and the 
drill, discipline and instruction of the command com- 
menced, and was scrupulously adhered to. In December 
it was decided to postpone the State draft, and orders were 
issued to reject all substitutes applying for enlistment 
on the unfilled quotas. Very few volunteers appeared, 
and on the 9th of February, 1863, officers and men of 
the Seventeenth Regiment were furloughed until the Ist 
of the succeeding April, at which time the command 
again reported in camp, cheered by the official assurance 
that the regiment would be at once filled, in order to 
participate in the spring and summer campaign of 1863. 

About this time orders were received by Governor 
Berry, from the Secretary of "War, to consolid,ate the 
Seventeenth and Second Regiments, under such regula- 
tions as he might prescribe. On the 16th of April, 1863^ 
this order was carried into effect, the officers and non- 
commissioned officers of the regiment mustered out, 
and the enlisted men transferred. The order effecting 
this expressed in emphatic terms the approbation of the 
civil and military authorities of the soldierly deportment 
of the regiment from -the time of its organization, and 
the excellent discipline and deportment that had uni- 
formly characterized the command, was remarked on 
every hand. The failure to fill and forward the Seven- 



SEVENTEENTH REGIMENT. 537 

teenth Eegiment was in no way attributable to its offi- 
cers, and tbe circumstances which seemed to make the 
consolidation advisable were regretted alike by officers 
and men. The men proved excellent soldiers, and 
behaved so well at Grettysburg as to elicit a special order 
of commendation from the colonel of the regiment at 
the expiration of their term of service. 



538 THE GREAT REBELLION. 



EIGHTEENTH REGIMENT. 



On the 19th of July, 1864, the "War Department 
issued an order calling for five hundred thousand volun- 
teers, and under this call the States authorities com- 
menced recruiting the Eighteenth Regiment. Charles 
H. Bell, of Exeter, was commissioned Colonel, and 
James "W. Carr, of Manchester, Lieut. Colonel, both of 
whom resigned before being mustered into the United 
States service, and their places were filled by the 
appointment of Thomas L. Livermore, of Milford, and 
Joseph M. Clough, of New London. 

The quota of the State having been filled at the organi- 
zation of the sixth company, no further companies were 
raised until the next call for troops, which was made on 
the 21st of December. The remaining companies were 
now commenced, and on the 17th of January, 1865, 
Major Thomas L. Livermore, of the Fifth, who was at 
the time serving on the staff of Major General Hum- 
phries, as assistant inspector general of the Second 
Corps, was commissioned Colonel. During the months 
of February, March and April, three of the new com- 
panies joined the regiment. Company K, however, was 
stationed on duty at Galloupe's Island, in Boston har- 
bor, and was never ordered to the front, but was mus- 
tered out at that place, on the 6th of May, by order of 
the "War Department. As soon as the tenth company 
had been mustered into service. Colonel Livermore was 
also mustered, and joined his regiment on the 8th of 
April. The following is the list of field, staff and com- 
pany officers of this regiment, and the official record of 
each: 



EIGHTEENTH REGIMENT. 639 



FIELD AND STAFF OFFICERS. 

Colonel — Thomas L. Livermore, of Milford. 

Appointed Colonel 0. S, V., by breyet, while Major 5th JT. H. V., for 
highly valuable and meritorious services, to date from April 7. 1865. Muster. 
ed out as Colonel, June 28, 1865. 

Lieut. Colonel — Joseph M. Clough, of New London. 

Mustered out July 29, 1865. 

Majors — William L Brown, of Fisherville. 

Killed at Fort Steadman, Va., March 29, 1865. 

Alvah K Potter, of Concord. 

Mustered out June 23, 1865. 

Adjutants— George F. Hobbs, of Wakefield. 

Discharged for disability March 18, 1865. 

Samuel S. Caswell, of Strafford. 

Mustered out July 29, 1865. 

Quartermaster — ^Moses T. Cate, of Wolfeborough. 

Mustered out June 10, 18ij5. 

Surgeons — Samuel G. Dearborn. 

Declined March 14, 1866. 

John S. Emerson. 

Mustered out July 29, 1865. 

Ass't Surgeons — A. W. Shepherd. 

Mustered out July 29, 1865. 

Thomas R. Clement. 

Declined March 28, 1865. 

Chaplain — Anthony C. Hardy, of Croydon. 

Mustered out July 29, 1865. 

Sergeant Majors — ^Willis G. C. Kimball, of Concord. 

Promoted to Captain Jan. 24, 1865. 

Leonard H. Wheeler, of Sutton. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865, 

Quartermaster Sergeant — Sam'l N. Brown, of Concord. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 

Commissary Sergeant — ^Henry L. Harris, of Concord. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 

Hospital Steward — Frank H. Newman, of Hillsborough. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865, 

Principal Musicians — ^Nathan W. Gove, of Concord. 

Mustered out June 10, 1 8C5. 

William S. Mudgett, of Weare. 

Mustered oat June 10, 1866. 



540 THE QBE AT REBEILLION. 



COMPANY OFtlCEKS. 

Co. A — Captains — ^Alvah K. Potter, of Concord, 

Fromoted to Major April 4, 1865. 

Augustus. B. Farmer, of Warner. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — ^Augustus B. Farmer, of "Warner. 

Promoted to Captain April' 4, 1865. 

Hiram K. Ladd, of Haverhill. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — ^Hiram K. Ladd, of Haverhill. 

Promoted to First Lieut. April 4, 1865. 

Joseph H. Cram, of Deerfield. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 

Co. B. — Captain — ^Elias F. Smith, of Lebanon. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 

First Lieut. — ^Reuben B. Porter, of Sutton. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 
Second Lieut. — Charles L. Porter, of Lyme. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 

Co. C. — Captain — John O. Wallingford, of Dover. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 

First Lieut. — Samuel S. Caswell, of Strafford. 

Promoted to Adjutant May 19, 1865. 

Second Lieut. — Wilson Gray, of Strafford. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 

Co. D. — Captain — William S. Greenough, of Chester. 

Mustered out June 10, 1866. 
First Lieut. — ^William A. Haven, of Portsmouth. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 

Second Lieut. — John Underhill, of Chester. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 

Co. E.— Captain— William A. Gild, of Franklin. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 
First Lieut. — ^David C. Harriman, of Warner. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — George H. Thom, of Conway. 

Resigned March 18, 1865. 

George S. Whitney, of Thornton. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 

Co. F — Captain — G. W. Bosworth, of Lyndeborough. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 



EIGHTEENTH REGIMENT. 541 

First Lieuts. — Samuel H. Dow, of Campton. 

Hpnorably disoharged March 13, 1866. 
Oliver A. Gibbs, of Dover. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 
Second Lieuts. — Oliver A. Oibbs, of Dover. 

Promoted to First Lieut April 12, 1865. 

Henry P. Gage, of Orford. 

Mustered out June 10, 1865. 
Co. G.— Captain— Willis G. C. Kimball, of Concord. 

Mustered oat July 29, 1865. 
First Lieut. — Clarion H. Kimball, of Hopkinton. 

Mustered out July 29. 1865. 

Second Lieut. — ^TboB. F. Dodge, of Londonderry, 

Mustered out July 29, 1865. 

Co. H. Captain — Silas F. Leonard, of Chester. 

Mustered out July 29, 1866. 
First Lieuts. — ^W. Perkins, of Londonderry. 

Mustered out July 29, 1866. 

Second Lieut. — ^Robert K. Flanders, of Concord. 

Mustered out July 29, 1865. 

Co. L — Captain — ^Benj. B. Thompson, of Wolfeborough. 

Mustered out July 29, 1865. 

First Lieut.— Fred L. Dodge, of Portsmouth. 

Mustered out July 29, 1865. 

Second Lieut. — ^E. K. White, of Manchester. 

Honorably discharged July 3, 1865. 

Co. Bl — Captain — John A. Colby, of Concord. 

Mustered out May 6, 1865. 

First Lieut. — ^Henry S. Brown, of Concord. 

Muftered out May 6, 1865. 

Second Lieut. — ^Edward Fettleton, of IsTewport. 

Mustered out May 6, 1866. 

The six first companies of the Eighteenth Regiment 
went to City Point, and were assigned to General Ben- 
ham's engineer brigade. For several weeks they were 
employed on the impregnable fortifications which sur- 
rounded General Grant's base of supplies, and on a 
corduroy road built to connect City Point with the 
Army of the James. On the 10th of December the 
brigade moved to the front near Petersburg, but return- 
ed to its old quarters on the 13th. On the 18th this 



542 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

re^ment, with enough from others to make the number 
up to twelve hundred men, was organized as a provis- 
ional brigade, under the command of Lieut. Colonel 
Clough, who reported, in pursuance of orders, to 
General Ferrero, commanding defenses of Bermuda 
Hundred, where in the capacity' of engineers they la- 
bored nearly twd weeksj strengthening the fortifications 
in the immediate proximity of the enemy. At the 
expiration of this time the detail returned to City Point. 

On the 19th of March the Eighteenth was detached 
from the engineer brigade and reported to Major Gen- 
eral Parke, commanding the Mnth Corps. On the 26th 
the enemy made his celebrated assault on Fort Stead- 
man, which resulted in its capture. The Eighteenth 
was engaged in the re-capture of the fort, and was then 
assigned to the first division of the corps, commanded 
by General "Wilcox, and by him assigned to the third 
brigade, and placed in Fort Steadman, a position, which, 
owing to its proximity to the rebel lines, was both 
important and dangerous. A constant fire was kept up 
by the pickets on both sides, and artillery duels were of 
frequent occurrence. 

On the night of the 29th the enemy again attacked 
the fort, and a short engagement followed, with a 
heavy fire of both musketry and artillery on both sides. 
The rebels were, however, quickly repulsed by the 
Eighteenth. Major Brown, who was much respected 
and loved, was killed in the action. Lieut. Colonel 
Clough was slightly wounded; several enlisted men 
were killed and wounded, though the casualties were 
rendered light by the protection of the works. 

On the morning of the 2d of April, the Ninth Corps, 
holding the works directly in front of Petersburg, Gen- 
eral "Wilcox's division was ordered to assault the works, 
and while the proper disposition of the troops was being 
made. Captain, W. S. Greenough and several men of 



EiaSTEENTH REGIMENT. 

the Eighteenth were severely wounded. The order for 
attack was countermanded! In a skirmish in the after- 
noon the regiment lost one man killed, three danger- 
Qusly arid several slightly wounded. On the 3d, the 
Eighteenth, with its division, entered the city of Peters- 
burg. On the 5th the Ninth Corps moved to the South 
Side Railroad. The first division remained near Ford's 
Station until the 20th. While here Colonel Livermore 
joined the regiment and assumed command. The regi- 
ment was ordered to Alexandria, where it arrived on 
the 26th, and thence marched through "Washington and 
went into camp on Georgetown Heights. It was on 
guard duty in "Washington during the trial of the assas- 
sins of President Lincoln. 

On the 10th of June the original six companies which 
had been first mustered into service, were mustered out, 
and arrived in Concord on the 13th, where they were at 
once discharged. Company K had already been dis- 
charged at Galloupe's Island. The remaining three 
companies were put on provost guard duty in George- 
town, under command of Major Potter, Colonel Liver- 
more and Lieut. Colonel Clough having been detailed 
on a general court-marshal. On the 15th Colonel Liver- 
more was assigned to the command of the third brigade 
of the division, and on the 23d both he and Major 
Potter were mustered out of service, leaving the rem- 
nant of the regiment in command of Lieut. Colonel 
Clough. On the 29lh of July these too were mustered 
out of service, and arrived in Concord on the 2d of 
August, receiving final discharge and pay on the 8th. 

By order of the "War Department, the names of the 
following engagements were placed upon the colors of 
the regiment: 

Port Steadman, March 25, 1865. 

Attack on Petersburg, April 2, 1865. 

Capture of Petersburg, April 3, 1865. 



544 TSE GREAT REBELLION. 



FIRST NEW HAMPSHIRE CAVALRY. 



The First Eegiment of New Hampshire Cavalry waa 
raised in the spring of 1864. Four companies of the 
regiment were veteran companies of the First Rhode 
Island Cavalry, but raised in New Hampshire in the fall 
of 1861. The Governors of the six New England States 
were authorized by the "War Department to raise a regi- 
ment, to be called the First New England Cavalry, to be 
composed of twelve companies — two from each State. 
All the States except New Hampshire and Rhode Island, 
subsequently raised each a full regiment, while New 
Hampshire raised four, and Rhode Island eight compa- 
nies. These twelve companies were united and formed 
the New England Cavalry. The four New Hampshire 
companies formed a battalion, commanded by Major 
David B. Nelson, of Manchester. It was mustered into 
the United States service at Concord in the fall and 
winter of 1861, where it remained until the 22d of 
December, when it was ordered to Pawtucket, Rhode 
Island, where it joined the other companies of the regi- 
ment, and went into camp. The following were the 
field, staff and company officers of this battalion, with 
the official record of each: 

FXELD AND STAFF OFFICERS. 

Majors — ^David B. Nelson^ of Manchester. 

Besigned June 3, 1862. 

John L. Thompson, of Plymouth, 

Promoted to Colonel 1st N. H. Cavalry, March 17, 1864 

Adjutant — George T. Cram, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Captain Co. <}. Ist N. H. Cavaliy, July 15, 1864. 



FmST CAVALRY. 545 



COMPANY OFFICERS. 

Troop I — Captain — ^David B. Nelson, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Major Dec. 3, 1861. 

John L, Thompson, of Plymouth. 

Promoted to Major July 8, 1862. 

First Lieuts. — John L. Thompson, of Plymouth. 

Promoted to Captom Deo. 8, 1861. 

George T. Cram, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Adjutant Dec. 10, 1861. 

Arnold Wyman, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Captain August 4, 1862. 

Second Lieuts. — George T. Cram, of Manchester. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Dec. 3, 1861. 

Frank Allen, of N'ashua. 

Promoted to First Lieut July 15, 1862. 

Troop K. — Captain — Stephen R. Swett, of Andover. 

Resigned Oct. 13, 1862. 

First Lieut. — Lorenzo D. Gove, of Hanover. 

Killed Oct. 18, 1862. 

Second Lieuts. — George A. Sawyer, of Concord. 

Resigned Nov. 11, 1861. 

George H. Thompson, of Concord. 
Promoted to First Lieut. Aug. 4, 1862. Wounded severely March 17, 1863. 

Troop L. — Captain — John J. Prentiss, of Claremont. 

Dismissed Dec. 30, 1863. 

First Lieut. — ^Augustus H. Bixhy, of Francestown. 

Promoted to Captain July 18, 1862. 

Second Lieut. — ^Wm. P. Prentiss, of Claremont. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Aug. 4, 1862. 

Troop M. — Captain — ^William P. Ainsworth, of Nashua. 

Killed at Front Royal, Va., May 30, 1862. 

First Lieut. — Joseph F. Andrews, of Nashua. 

Promoted to Quartermaster, Jan. 1, 1862. 

Second Lieut. — John L. Perley, Jr., of Laconia. 
IKed of disease at Catlet's Station, Va., June 9, 1862. 

On the 14th of March, 1862, the regiment was ordered 
to Washington, where it joined the Army of the Poto- 
mac. While at Washington the name of the regiment 
was changed from the First New England Cavalry to 
the First Ehode Island Cavalry, thus, so far as the name 
might indicate, cutting the four New Hampshire com- 



546 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

panics off from all identity with their State. This was 
a severe hlow to the men from which they never fully 
recovered while they remained with that organization. 
As a consequence of this change of name the Governor 
of N'ew Hampshire refused to send the battalion recruits 
when needed to fill its ranks. 

In May the New Hampshire battalion was ordered to 
Fredericksburg to report to General Shields, thus sepa- 
rating them from the Ehode Island portion of the regi- 
ment. ' This was highly satisfactory to the N^ew Hamp- ' 
shire men. On the 30th of May, in a charge upon the 
retreating column of the enemy, who were burning 
bridges after them, the battalion showed great dash and 
courage. The enemy's cavalry, which attempted to act 
as a rear guard, ingloriously rode down their own infan- 
try and escaped. Coming upon the enemy's infantry 
some were sabered, but most surrendered as soon 
as they were reached. The enemy made a stand at a 
narrow gorge, with a brook running through it, the 
bridge over which could only be crossed by file, and so 
posted themselves that they had complete range of the 
brook. Captain Ainsworth and about a dozen men boldly 
dashed down the hill to cross the bridge. They were 
all either killed or seriously wounded. Captain Ains- 
worth and seven men were killed, and ten were more or 
less seriously wounded. There were captured from the 
enemy more than one hundred and fifty officers and 
men, besides baggage wagons, horses, stores, and imple- 
ments of war of all kinds in great numbers. Only the 
cavalry and a small remnant of a regiment of infantry 
escaped. This was the battalion's first engagement, and 
was such a victory as surprised even those who had 
accomplished it. Immediately after the action at Front 
Royal Major Nelson resigned, and the command devolv- 
ed on Captain Thompson. The battalion was rejoined 
by the rest of the regiment on the first of June. 



FIRST CAVALRY. 647 

The regiment was at Bull Run on the 29th of August, 
and took part in the second battle there on the 30th. 
When the retreat commenced it took the rear and saved 
the army. The regiment participated in the battle of 
Chantilly, on the 1st of September, and had almost 
daily skirmishes with the enemy all through General 
Pope's campaign. A picket post, stationed at Mount- 
ville, five miles from any support, composed of part of 
Companies I and M, under command of Captain Gove, 
was attacked October 31, by a whole brigade of cavalry 
tinder General Stuart, and a large number killed and 
captured. Captain Gove and several men were killed, 
and Lieut. Andrews and about twenty-five men were 
captured.' 

When general Hooker assumed command of the 
army, the cavalry was organized in one corps, under 
command of General Stoneman. The battle of Kelley's 
Tord was perhaps the first real cavalry battle of the war. 
The enemy charged that part of the line where the First 
Rhode Island Cavalry was posted. The charge was 
brilliantly executed, but promptly met and repulsed. 
There -was a short but severe conflict, and the enemy 
retreated, leaving many prisoners in the hands of the 
Union troops. The regiment took part in the celebrated 
Stoneman raid, and with that exception remained in 
camp near Falmouth until the 25th of March, 1863. 

Tn June the regiment, numbering but about three 
hundred men — ^the l^ew Hampshire battalion about one 
hundred — while in camp in a grove near Middleburg, on 
the road from Fairfax Court House to the Blue Ridge, 
was surrounded by a strong force of the enemy. They 
must surrender or fight, and they determined upon the 
latter. They .charged through the enemy's line, but many 
were killed and captured. That night there were not 
fifty men together belonging to the First Rhode Island 
Cavalry, except in the hands of the enemy. Subse- 



548 THE QBE AT REBELLION. 

quently a few men found their way to headquarters, but 
New Hampshire was represented by less than thirty 
men. General Duffie, who had been in command of the 
regiment about a year, was promoted to Brigadier Gen- 
eral, and was succeeded by Lieut. Colonel Thompson. 
The sick and those who were on detached service re- 
turned, and in July the regiment numbered about two 
hundred and fifty effective men. During the autumn 
it was engaged in the battles of Auburn and Bristoe 
Station, and in all the operations of the Army of th^ 
Potomac. 

riKST NEW HAMPSHIRE CAVALRY. 

In January, 1864, the New Hampshire battalion was 
detached from the regiment, with a view to forming a 
new regiment exclusively of New Hampshire men. 
Nearly all the men re-enlisted, and in February left the 
army for home on their veteran furlough, and to form 
the First New Hampshire Cavalry. Before the close of 
April the four old companies had been filled to the max- 
imum, and three new ones had been completed and 
mustered into service, and proceeded to "Washington, 
where they arrived on the 25th. The regiment was not 
completed until July, when the five remaiifing compa- 
nies were sent to Washington. The regimental organi- 
zation was as follows: 

Colonel — John L. Thompson, of Plymouth. 

Appointed Brigadier Oeneral U. S. Vola. by brevet, for distingniahed and 
meritorioos serrices, to date from March 13, 1866. Mustered out as Ciolone^ 
July 16, 1866. 

Lieut. Colonel — ^Benjamin T. Hutchins, of Concord.* 
M^or^-^Arnold Wyman, of Manchester. 

Joseph F. Arnold, of Nashua. 

John A. Cummings, of Peterborough. 
Quartermaster — George W. Towle, of Hooksett. 

I * Uiil«M cthsrwiae stated the record la— "Mastered oat Joly 16, 1866." 



FIBST CA VALR T. 649 

Commissary — ^William H. Moiilton, of Andover. 
Surgeon — George W. Pierce, of Winchester. 
Assistant Surgeons — George AV". Pierce, of Winchester. 

Wounded in five places and captured 'Not. 12, 1864. Bileased Jan. 14, 1865. 
Promoted to Surgeon Feb. 17, 1866. 

Frederick A. Eldridge, of Milford. 

Sergeant Major — ^Walter Perley, of Concord. 

Quartermaster Sergeant — M. B. Clough, of Deering. 

Commissary Sergeant — John C. Caryl, of Brookfield. 

Hospital Steward— Daniel S. Mooney, of New Hampton. 

Mustered out May 29, 1866. 

Veterinary Surgeon — Charles B. Prentiss, of Concord. 

COMPANY OFFICERS. 

Troop A. — Captain — ^Edwin Vaughan, of Claremont. 

Honorably discharged May 16, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — George W. Estabrook, of Concord. 

Wounded severely Sept 29, 1864. Mustered out Jan. 4, 1865. 
John Steele, of Goffstown. 
Second Lieut. — Geo^ W. Morrison, of Haverhill. 

Missing near Lacy Springs, Va., Dec. 21, 1864. Ghiined from missing. 
Mustered out July 15, 1865. 

Troop B. — Captain — Otis C. Wyatt, of Sanbornton. 

First Lieut. — ^Edward P. Abbott, of Manchester. 
Wounded June 23, 1864. Absent on detached service at Elmira, N. T., 
July 15, 1865. No discharge furnished. 

Second Lieuts. — John Steele, of GoiFstown. 

Promoted to First Lieut Feb. 23, 1865. 

John S. Cilley, of Andover. 
Troop C.-^Captain — ^Pierce L. Wiggin, of Ossipee. 

First Lieut. — ^William H. Palmer, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Captain Feb. 23, 1865. 

Second Lieut. — John P. Thompson, of Andover. 
Troop D. — Captain — ^Ezra B. Parker, of Littleton. 

Absent on detached service at Annapolis, Md., Jijy 15, 1865. No discharge 
famished. 

First Lieut.— Fred P. Stone, of Webster. 
Second Lieut. — Chas. H. Kelley, of Farmington. 

Resigned Jan. 19, 1865. 

Troop E. — Captain — ^Benjamin F. Rackley, of Dover. 
First Lieut. — Charles E. Patrick, of Claremont. 



550 THE GBEAT REBELLION. 

Second Lieut. — ^W. Tuttle, of Newmarket, 
Troop F. — Captain — ^Nathaniel H. Brown, of Derry. 

First Lieut. — George H. Smith, of Farmington. 
Second Lieut. — ^Horatio Mclntire, of Keene. 

Dismissed Feb. 16, 1866 

Troop G. — Captain — George T. Cram, of Meredith. 

First Lieut. — George E. Gihnan, of Meredith. 

Discharged. 

Second Lieut. — Oscar J. Converse, of Rindge, 

Troop H. — Charles E. Patrick, of Claremont. 

Not mustered. Mustered out as First Lieut. July 15, 1866. 

First Lieut. — ^Frank P. Cram, of Hampton Falls. 

Second Lieut. — George H. Pressey, of Sutton. 

Honorably discharged March 17, 1866. 

Troop L — Captains — A. H. Bixby, of Francestown. 

Commissioned by the Governor of Rhode Island. Honorably discharged on 
account of wounds Nov. 9, 1864. 

George H. Thompson, of Concord. 

Not mustered. Promoted to Major 6th U. S. Vols., March 27, 1866. 

William H. Palmer, of Manchester, 
First Lieuts — William H. Moulton, of Andover. 

Promoted to Commissary Jan. 26, 1866. 

Thomas C. Edwards, of Keene. 

Second Lieut. — Thomas C. Edwards, of Keene. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Feb. 23, 1866. 

Troop K. — Captains — Wm. P. Prentiss, of Claremont. 

Mustered out Jan. 18, 1866. 

George A. Eobbins, of Hillsborough. 
First Lieuts. — George H. Thompson, of Concord. 

Commissioned by the Governor - of Rhode Island. Promoted to Captain 
Dec. 17, 1864. 

Frank P. Flynn, of Lebanon. 

Second Lieut. — ^Frank P. Flynn, of Lebanon, 

Promoted to First lieut Feb. 28, 1866. 

Troop L. — ^First Lieuts. — G. A. Robbins, of Hillsborough, 

Mustered out Dec. 17, 1864. 

Philip Jones, of Somersworth. 

Second Lieut. — Robert Campbell, of Sutton. 

CiUed at White Oak Swamp, Ya., June 13, 1864. 

Troop M. — Captains — George H. Rhodes. 

Commissioned by the Governor of ^ode Island. Discharged for disability 
Nov. 10. 1864. 



FIRST CA VALE Y. 551 

Henry B. Haley, of l^ewmarket. 

Honorably discharged March 30, 1865. 

First Lieut. — Robert P. Shapley, of Rye. 

Died of disease at Darnstown, Md., June 2, 1865. 

Second Lieut. — Henry B. Haley, of Newmarket. 

Promoted to Captain Jan. 16, 1865. 

The First New Hampshire Cavalry was attached to 
the third division of the cavalry corps, General "Wil- 
son commanding. In an engagement near "White Oak 
Swarm, on the 13th of June, 1864, Lieut. Campbell and 
several men were killed, and many wounded. For the 
conduct of the regiment on this occasion, and in cover- 
ing the movement of the army across the James, it was 
highly commended by the lieutenant general command- 
ing. 

WILSON'S EAID. 

On the morning of the 21st of June, at an early hour, 
the cavalry were ordered to prepare for a long march. 
The regiment with its division was joined at Jerusalem 
Plank Road by General Kautz's cavalry command from 
the Army of the James, the whole under command of 
General "Wilson ; a force of nine thousand sabers, twelve 
guns, and six mounted howitzers. The command cross- 
ed the "Weldon Railroad at Ream's Station, destroyed 
the track for several miles, and then moved rapidly to 
the South Side Railroad, where they burned bridges and 
destroyed several miles of track. Near Nottaway Court 
House they were attacked by a cavalry division of the 
enemy under Fitz Hugh Lee, and after a severe fight, 
killing and wounding more than one hundred and fifty 
of the enemy, they retreated in confusion. At Stony 
Creek Station, on the "Weldon Railroad, they met a 
largely superior force of the enemy, consisting of infan- 
try cavalry and artillery, which had been detached from 
Lee's army for the purpose of intercepting them. 



552 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

"Wilson's command retired to Eeam's Station, where the 
enemy was met in still larger force, and it became evi- 
dent that the design was to capture the whole party, 
which had destroyed their railroad. So perilous had 
the position of the command become that General 
Wilson determined to abandon his wounded, destroy his 
caissons, limbers, and ammunition wagons, and attempt 
to cut his way through. After a desperate fight a por- 
tion of the command escaped, but the enemy captured 
all the artillery and compelled the retreat of the remain- 
der of the cavalry. Arriving at City Point, orders were 
issued to dismount all the cavalry regiments recruited 
since a certain date, which included this regiment, and 
convert them into infantry; but on the representation by 
General "Wilson of its good discipline and effectiveness, 
the First New Hampshire was excepted. This famous 
raid was seldom equalled during the war, either in its 
hardships or results. Eighty miles of railroad track, 
four locomotives, two trains of cars, large quantities of 
tobacco and cotton were destroyed, twenty-five hundred 
contrabands and a great number of horses and mules 
brought into the TJnion lines, and the communication of 
Lee's army with the south completely cut off for a 
month. In this raid the regiment suffered a loss of one 
oflScer and seventy men, killed, wounded or missing. 

All through the summer and fall of 1864 the N'ew 
Hampshire Cavalry was continually active in co-oper- 
ating with the Army of the Potomac, with its division, 
by itself and by detachments, on raids, skirmishing and 
performing long, hasty, and tedious marches to points 
where its services were required — gaining for itself a 
high reputation for discipline and efficiency, and reflect- 
ing honor upon the State. 

The army lay at "Winchester, in winter quarters, until 
the last of February, 1865, little of importance occur- 
ring. On the 18th of December, in an expedition up 



FIRST CAVALRY. 653 

the valley, the division was attacked at night, and in 
the confusion Lieut. Colonel Hutchins and several others 
were captured. Later in the winter fifty picked men, 
under Lieuts. Palmer and Jones, took part in the raid 
which resulted in the capture of Harry Gilmor, the 
noted guerrilla. 

On the 26th of February General Sheridan, with the 
two divisions of Cavalry commanijed respectively by 
Generals Custar and Merritt, started on the raid on 
which he reached Richmond, after capturing the rem- 
nants of Early's army, and destroying railroads and the 
James River canal. The Twenty-second ITew York 
was joined with the First l^ew Hampshire, under com- 
mand of Colonel Thompson, both regiments being 
reduced in numbers,, and acting as a single regiment. 
On the fourth day the command reached Waynes- 
borough, a small village about twelve miles south of 
Staunton, on the railroad leading to Gordonsville. The 
enemy was found strongly posted on the ridge at the 
entrance to the village, in rifle-pits, and having many 
guns in position in earthworks. Two regiments were 
dismounted and sent to make a demonstration on the 
eiiemy's left, while the First New Hampshire and two 
others were kept in front, mounted for a charge. At 
the signal for the charge Colonel Thompson's command 
took the front, followed by the Eighth New York and 
First Vermont. The men rode up to the rifle-pits, leap- 
ed their horses over the works, and with their sabers 
alone captured about fifteen hundred prisoners, all the 
artillery, wagons, other properly, and the colors of 
every regiment and detachment engaged. The rebel 
army was entirely demolished. The prisoners were 
taken to Winchester by Colonel Thompson, with a 
guard of seven small regiments, including the First 
New Hampshire Cavalry, nnmbfering about six hundred, 
and a few dismounted men. This was a responsible 



654 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

duty, his rear being continually threatened and several 
times attacked by the enemy. It was accomplished, 
however, without the loss of a prisoner, but on the con- 
trary having materially increased their number by 
captures. 

The five companies unorganized when the seven first 
ones left the State, were largely composed of substitutes, 
and others who enlisted for the heavy bounties offered, 
many of whom deserted on the way and after reaching 
the regiment. They did not join the regiment until 
March, 1865, but were kept on detached duty. The 
regiment was mustered out of service on the 29th of 
June, arrived at Concord on the 16th of July, and on 
the 21st was paid and discharged. 



LiaST BA TTEB T. 565 



NEW HAMPSHIRE LIGHT BATTERY. 



The first and only light battery sent to the war from 
Kew Hampshire was organized at Manchester in the 
autumn of 1861. It was mustered into the United 
States service on the 26th of September. The following 
were its officers, and their official record : 

Captains — George A. Gerrish, of Manchester. 

Honorably disclukrged March 7, 1868. 

Frederick M. Edgell, of Orford. 
Promoted to Major 1st Begt. N. H. Heavy Artillery Nov. 10, 1864. 

George K. Dakin, of Manchester. 

See 12th Company Heavy Artilleiy. 

First Lieuts. — ^Edwin H. Hobbs, of Manchester. 

Mastered out June 22, 1863. 

Frederick M. Edgell, of Orford. 

Promoted to Captain March 8, 1863. 

John "Wadleigh, of Orford. 

Discharged to accept promotion April 3, 1864. 

"William N". Chamberlain, of Orford. 

Musteredout Oct. 5, 1864. 

Gilman Steams, of Orford. 

Mustered out Oct. 6, 1864. 

George K. Dakin, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Captain Dec. 8, 1864. 

Ephraim Fiske, of Manchester. 

See 12th Company Heavy Artillery. 

Ezra D. Cilley, of Manchester. 

See 12th Company Heavy Artillery. 

Second Lieuts. — John "Wadleigh, of Manchester. 

Promoted to First Lieut March 8, 1868. 

Henry F, Condict, of Manchester. 

Resigned June 2, 1863. 

John R. Piper, of Manchester. 

Mustered out Sept 28, 1864. 

Orrin Taber, of Manchester. 

Mustered out Oct 7, 1864. 



556 THE GREAT BSBELLION. 

Jolin R, Bean, of Manchester. 

See 12th Company Heayy Artillery. 

Asa D. Gilmore, of Concord. 

See 12th Ckimpany Heavy Artillery. 

On the Ist of November this company proceeded to 
"Washington, completely armed and equipped as a six 
gun battery. It was assigned to the first Division of the 
Army of the Potomac, Major General McDowell com- 
manding, and moved to Munson's Hill, Virginia. The 
Battery was with its division in the advance upon 
Manassas, on the 10th of March, 1^62, and occupied the 
City of Fredericksburg on the 18th of April. On the 
9th of August it marched with its division to join Gen- 
eral Pope at Culpeper Court House, and arrived at 
Cedar Mountain on the 11th, two days after the battle 
at that place. On the retreat of General Pope's com- 
mand, the Battery was engaged with the enemy at 
Rappahannock station on the 22d of August, at Sul- 
phur Springs on the 26th, and reached the battle ground 
of Bull Run on the 29th. Toward evening a reconnoi- 
tering force, consisting of the brigade of General Hatch, 
the First iN'ew Hampshire Battery and a few cavalry 
troops was sent down the Warrenton road; met the 
enemy in force near Groveton, and after a short but 
severe engagement was repulsed. The Battery lost in 
this action two men killed; Lieut. Wadleigh and several, 
men severely wounded; Captain Gerrish and ten men 
taken prisoners, and one gun captured by the enemy. 

The Battery was engaged in the action at Antietam 
on the 17th of September, in the corps of General 
Hooker. It commenced the action on the extreme 
right, at daylight, and rendered efficient service in differ- 
ent parts of the field during the entire day. It had 
only a few men wounded and a few horses killed and 
disabled. Captain Gerrieh and Lieut. Wadleigh rejoin- 
ed the Battety on the 5th of November, and it proceeded 



LIGHT BA TTER Y. 557 

to Aqua Creek, Va. It took active part in the battle of 
Fredericksburg, on the 13th of December. It moved 
to its position in the line of battle, which was on the 
extreme left of Eeynolds' Corps of Franklin's Grand 
Division, early in the morning. Here it soon became 
engaged with the batteries of the enemy, and continued 
fighting until dark. It lost three men killed, fifteen 
wounded, and about twenty horses killed and disabled. 
Captain Gerrish, then acting Chief of Artillery of First 
Division, was wounded early in the action and taken 
from the field. A few days later it went into winter 
quarters at Pratt's Landing, on Potomac Creek. 

In March, 1863, Captain Gerrish, being still disabled 
by /his wound, resigned his command. The Battery 
moved with its corps toward the Rappahannock, below 
Fredericksburg, and was there engaged with the enemy 
on the 29th and 30th of April and 2d of May. It was 
afterward engaged at Chancellorsville, on the 4th and 5th 
of May, sustaining small loss. In May it was transferred 
from the First Corps to the Artillery Reserve. The 
Battery with the Reserve Artillery, arrived at Gettys- 
burg early on the morning of the 2d of July, and was 
put in position on Cemetery Hill, which post it main- 
tained until noon on the 4th, doing excellent service, 
especially in assisting to repel the furious assaults of 
the enemy on the 3d. Although exposed for many 
hours to a destructive fire, it had but three men 
wounded, and sustained but a small loss in horses and 
material. 

On the 15th of October the battery was assigned to 
the Third Army Corps, and joined the command at 
Union Mills on the same day. On the 8th of November 
it was engaged in a sharp skirmish with the enemy at 
Brandy Station, and again at Mine Run on the 30th. 
It subsequently went into winter quarters at Brandy 
Station. 



558 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

In the Spring of 1864, the Battery was assigned to 
the Second Army Corps, Major General Hancock com- 
manding, and joined it at Stevensburg, Va., on the 19th 
of April. It was engaged with the enemy at the battle 
of the Wilderness, on the 6th of May, and with the 
Sixth Maine Battery, was posted in one of the few 
places accessible to artillery, and withstood the shock 
of the charging columns of Longstreet's Corps, and 
drove back the enemy with severe loss. It sustained 
no loss except a few horses killed and disabled. It was 
engaged at Po River on the 9th, 10th and 11th, where 
one officer and two men were severely wounded, others 
slightly, and four or five horses killed or disabled. It 
was engaged at Spottsylvania, fighting on the 14th and 
18th of May, without loss. At North Anna River on 
the 23d, it supported the advance of Birney's Division, 
which succeeded in carrying the bridge and in effecting 
a crossing. 

At Cold Harbor the battery fought again on the 3d 
and 5th of June, having two men wounded and two 
horses killed. It arrived at Petersburg on the 16th and 
was immediately placed in position for battle, and during 
this and the succeeding four days was sharply engaged, 
having two men severely wounded. Up to the 30th 
of June, in the campaign of that year, it had marched 
one hundred and fifty miles, and been eighteen days 
engaged in action with the enemy. 

On the 27th of July, at Deep Bottom, the Battery 
engaged a battery of the enemy which was greatly 
annoying the Union troops, and in less ,than thirty min- 
utes the hostile batterj' was completely silenced, its men 
driven from their guns, and one of its limbers exploded. 
The only loss to the New Hampshire Battery was two 
horses Idlled, and a caisson disabled. It again returned 
to the front of Petersburg, arriving there on the morn- 
ing of the 30th, ready to take part in the assault of that 



LIGHT BA TTEB T. 559 

day. From the 20th to the 30th of August it was 
almost every day engaged, during which time it lost one 
man killed and two severely wounded by the enemy's 
sharpshooters. It was now removed to Fort Hill, where 
it remained until the 7th of September, and was then 
placed on the front line of Battery No. 13, where it 
remained until the 22d of October, being almost con- 
stantly engaged. From July 1st to October -22d, the 
Battery had been twenty days engaged wi^h the enemy. 
On the 25th of September, its first term of enlists 
ment having expired, fifty-nine men of the original 
number, who had not re-enlisted, were mustered out of 
service, together with four officers. By an order from 
the War Department, on the 5th of ^November, this 
organization was transferred to the First Regiment of 
^ew Hampshire Heavy Artillery, with the designation 
of Battery M, but guarantied to remain detached as a 
Light Battery in the field. Perhaps no organization 
from this State rendered more faithful and valuable ser- 
vice to the country, or made for itself a more honorable 
record, than the First New Hampshire Battery, in the 
three years of its existence. 



660 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 



FIRST HEAVY ARTILLERY. 



In April, 1863, the War Department granted special 
authority to raise in New Hampshire a company of 
Heavy Artillery, to garrison the defenses of Portsmouth 
harbor, and on the 17th of that month Charles H. Long, 
late Lieut. Colonel of the Seventeenth Eegiment — 
which was not mustered into the United States service — 
was commissioned Captain. The organization was com- 
pleted and the company was mustered into the service 
on the 22d of July, 1863, and stationed at Fort Consti- 
tution. 

On the 18th of August, 1863, Ira McL. Barton, for- 
merly a Captain in the Fifth Regiment^, was commission- 
ed Captain of a second company, raised under similar 
authority and for similar purposes as the first. It was 
mustered into the United States" service on the 17th of 
September, and was stationed at Fort McClary, Kittery 
Point. 

These companies remained at their respective posts 
until May, 1864. During this time the first company 
made many improvements in Fort Constitution, build- 
ing a long set of quarters for the men. The second 
company, stationed at Fort McClary, upon the Quarter- 
master's purchasing the lumber, built, without any 
assistance, one of the finest hospitals belonging to the 
United States on the N'ew England coast. -On the 6th 
of May, both companies, under orders from Major Gen- 
eral Dix reported to General Augur, commanding the 
Department of "Washington, and were assigned for duty 
in the defenses of that city. Company A furnished 
men for garrison duty at Forts Slocum, Stevens, Totten, 



HE A VY AR TILLER Y. 561 

Sumner, and Batteries Parrott, Cameron, Kendall, and 
Vermont. Company B was sent as a relieving and 
occnpying force into ten different forts, among them 
Forts Bunker Hill, Saratoga, Lincoln, Bayard, Gaines, 
and Foote, at whicli last important work they were 
stationed as a permanent garrison. Company A was 
stationed in the defenses north of the city, and assisted 
in defeating Early in his raid on Washington — Captain 
Long being in command of a Provisional Battalion of 
four hundred men. 

In August, 1864, Captain Ira McL. Barton made appli- 
cation to the Secretary of "War, through Governor Joseph 
A. Gilmore, of New Hampshire, for leave to raise a 
battalion of at least four companies of Heavy Artillery, 
which was granted on the 19th of August. Captain 
Barton was placed on recruiting service by the War 
Department, and returning to IN'ew Hampshire, took 
charge of the organization of the companies, under 
Adjutant General ISTatt Head. In the meantime a third 
company had been started, and was quickly raised by 
Captain J. O. Chandler, of Manchester. The four 
additional companies authorized by the War Depart- 
ment were very soon filled. One at Dover, by Captain 
George W. Colbath; one at Concord, by Captain R. S. 
Davis; one at Nashua, by Captain D. J. Flanders, and 
one at Laoonia, by Captain A. S. Libby. Kecruits came 
in so rapidly that the four companies authorized were 
soon more than filled, and Adjutant General Head 
obtained authority to raise other companies. One was 
raised at Newport by Captain C. C. Shattuck, and 
another at Lancaster, by Captain Charles O. Bradley, 
while a third was organized from a ninety days' com- 
pany at Fort Constitution, and a fourth from general 
volunteers at Concord, the former under Captain 
George C. Houghton, and the latter under Captain R. E. 
Welch. 



562 TEE GREAT REBELLION. 

The companies were ordered to "Washington as fast as 
they were organized, and were .assigned to duty under 
the direction of Major General Augur. Ten companies 
having been organized, and the eleventh having been 
commenced, authority was given to complete the regi- 
mental organization. The Governor commissioned 
Captain Long as Colonel, and Captain Barton as Lieut. 
Colonel. Lieut. Colonel Barton was itnmediately mus- 
tered, and wag relieved from duty in New Hampshire 
by Colonel Long, who undertook the completion of the 
regiment. It being found impossible to raise the twelfth 
company, which was necessary to fully complete the 
regimental organization, and to admit of the muster of 
Colonel Long, the ITew Hampshire Light Battery was 
assigned to the Jregiment, and on the 16th of November 
Colonel Long was mijstered and assumed command. 
The following is a list of the field, staff and company 
officers, and the official record of each : 

FIELD AND STAPF OFFICERS. 

Colonel — Charles H. Long, of Clarmont.* 
Lieut. Colonel — L-a McL. Barton, of Newport. 
Majors — George A. "Wainwright, of Hanover. 

Dexter G. Eeed, of Newport. 

Frederick M. Edgell, of Orford. 
Surgeon — ^Ezekiel Morrill, of Concord. 
Ass't Surgeons — R. "W". Price, of Seabrook. 

Amos S. Bixby, of Acworth. 
Chaplain— C. W. "Walker, of Stratford. 
Sergeant Major — ^Norman A. Tuttle, of Keene. 
Quartermaster Sergeant — S. D. Hill, of Manchester. 
Commissary Sergeant — Wm. D. Haley, of Tuftonboro*. 
Hospital Stewards — Sam. Nims, of Newport. 
Principal Musicians — Hiram S. Clifford, of Alexandria. 

John H. Caswell, of Concord. 

*Uiilegs otherwise atated, the record is " Mustered out June 15, 1865." 



HE A VT AR TILLER Y. 563 



COMPANY OFFICERS. 

Co. A. — Captains — Charles H. Long, of Claremont. 

Promoted to Colonel Sept. 29, 1864. 

Benjamin F. Wells, of Lisbon. 

Mustered out Sept. 11, 1866. 

First Lieuts. — Greo. A. Wainwright, of Hanover. 

Promoted to Major, Sept. 29, 1864. 

Benjamin F. Wells, of Lisbon. 

Promoted to Captain Not. 9, 1864. 

Frank G. Wentwortb, of Lee. 

Mustered out Sept. 11, 1865. 

Christopher W. Harold, of Portsmouth. 

Mustered out Sept. 11, 1865. 
Second Lieuts. — Benjamin F. Wells, of Lisbon. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Aug. 10, 1863. 

Christopher W. Harold, of Portsmouth. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Not. 9, 1864. 

Frank G. Wentworth, of Lee. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Sept. 29, 1864. 

Clarence S. Grey, of Portsmouth. 

Mustered out Sept. 11, 1865. 

Walter S. Bailey, of Lancaster. 

Mustered out Sept. 11,. 1865. 

Co. B. — Captains — Ira McL. Barton, of Newport. 

Promoted to Lieut. Colonel Sept. 29, 1864. 

George P. Thyng, of Gilford. 

Mustered out Sept. 11, 1865. 

First Lieuts. — ^Dexter G. Reed, of Newport. 

Promoted to Major Sept. 29, 1864. 

Samuel Webster, of Dover. 

Died Feb. 3, 1864. 
George P. Thyng, of Gilford. 

Promoted to Captain Sept. 29, 1864. 

Lucius H. Buswell, of Grantham. 

Mustered out Sept. 11, 1865. 
Haskell P. Coffin, of Londonderry. 

Mustered out Sept. 11, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — Thos. J. Whittle, of Manchester. 

Honorably discharged June 11, 1864. 

George P. Thyng, of Gilford. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Feb. 4, 1864. 

Lucius A. Buswell, of Grantham. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Sept. 29, 1864. 



564 TEE OREAT REBELLION. , 

Alexander V. Hitchcock, of S"ewport. 

Honorably discharged July 29, 1864. 

Haskell P. Coffin, of Londonderry. 

Promoted to First Lieut Sept. 29, 1864. 

Joseph Mills, of Great Falls. 

Honorably discharged June 8, 1865. 

Albert Miner, of Croydon. 

Mustered out Sept. 11, 1865. 

Co. C. — Captain — James 0. Chandler, of Manchester. 

First Lieuts. — James E. Carr, of Manchester. 

James G. Burns, of Manchester. 

Second Lieuts. — James G. Burns, of Manchester. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Sept. 8, 1864. 

Moses O. Pearson, of Manchester. 

Eeuben Dodge, of Manchester. 

Co. D. — Captain — George W. Colbath, of Dover. 

First Lieuts. — Wm. S. Pillsbury, of Londonderry. 

"William F. Thiayer, of Dover. 

Second Lieuts. — William F, Thayer, of Dover. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Sept. 12, 1864. 

Joseph T. S. Libby, of Dover. 

Moses P. Moulton, of Dover. 

Honorably discharged Feb. 15, 1865. 

Joseph H. Flagg, of Kingston. 
Co. E. — Captain — Robert S. Davis, of Concord. 

First Lieuts. — Joseph C. Clifford, of Salisbury. 

Plumer D. Watson, of ITorthwood. 
Second Lieuts. — Joseph L Shallis, of Concord. 
Melvin L. Ingalls, of Concord. 
Co. F. — Captain — Daniel J. Flanders, of Nashua. 
First Lieuts. — Major A. Shaw, of Nashua. 

Henry M. Mills, of Nashua. 
Second Lieuts. — Milton A. Taylor, of Nashua. 
George H. Sears, of Nashua. 
Co. G. — Captain — Alvah S. Libby, of Wolfeborough. 
First Lieuts. — James H. Swan, of Laconia. 
Levi F. Whitney, of Gilford. 

Discharged for disability Jan. 20, 1865. 

William W. Ballard, of Holderness. 



EEA VT ABTILLEB T. 565 

Second Lieuts.— Wm. W. Ballard, of Holderness. 

Promoted to First Lieut Feb. 23, 1865. 

George W. Home, of Wolfeborough. 

Henry F. Hunt, of Gilford. 

Co. H. — Captain — Charles C. Shattuck, of Newport. 

First Lieuts. — Clark Edwards, of Landaff. 

Truman L. Heath, of Newport. 

Second Lieuts. — ^P. H. "Welcome, of Newport. 

Albert S. Holland, of Keene. 

Co. I. — Captains — Charles 0. Bradley, of Concord. 

First Lieuts. — John C. Jenness, of Lancaster. 

William H. Shurtleff, of Lancaster. 

Second Lieuts — Clark Stevens, of Columbia. 

Chauncey H. Greene, of Littleton. 

Co. K. — Captain — George C. Houghton, of Manchester. 

First Lieuts. — Charles L. Bailey, of Manchester. 

John E. Johnson, of Manchester. 

Promoted to Captain and A. Q. M. U. S. V., May 11, 1866. 

Second Lieut. — H. A. Lawrence, of Manchester. 
Edward J. Wing, of Manchester. 
Co. L. — Captain — ^Richard E. Welch, of Concord. 

First Lieuts. — Stephen E. Twombly, of Milton. 

Paine Durkee, of Croydon. 
Second Lieuts. — Wm. C. Mahurin, of Columbia. 
George E. Crummett, of Concord. 
Co. M. — ^LiGHi^ Battery. 

Captain — George K. Dakin, of Manchester. 
First Lieuts. — ^Ephraim Fisk, of Manchester 

Ezra D. Cilley. 
Second Lieuts. — John R. Bean. 

Asa D. Gilmore, of Concord. 
All the offioers of this Battery were Mustered out June 9, 1866. 

On the 21st of November, 1864, Colonel Long was 
assigned to the command of Hardin's division. Twenty- 
second Army Corps, and the command of the regiment 
devolved upon Lieut. Colonel Barton. On the 25th 



566 , THE aBEAT REBELLION. 

Battery A was ordered to Portsmouth harbor, and in 
February, 1865, Battery B was ordered for duty at the 
same place. During the winter and until the muster 
out of the regiment, it garrisoned a line of works ten 
miles in extent, and gained considerable proficiency in 
artillery drill. 

On the 15th of June, 1865, the regiment was muster- 
ed out of service, and arrived at Concord on the 19th, 
where it received final pay and discharge. 




THE SHAEPSHOOTER. 



SHARPSHOOTERS. 567 

SHARPSHOOTERS. 



New Hampshire furnished three companies of Sharp- 
shooters for the army. In the summer of }861, Colonel 
Berdan procured permission from the War Department 
to raise a force of Sharpshooters, and a promise that 
two thousand Sharpe's rifles should be manufactured 
for them. The result was the First and Second Regi- 
ments of United States Sharpshooters, commonly known 
as Berdan's Sharpshooters, of which the three compa- 
nies from this State formed a part. Colonel Berdan 
asked the Governor first for one, and then for two more 
companies. The test prescribed by the "War Depart- 
ment for Sharpshooters was: each man must make a 
string of ten shots, measuring, in the aggregate, from 
center of bull's eye to center of ball, not more than 
fifty inches, at a distance jDf one hundred yards off-hand, 
or two hundred yards at a rest. This was the maximum, 
but the strings of the men admitted into the first com- 
pany varied from seven to thirty inches. It was 
mustered into the United States service on the 9tji of 
September, 1861, and left the State |f6r Weehawken, 
New Jersey, the rendezvous of the j^rst regiment, on the 
11th, and was assigned to the first regiment as Company 
E. The second company was mustered into service on 
the 28th of November, 1861, and the third on the 10th 
of December, 1861. Each of these companies consisted 
of three officers and ^inety-five men. They left the 
State for "Washington as soon as mustered, and reported 
to Colonel Berdan, at Camp of Instruction. They were 
assigned to the second regiment as Companies F and G. 
The following were the officers of all these companies 
during their term of service, with the recordiof each: 



568 THE GREAT REB:^LLI0N. 

Co. E. — Captains — Amos B. Jones, of "Washington. 

Promoted to Major 2d U. S. Sharpshooters, Dec. 3, 1861. 
William P. Austin, of Claremont. 
Wounded Aug. 30, 1862. Discharged on account of wounds May 16, 1863. 

William G. Andrews, of Warner. 
Wounded slightly Aug. 16, 1864. Mustered out Sept. 8, 1864. 

First Lieuts. — ^William P. Austin, of Claremont. 

Promoted to Captain Dec. 20, 1861. 

William H. Gibbs, of Hanover. 

Kesigned Aug. 81, 1862. 

William G. Andrews, of Warner. 

Promoted to Captain Oct. 1, 1863. 

Samuel D, Monroe, of Washington. 

Killed at Kelley's Ford, Va., Nov. 7, 1863. 

Isaac Davis, of Fisherville. 

Wounded severely May 31, 1864. Mustered out Sept. 8, 1864. 

Second Lieuts. -p- William H. Gibbs, of Hanover. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Dec. 20, 1861. 

Cyrus E. Jones, of Bradford. 

Wounded and captured at Malvern Hill, Va. Exchanged. Died of wounds 
ftt New York City Aug. 7, 1862. 

Benjamin F. Brown, of Concord. 

Discharged for disability August 18, 1863. 

Samuel D. Monroe, of Washington. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Oct. 1, 1863. 

Co. F. — Captains — Henry M. Caldwell, of Dunbarton. 

Died July 12, 1862. 
Edward T. Eowell, of Concord. 

Promoted to Major July 1, 1854. 

Samuel F. Murray, of Auburn. 

Honorably discharged Dec. 29, 1864. 

Asel B. Griggs, of Orford. 

Transferred to Co. K, 5th N. H. V., to date Dec. 23, 1864. 

First Lieuts. — James H. Hildreth, of Lebanon. 

Kesigned August, 1863. 
Samuel F. Murray, of Auburn. 

Promoted to Captain Sept. 10, 1863. 
Edwin F. Chadwick, of Boscawen. 

Honorably discharged April 25, 1864. 

Asel B. Griggs, of Orford. 

Promoted to Captain Jan. 16, 1865. 

James E. FoUansbee, of Mont Vernon. 
Transferied to Co. K, 5th N. H. V.. to date Dec. 23, 1864. 



SSASPSBOOTERS. 569 

Second Lieuts. — ^Edward T. Eowell, of Concord. 

Promoted to Captain July 13, 1862, 

Samuel ¥. Murray, of Auburn. 

Promoted to First Lieut. Aug. 80, 1863. 
Asel B. Griggs, of Orford. 
Wounded June 21, 1864. Promoted to First Lieut. Not. 22, 1864. 

Oo. G. — Captains — "William D. McPherson, of Concord. 

Resigned Oct. 31, 1862. 
Howard P. Smith, of Hudson. 

Wounded May 6, 1864. Mustered out Dec. 24, 1864. 

First Lieuts. — John A. Moores, of Canterbury. 

Resigned Not. 14, 1862. 

Albert G. Fisher, of New Ipswich. 

Discharged April 2, 1864. 
Abner D. Colby, of Manchester. 
I'aken prisoner May 6, 1864. Exchanged Feb. 28, 1865. Mustered out 
June 21, 1865. 

Second Lieuts. — Edward Dow, of Concord. 

Resigned July 16, 1862. 
John "W". Thompson, of Nashua. 

Killed Sept. 17, 1862. 

Howard P. Smith, of Hudson. 

Promoted to Captain Not. 1, 1862. 

"Warren H. Fletcher, of Claremont. 

Transferred to Co. K, 5th N. H. V., Dec. 23, 1864. 

Company E spent the winter of 1861-62 at Camp of 
Listruction in drilling and target practice. Early in the 
spring of 1862 the First Regiment United States Sharp- 
shooters was assigned to Fitz John Porter's Division, 
with which it made its first campaign. On the 9th of 
March, in a reconnoissanee toward Big Bethel, the only 
enemy found was a few cavalry scouts, one of whom was 
shot from his horse at a distance of about thirteen 
hundred yards, by private James Morse, of company E. 
This was the first man shot on either side in the Penin- 
sula campaign. The regiment took the advance of the 
Fifth Corps on the march to "yorktown, and on the 5th 
of April distinguished themselves in the first battle of 
the campaign, crawling up near the enemy's works and 
with their target rifles picking off" the rebel gunners so 



570 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

surely as to render their batteries nearly useless. It was 
in this engagement that the company lost its first man 
killed, private J. S. M. Ide, of Claremont. During the 
long siege of Yorktown which succeeded, the sharp- 
shooters were constantly at work, and kept the enemy 
from molesting working parties. 

After the capture of Yorktown, on the 5th of May, 
they proceeded by water to West Point, where they 
exchanged their target guns for Sharpe's rifles. On the 
27th they took part in the battle of Hanover Court 
House, and then accompanied Porter's Corps through 
the famous seven days' fight, losing heavily in the battles 
of Mechanicsville, Gaines' Mill and Malvern Hill. At 
the latter place Second Lieut. C. E. Jones was wounded 
and taken prisoner, soon after which he died. At 
Gainesville and second Bull Run, in August, the com- 
pany suffered considerable loss in killed and wounded, 
among the latter of whom was Captain "William P. Aus- 
tin, of Claremont, who had his arm severely shattered. 
At Blackford's Ford, on the 19th of September, in a 
sharp engagement, they drove the rebels and captured 
several pieces of artillery. They took part in the terri- 
ble battle of Fredericksburg, on the 13th of December, 
and were the last troops withdrawn across the river after 
the attack was abandoned. 

Early in January, 1863, the two regiments of sharp- 
shooters were brought together in one command, under 
Colonel Berdan. While thus organized they took part 
in the great battle of Chancellorsville, where they greatly 
distinguished themselves, first in the engagement known 
as " The Cedars," where they took the entire Twenty- 
third Georgia Regiment prisioners, and afterward in 
the great battle of May 3d, where they suffered heavily. 

At the battle of Gettysburg the sharpshooters were 
almost constantly engaged, and contributed their full 
share toward that victory which saved Washington from 



SHABPSEOOTERS. 571 

capture, and turned the tide in favor of the Union arms. 
They then joined in the pursuit of Lee, and bore the 
brunt of the sharp fight of "Wapping Heights, where 
their splendid skill in skirmishing, their coolness and 
the deliberation and accuracy of their aim won great 
praise from Generals Meade and French, who were eye- 
witnesses of their movements. They also distinguished 
themselves in a charge at Auburn, on the 13th of Octo- 
ber, which elicited a special complimentary order from 
the Corps commander. At Kelley's Ford, November 
3d, they drove the enemy across the Rappahannock, 
captured a large number of prisoners, and gained a 
lodgment of the Union forces on the other side of the 
river. Here Sergeant Samuel D. Monroe, who had been 
commissioned first lieutenant, but not mustered, was 
instantly killed. On the 27th and 28th of November, in 
the severe battles at Locust Grove and Mine Bun, they 
took an active part, and suffered considerable loss, 

Li the winter the sharpshooters were assigned to the 
Third Brigade, Third Division, Second Army Corps, 
General Hancock commanding, with Brigadier General 
Alexander Hayes as brigade commander. With this 
brigade they went through the bloody campaign of the 
summer of 1864, under fire almost without cessation, 
every day from the 6th of May until they were mustered 
out of service, during which campaign Captain "W. G. 
Andrews and First Lieut. Isaac Davis were both 
wounded. 

On the 8th of September the original members of 
Company E, less than a score in number, were mustered 
out of service. By order of the various Corps com- 
manders under which it served, this company was 
allowed to inscribe upon its colors the names and dates 
of thirty battles and skirmishes in which it participated, 
the first being at Lewinsville, September 27, 1861, and 
the last at Deep Bottom, August 15 and 16, 1864. 



572 THE GREAT REBELLION. 

Companies F and G formed a part of the Second Eegi- 
ment. After remaining at Camp of Instruction, near 
"Washington, through the winter of 1861-62, on the 18th 
of March the regiment was assigned to the brigade of 
General Augur, First Division, First Corps, and joined 
the command at Camp Williams, near Fairfax Seminary. 
They met the ■ enemy for the first time at Falmouth, on 
the 15th of April, and in a short skirmish drove them 
across the Rappahannock. At the time of Banks' 
retreat to Harper's Ferry, and during the trip, the regi- 
ment lost one man killed and about sixty wounded, by a 
collision of trains on the railroad. On the 12th of July 
Captain H. M. Caldwell, Company F, died of typhoid 
fever, and the service thus lost a brave, patriotic and 
faithful officer. First Lieut. J. H. Hildreth was detailed 
as aid to General Gibbon, and the command of the 
company devolved on Lieut. Rowell. 

At Rappahannock Station, in a sharp engagement, on 
the 23d of August, Company F had its first man 
wounded — Sergeant J. P. Dodge, of New Boston. The 
two companies 1)ore an honorable part in the disastrous 
campaign of General Pope, in the battles of Sulphur 
Spi'ings, Gainesville, and Bull Run. They won great 
praise from their commanding officers at the battles of 
South Mountain and Antietam, where they suffered 
heavy losses. Among the killed was Second Lieut. J. 
W. Thompson, of Company G, who was shot through 
the head while attempting to capture a stand of rebel 
colors. The regiment was hotly engaged at Fredericks- 
burg, on the 13th of December, under General Franklin. 
As stated, the two regiments of sharpshooters were 
brought together in oQe brigade, early in January, 1863, 
and so continued through the campaign of the succeed- 
ing summer. At Sulphur Springs the First Regiment 
was transferred to the third brigade, while the Second 
remained with General "Ward's, taking part in the 



SHARPSSOOTERB. 573 

battles of Kelly's Ford, Locust Grove, Mine Eun, and 
encamped during the winter at Brandy Station, In 
January, 1864, more than two-thirds of each company 
re-enlisted, and the regiment became a veteran regiment 
and received a furlough. 

The history of these companies during the bloody 
campaign of 1864, is mainly like that of company E. 
They were used mostly as skirmishers and sharpshooters, 
and were almost constantly under fire. From the time 
of the consolidation of the two regiments, in- January, 
1863, they participated in the same battles and skir- 
mishes as Company E. Previous to this time they par- 
ticipated in eight engagements, in all of which they 
acted with great coolness and gallantry. Major Rowell 
was wounded severely at the battle of Petersburg ; Cap- 
tain Murray, Company F, was taken prisoner at the 
battle of Ream's Station, and was in the hands of the 
enemy several months, and Captain H. P. Smith, Com- 
pany G, was severely wounded in the battle of the 
Wilderness. The few original men of these two 
campanies who had not re-enlisted, were mustered 
out of service at the expiration of their term, in Novem- 
ber and December, 1864. The remainder, with the rest 
of the regiment, were consolidated into one company, 
with those left of the First Regiment, and were trans- 
ferred to the Fifth New Hampshire, in which they 
formed Company K, with three officers. Captain Griggs, 
First Lieut. Follansbee, and Second Lieut. Fletcher. 

These three companies of Sharpshooters contained 
some of the best rifle shots in the State, and have not 
been surpassed by any organization from' New Hamp- 
shire for the intelligence and soldierly qualities of their 
members. They participated in more battles and skir- 
mishes than the average of regiments, and probably 
killed more rebels than the same number of troops in 
any other arm of the service ; while from their having 



574 THE ORE AT REBELLION. 

been seldom used in line of battle in dense masses, tbey 
suffered less loss in comparison than many other regi- 
ments. 



SUMMABT OF NEW HAMPSHIRE TROOPS. 

Whole nujnber of different commissioned officers, 1601 

Promoted in Regiments, 761 

Promoted out of Regiments 50 

Whole number of commissions issued 2362 

Declined commissions, , 49 

Not mustered in grade to which commissioned 217 

Mustered out at expiration of term, ...784 

Honorably discharged for various reasons, 466 

Killed in action, or died of wounds 136 

Died of disease, 43; committed suicide, 1 44 

Dishonorably discharged, 39; Commissions revoked, 13 52 

Whole num